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No harm, I've dry fired many of my A5's with no ill effects... ever. But if you are concerned about possibly damaging the firing pin you can insert a tongue suppressor (or similar flat piece of wood) in the slotted part of the receiver. While using slight downward pressure, it will catch the hammer as it moves forward from trigger pull. Once hammer is released, slowly remove tongue suppressor and all there will be, if any, is a light tap on back of the bolt/pin. This is the "poor mans" way, but as already mentioned, a snap cap will work. Personally, I like to store my guns uncocked.

P.S-- Make sure gun is unloaded before attempting the "poor mans" procedure. I'm sure you already know, but it never hurts to repeat it. As always....SAFETY FIRST.

A5-HUNTER
 

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I've personally broken the firing pin on a model 12 by dry firing. Didn't find out until the opening day of duck season....first shot of the day..last shot of the day...

I'd recommend using a snap cap if you feel the need to store your A-5 'fired'.
Ross
 

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There is no good reason to drop the hammer when you store these guns. AND the flat spring that drops the hammer is the last thing you need to worry about. Both of my 100 year old A5s have probably never been stored uncocked and the original hammer springs are as strong as new.

And if you were really worried about springs there are the main recoil spring on the magazine and the action spring in the tube in the stock to consider....who would take off the barrel and stock to release the pressure on these springs anyway?

And based on my understanding of metalurgy springs do not fail or fatigue from being left compressed for long periods of time. They fatigue and fail from cycles of use. There really no good reason to drop the hammers.

Jeff
 
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