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Got a question to throw out: The land I have to hunt has several different patches of milo growing on it. I went out yesterday (Labor Day) with my son and daughter and we saw only a few doves, although we saw many, many other types of birds flying around. I'm a newbie to dove hunting and have yet to make many associates who hunt doves. I was wondering if the milo needs to be harvested before it will make a good dove field? Should I just check the fields every week to see if they are harvested and then go after some doves or did we just have a bad day? (I was told doves love milo.)

Also, what do you do with the birds after you shoot them? Immediately put them on ice in a cooler or just keep them out of the sun until after the hunt? I live in west TN and it was close to 90 yesterday and will be in the 80s the rest of the first segment of dove hunting (thru Sept 26), so preventing spoilage is an issue.

P.S. The landowner leases his land to farmers and they do more deer hunting than anything, so I don't think I have the option of requesting some land to be prepared for dove hunting each year. I just have to take what I can get.
 

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If you really want to kill doves find a corn or milo field near a permanent source of water , pond ,arigation well something like that that is where the doves will be. Doves are like any other animal they are unpredictable and it is hard to nail them down to staying in any one particular area.
 

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Harvested milo will help the dove situation. Like the post above said, find some water and you'll probably find some doves. They'll fly to water just before flying up to loaf the afternoon hours.
This is generally their day:
Roost
Food
Grit
Water
Loaf
Water
Loaf
Food
Grit
Water
Roost
 

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You might be surprised what asking the farmers can get you. If you offer to either lease 5-10 acres and/or pay for the gas and grain you could have a nice dove field next year. Just a matter of finding out what it would take to make it worth their while....you could think of maintaining a wheat crop to double as a deer food plot.

Milo, corn, and winter wheat all make great dove crops but it is better when they are harvested as the dove like to land on clean ground with not much predator cover.

As to the doves afterwards, keeping them in the sun is not the best thing. Ants, flies, and lord knows what else can get on and in them. A bucket or vest kept in the shade would be the least way to go and a small cooler would be better. Remember not to stack the birds even in the cooler as the feathers will maintain body heat. You could partially clean them, but would be required to keep either the head or a wing attached while still in the field.

Look for a dead tree at the edge of the field, a power line, anywhere the dove can come to the field and look things over. Dove decoys work great on the same dead snags.
 
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