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my dad's been a shotgun shooter since he was a kid but i never really got into it... now that i'm in college with the typical "try anything once" mentality i'm interested in learning with him. he started off as a kid with a .410, but he owns only 12ga now... do you think it would be ok for me to learn to shoot with one of his 12ga's, or should i invest in a gun for myself in a smaller gauge e.g. 20? i consider myself average-sized, athletic build, so i'm slightly confident that i can handle a 12ga but then again i've never shot any gun before so i'm not sure exactly what to expect in terms of recoil so 12ga might be too much for a guy who's never laid his hands on a gun... thanks for your input ~eric
 

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Try one of your Dad's 12 ga. and see if you like it. You won't know until you try.
You should be fine with a 12 ga.

I went to the range for the first time this week. Shot a 20 ga. and a 12 ga. I'll probably be getting a 12 ga. soon.

Scott
 

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You'll be absolutely fine with the 12. Recoil has less to do with the gauge than with good technique and a solid mount. It also depends on the type of gun. A 12-gauge semi-auto will have virtually no recoil compared to a pump-action or double-barrel.

Even a 28 gauge can bruise you if you don't know what you're doing :D

Go for the 12, but make sure you have someone show you the basics of how to mount and fire the gun...

good luck
 

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Hi there Pilario--

I agree with Sander, and would add that it also depends on the type of load. If you get a low recoil 12-ga load, made for the clays, you'll have less recoil that a 20 ga. 3" magnum. Don't forget that recoil is a combinaion of Newtonian effects: the "equal and opposite reaction" that occurs when you fire the gun, and "inertia" the tendency of a heavier object to stay in place longer. The 12 ga. wieghs more than the 20, sometimes as much as pound more--that makes alot of difference.

I'm a cranky old fart, but I dislike semi-autos, especially for a first gun. They are all too ready to bust another cap whenever you feel like pulling trigger. However, don't take me too seriously on this--we're in the realm of personal taste here. Other guns are similar--the second shot on a double is ultra fast, so it's kinda like a personal gripe.

Sander also mentioned gun mount, and I agree--you will find this all-important. If you a have a loose, sloppy mount, the barrel will whip aound faster, but the stock will fetch you a sharp crack under the eye when you crank off a round. Learn to mount the gun solidly and you'll never regret it, I promise!

Come back and let us know how things are shaking out; we'll all learn something from your experience, and you'll soon be helping newcomers too!

All the Best and Welcome!,

Jeff23
 
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