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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I noticed this year, since I bought my first english stock shotgun, that I often had the stock placed right on the shoulder muscle (while "reflex" shooting on birds).
Is it because of the angle of the hand, that " automatically" places the elbow higher than with a pistol grip?
Is it because I'm still not used to that new hand position (I didn't practice shooting this year, got my gun late, already in full bird season...)?

Insights???

louisN
 

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YOU are doing something wrong to do that! You always should put your left foot forward (right handed shooter) and lift the gun to your face. It only takes a fraction of a second to do.

What do you describe as a reflex shot? Sounds kind of dangerous to me!

By the way, check the length of pull, that just may need a slight correction!

BobK
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I learned to shoot the Churchill method (parallel feet), because I mostly hunt ruffed grouse and woodcock.
These birds often catch you off guard, and if you wait for the opposite foot to be placed forward, you'll end up.....saving a lot of ammo.... :) .
Reflex shooting means you move the forward hand towards the bird (I point my index parallel to the barrels), while the back hand lifts to the cheek. Once the stock is on the cheek, BOOM! That doesn't mean you shoot without thinking...
But these birds allow only a fraction of a second before they're gone...
I feel the wrist position is a little different with straight stock....

LouisN
 

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Yes, the straight grip is a bit different, but is more intuitive and can/should be faster pointing.

Your problem is likely the gun doesn't fit you right for the instinctive style of shooting that you are trying to use. Or, if as you say, you are setting the butt to far out, not in the pocket, you are bringing your face over to the gun, not the gun to your face.

I suggest that you practice mounting, the correct way at home. If it is not the fit, that should help get you into the "groove".

Clyde
 

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Screw Churchill and the parallel feet! I am a US grouse hunter, and used 2-trigger doubles, and still often do, although some are single trigger today! What you are referring to should be approached as a classic snap shot, but well pointed.

The Churchill method was described and recommended for English and Scottish driven birds, which usually come at you, "incomers", and are overhead and in the clear when you shoot 'em, usually at 30 to 40 yards or even more. Yeah, I used it for that when I had the opportunity to shoot driven birds, and it worked FINE for them.

But for grouse hunting here in the US, you won't get very much of THAT kind of shooting! Usually jumped, and rapidly departing birds in thick brush, or in the open plains at longer range, and that takes a standard stance!

Go to a skeet range and shoot some clays starting from a "gun down" position - it will teach you a LOT! And you will quickly drop the Churchill method.

I did the same thing when I was a kid, and had the purple bruises to prove it, even though the gun fit fine. It was not too smart, but I quickly learned! And you don't hit very much that way, either! You STILL have to point the gun, and the only way to do that is to have your head tight to the wood on the stock, and to do that, you've got to have the gun in the "shoulder pocket", where God meant it to be!

Then you can work on gun fit if you still have problems.

BobK
 

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southpawnot: I am a grouse hunter from PA.I own a AyA SxS 12ga 2 3/4in 28in barrel that has a English stock I have never had a problem with my shooting. Sounds like it may be a gun fit problem to me. YES! them grouse flush & get airborne quickly.
 

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I have an English stock RRL and find that it comes to my shoulder very naturally and very quickly and I seem to shoot very well with it.
I think the other posters are right, it just may be gun fit. You can practice your mount a little more and see if that helps any.
 

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It maybe that the gun you are used to is set up totally different.If it was an old sxs chances are it had much more of an heel drop than your English stock.Also most European guns have a stock offset(right or left) while must American guns are neutral.(Look down the bottom side of the barrel. From the muzzle end see if the butt of the stock kicks right,left or is neutral.)

Bottom line if the LOP is ok than you just have to get used to the gun.
 
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