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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am interested in picking up a cheap double-barrel shotgun for around $100. I really like the side-by-side look, but several people have told me to go with the over-under style. All I am going to be doing is shooting clay pigeons.

Does anyone have any suggestions as to quality models or possibly the cheaper ones in the double-barrel market?
 

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Unless you stumble across the deal of a lifetime, a side-by-side for $100 is probably a wall hanger. The low-priced SxS guns, like the Savage/Stevens usually sell for $250 or better if they are in decent shape.

For an O/U, a Savage 430 is about $400 for one in decent shape.

Any two-piper is going to cost more than a pump or autoloader of comparable quality... there's just more work goes into making one.
 

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Right after someone finds that one for you, ask them to find me a good 1962 Corvett in good condition for $1,000. :roll:

Good luck.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Those prices are MUCH higher than I anticipated. I guess I will just look for a deal somewhere, keep my eyes open.
 

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I bought a $100 gun once. It was 20 years old, about 9lbs, had an adjustable choke, auto action, and only shot real hot ammo. You also had to clean it after a box of shells or it would jam. I sold it for $75 2 years after I got it. That was about what I expected and got for a $100 gun with more than one shot.
 

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You can get a single shot, single barrel gun, new, from Wal-Mart for less than $100, I think. I know my local Bi-Mart carries one. Can't remember the name.

You're not going to find a functional double barrel (O/U or SxS) for that price, though.

Good luck whatever you decide. Don't buy (or "shoot", rather) junk. It might explode in your face.

-- Sam
 

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Really cheap side by sides can be very frustrating, even if all you're doing is shooting informal clays. They have a habit of shooting to divergent points of aim. Also, they can shoot loose. If you want a cheap repeater buy a pump.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I really appreciate the advice. Please, I'll take any more you can give.

I purchased a Stevens Model 58 bolt-action (I was drawn by the novelty of it) for $89 about two months ago. It's in excellent condition, but the magazine doesn't feed well (spring is shot I think). So I bought two new ones from www.e-gunparts.com. That fixed the problem until BOTH (not just one) magazines broke. That was after loading NO MORE than 10 rounds into each. Needless-to-say, I'm sending them back today for a refund.

So now I've got a bolt-action that I have to hand-load one at a time. I figured that I might as well have a breach-loading gun. I'm hoping to trade in my Stevens toward a side-by-side shotgun, but it looks like I am going to have to put more money into it than I originally thought.
 

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Yup, bolt-action shotguns are at the bottom of the pecking order--they are usually cheap, have inferior quality, and swing like an oar. That said, they are optimal for some purposes, like mounting on a go-cart for extra firepower (do not try this at home) or replacing a fence post. Many of us had them as kids, so they have a bit of sentimental value, but they won't get you big trade-in bucks. I personally think a decent bolt-action shotgun would be an ok deer or turkey getter (prolly better for deer than turkey), but I'm sure I'm in the minority on that. If you want a lower cost side by side, look around for a Stevens model 311 double in decent shape, or a Winchester Model 24, and you'll be in business. There are probably other good buys too in o/u and sxs--perhaps other SGW members will chime in with some further info :)

Welcome to the forum, and best of luck with your search :)

Jeff23
 

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SirHub, I think most people are surprised at how much O/U's cost when they first start shooting. :D

But instead of finding a gun within their original price range, I think everyone eventually adjusts their price range upwards toward the gun they want! You just can't help yourself... :oops:

If you really want to blow your mind, how about $6000 for a Beretta DT-10 Trident? Or next time you're shopping, check prices on Perazzi shotguns - now we're into 5-digits. Double-barreled shotguns are the most expensive category of firearms, I would think, since they can run into the tens of thousands of dollars. At that point, you're paying for gold inlay and 400 year-old wood, but it can still break a clay.
 

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Hey SirHub,

Jeff23 made an excellent point (but we expect that of him now :) ) about pumps. If you're just looking to get into the clay shooting sports, you can get an awfully decent pump-action shotgun for a couple hundred dollars (or less). It's true that O/Us and semi-autos are more common at the clays range, but no one will blink an eye if you show up with a pump.

But it sounds to me like you're just as interested in owning an over-under as you are in actually shooting the clays. Nothing wrong with that - I'm the same way about firearms :D

I think I got interested in precision rifle shooting because I wanted to own a bolt-action Remington, not vice versa. Weird, I know...
 

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Sander said:
If you're just looking to get into the clay shooting sports, you can get an awfully decent pump-action shotgun for a couple hundred dollars (or less).
I see Mossberg 500's in decent shape at my local pawnshops for as little as $90 with fixed choke barrels (usually 28" modified or 30" full choke). I purchased one for my son to shoot for that amount, and he's been very happy with it. Go to some local pawns and check out used Mossberg 500's and Remington 870's if SxS guns end up being too expensive for you.

Regards,
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Again, this is all good advice. Many thanks.

Since my dad is going to be giving me his 870 in about a year, I'm trying to find something that will tide me over until then but not be a duplicate firearm. Henceforth, I'm looking at double-barrel shotguns. I have seen some good deals on 870s and Mossberg 500s, but decided to look for something different. So, I might see if I can find a Stevens 311 or Winchester 24.

I've heard stories of side-by-side shotguns being sub-standard, even on this thread. Is it true that a SxS will shoot loose, more than an over-under? If a SxS is going to fall apart on me, I guess I should look for and over-under, even though I would rather have the SxS.

At any rate, I'm going to start looking around in different shops to see what I can find, so any more suggestions on less-expensive models of SxS would be appreciated. I think I'm going to have to up my price to $200, in addition to my Stevens 58 trade-in.
 

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Sir Hub--

Making a SXS is still sort of the apex of the shotgun builder's art and craft. It's hard to get the two tubes to shoot to a point of aim, resonate so that they don't loosen, etc. A cheap and shoddy sxs will deteriorate even faster than other cheap guns. But a good sxs is a thing of beauty and a joy forever. The 311 and the 24 are both solid. As I said, I'd be interested in hearing from you (or anyone really) if you acquire a model 24. I don't have direct experience with them, but I'm very interested in one. I see what you mean about the 870.

Good luck with it, and let us know how it works out!

Jeff23

Nice trap game, by the way :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Is it true that the Stevens 411 is a poorly made gun? I've heard some bad things about Steven's new side-by-side, that it is made in Russia and a peice of junk.

Any comments?
 

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I heard it from an old time gun dealer that one of these Russian made doubles would "not be given to my worst enemy." He claimed that the "innards" of the action (the trigger assembly, hammer, et al is crude in the extreme in these shotguns and will not hold up in the long run. He said that guns like this were known to break firing pins after just a few dry firings.

It's hearsay, so I wouldn't take it for the last word, but I'd do my homework before investing in one.

Mike
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The new 411 comes with a single trigger and selector switch, as opposed to dual triggers. Is one better than the other? I suppose most of that answer would be personal preference, but I wonder if one mechanism is simpler and more robust than the other?

Also, does the Winchester Model 24 have ejectors or extractors? How about the Stevens 311?
 
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