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Hey yall. The question is the title. I was just wondering. Personally, I have nothing bad to say about the 20 gauge. Its the only shotgun I've ver dealt with, I've never shot a 12 gauge, so I guess I'm a bit biased in a way. I was just wantin to get everyone's generl opinion on the 20 gauge. Is it just for women/small adults/kids to shoot, or is it a man's gun also? I mean sometimes I get to feelin pretty whimpy b/c I'm so partial to a 20 gauge. I dunno. Here:http://www.internetarmory.com/shotgun_ammo.htm it states that a 20 gauge has the ballistic force of 2 .44 magnum rounds in one shotshell. I dont know about everything, but if thats true, then its certainly nothing to mess with. I reckon what I'm getting at is that I like the 20 gauge, and wonder if by any chance am I weird because I like and use a smaller shotgun? Feel free to post, anyone is welcome.
 

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The 20 is a alright gauge, but my favorite is the 28 ga. followed by the .410.
 

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Almost all of my shooting is sporting clays, which is generally considered a 12 gauge sport, except for special small-bore prelims at the larger tournaments.

I have learned from experience that I shoot better with a very light gun. For about 18 months I competed with a 20 gauge gun just because the weight and profile suited me better than any 12 ga I had tried up to that time. I had some success with it, and didn't feel like I was at a large disadvantage, but I eventually switched to a 12 ga Beretta Ultralight. I now use a very light automatic - a field grade 391.

For sporting clays, the 20 ga probably is a disadvantage, but not a very big one, and other factors (like the weight, in my case) may be more important. For skeet and some upland bird hunting, there probably is no disadvantage at all. For trap, turkey, deer, waterfowl, and some upland birds, there is a bigger disadvantage, but there is no reason you couldn't use it anyway.

Heck, if you like it, shoot it!
 

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For sporting clays, the 20 ga probably is a disadvantage, but not a very big one, and other factors (like the weight, in my case) may be more important. For skeet and some upland bird hunting, there probably is no disadvantage at all. For trap, turkey, deer, waterfowl, and some upland birds, there is a bigger disadvantage, but there is no reason you couldn't use it anyway.
Like he says, it depends on what you are using it for. I use a 12 gauge for waterfowl and sporting clays where distances can be out there. But, I personally like the 20 best for doves, quail, skeet, etc.
 

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excellent upland or clays gun!
Not "unmanly", unless you think everyone's a wimp if they don't carry a 10 gauge Magnum while quail hunting? :roll:
 

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I love the 20. No doubt about it. The 12 to me is strictly about utility, and only because I am most into goose hunting. I would use a 20 for anything else without much hesitation, and I'd like it a lot better for the weight issue!

My dream gun is a 16 SxS on a 20 gauge frame, but that wouldn't be a very good goose gun either. :wink:

-Dave
 

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Here are my favorites:
For upland birds- my 6.0 pound 16 ga O/U
For sporting clays- 12 ga.
For skeet- (most fun) .410
Best alround- 20 ga.

But I load my 12 ga & 20 ga loads down. 12 ga at 1 ounce, and 20 ga at 3/4 ounce, both slower at about 1140 FPS. I am a recoil wuss!

But to each their own, that is why the Big Guy created variety, as in blondes, brunettes and redheads!
 

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In my above post, what I meant to say about the 20 ga is that it is my favorite best all round gauge FOR SKEET!

My perception of the 20 ga is that it is AVERAGE. That is to say less recoil/power than the 12, more than the 28 or .410.

Of course the size of the frame it can be built on is less bulky and cumbersome than the 12 ga, and that is a nice attribute.
 

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I spent 10 days hunting WILD pheasant in South Dakota this fall. Took 2 guns with me, both beretta SP III's. One a 12 ga 28" ic/im the other 20 ga 26" mod/full. Carried the 20 all but one day didn't feel undergunned with the 20. Didn't feel any real advantage with the 12. Carrying an exta pound in my hands for an entire afternoon made a difference, weight of the 12 was a disadvantage. Birds came down just as dead with the smaller gun. Shot 1-1/4 oz in both guns. BTW I hunt over a pair of close working Llewellins, so most of my shooting was inside of 30 yds. I often take the 20 to the sporting clays course. Although I have a O/U 12 30" sporting gun, it is alot of fun to shot the smaller gun especially when you beat 4 decent shooters with their "cannons". Do I prefer the 20 ga? You bet!
 

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From one Georgia boy to another...the 20 is a great gun in my experience. If you are a good shot with it, you should never feel undergunned. That is not to say that the 20 is ideal for every type of game...IMO, the 12 takes the cake when it comes to big Georgia toms or high flying wood ducks and mallards, but for upland birds, rabbit, squirrel, and pretty much everything else...the 20 is hard to beat.

Now I have a 20 ga. question of my own....after all my years of shooting the 20, I am just learning that some of the guns I own aren't built on a truly 20 ga frame. Some are built on a 12 ga. frame. What are the advantages/disadvantages? I am also looking at the Franchi Alcioni which can be purchased with 12 and 20 ga. barrells (I am a stickler for affordable O/U's)...anybody know how the 20 ga handles in this situation??

CT
 

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I love the 20 Gauge. It's just fun to shoot.

Many time, my brother and I will bring our 20's to the trap range and just hammer away all day with them.

When competing, I used my XT.

The one biggest DIS-advantage I see with the 20 gauge is strictly related to TRAP. No one seems to want to build a decent dedicated 20 gauge TRAP gun.
 

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If ya like the 20 gauge, by all means carry and use one. I have several 12 and 20 gauges and enjoy them all (I'd get a 16 and 28 and a 410 if I had space to put them). IMO the shooting sports are not about impressing others with how big of a "gun" you pack but rather about safety, sportsmanship, and enjoying shooting.
 

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mountainview;

Don't let the room to keep them bother you, get them now, while you's still alive! There won't be much extra room in the soft padded box later on either! :wink:

BP
 

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What a great question! As an FNG (that's Friendly New Guy) to you smart asses out there, it's a question I've been wanting to ask but didn't have the cahones to do so. I like my 20 a lot but the idea of a nice 12 o/u is very appealing. Thanks for the question and thanks for the answers! This is a teriffic forum. Now if winter would just end, I'd get out of cyberspace and out to the range.
 

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I dont understand the weight benefit on a 20 gauge.

For example, looking at berettausa.com, all Silver Pigeon S, II, III, IV field grade guns regardless of the gauge and barrel length are listed at 6.8 lbs ... with the exception of White Onyx that is 6.7 lbs.

How come the weights on these 20s are the same even though they're are smaller guns. Is this only the case with Berettas? I tried a White Onyx 20 ***** in the store and I could swear it felt lighter than the 12s....even though the listed weight difference is only 0.1 lbs
 

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It sounds like those 20s are built on a 12ga frame. A good 20 gauge should have a dedicated frame that is scaled down, hence the weight reduction. I've been looking for a nice 20 gauge SxS for over a year now. Still looking for something in my price range. :(
 

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My 686 20 ga., 28" barrel weighs just a hair over 6 lbs. Due to excellent stock design, it is probably the lightest-kicking 20 I have ever shot. (Of course, the stock is a perfect fit for me.)

It's NOT a 12-ga. frame, it is definitely smaller.

I think they only listed the avg. weight of the 12s.

BobK
 
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