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I just started shooting skeet a couple of month's ago and have been told that I am stopping my swing at the shot.The best I have done is 17. I would like to but the recoil shoves the barrel up and by the time I get it back down,the bird is long gone.Sometimes I can hit doubles,but most of the time I can't get the gun down fast enough. I also handload either 8's or 9's to about 1250 fps in a 1 oz load.I just reduced that to 1180 fps.I also got a new beretta AL390. Its at the gunshop now getting a decelarater pad installed.How can I solve my problem? thanks. sj :?:
 

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Bring those one oz loads down into the 1125-1180 2-3/4 dram range and see if that doesn't help on the muzzle jump and recoil, another option would be a barrel weight.

The need to stay with the same speed shell, as your leads can vary with different ones although not great, when you are starting you need to keep as much consistent as possible.

Muzzle jump is a part of shooting, many guns have porting to help reduce this. Follow through is a forced habit that you have to learn to do and should occur whether the muzzle rises or not. What happens to many shooters is that they stop their swing as they pull the trigger, you just have to think about keeping the muzzle in motion as you squeeze the trigger.

Muscle memory can be built through practice, simply mount the gun with a snap cap and follow a straight line such as where a wall meets a ceiling, pick a point somewhere inbetween and pull the trigger. See how many of those you can do back to back before your arm gets tired, not too many I would bet. That small amount of rest between shots really works in your favor. But, as you practice your gun mount you can also practice follow through.

In skeet the birds come from the same place and follow the same path. What do you do when you are on station 4 and have the pairs going opposite directions?
One thing to do is pay close attention to several good shooters, where is the gun pointed as they take on the second bird? Todd Benders video with the eye cams can show what they see. http://www.***********/v_sun2.htm

There are some regular skeet shooters here that may have some other suggestions for you.
 
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sjones said:
I just started shooting skeet a couple of month's ago and have been told that I am stopping my swing at the shot.The best I have done is 17. I would like to but the recoil shoves the barrel up and by the time I get it back down,the bird is long gone.Sometimes I can hit doubles,but most of the time I can't get the gun down fast enough. I also handload either 8's or 9's to about 1250 fps in a 1 oz load.I just reduced that to 1180 fps.I also got a new beretta AL390. Its at the gunshop now getting a decelarater pad installed.How can I solve my problem? thanks. sj :?:
Check to see if your gun fits you. It should not have enough recoil kick it off your shoulder. Recoil pad will help but fitting will help even more.
 

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Consider the things that help stop or control recoil:

1. Barrel/gun weight; long barrels, double barrels, or guns which tend to have muzzle-heavy balance can help calm recoil a lot. This can influence what kind of gun you want to be shooting. Weight calms recoil.

2. Recoil reducing mechanics; semi-autos have inherent actions that can dampen recoil. Also, porting reduces recoil quite a bit. A recoil pad does NOT reduce recoil, it only helps absorb it... It is a PASSIVE device which does its work after the shot occurs. You don't want to rely on a buttpad to help with recoil.

3. Gun fit; A well fitting gun will not transmit recoil as readily as one which does not fit well. This may sound counter-intuitive, but it is true.

4. Light loads; Light loads reduce recoil by just not generating very much. I shoot 12Ga 7/8 oz duplex loads myself, with well over 1250 fps, with great results.

As you get into the sport, these are things to think about.

Have fun!
 

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I would definitely recommend the poormans magtube recoil reducer (<--link) from Tom Morton. I have one and it definitely has a significant effect on recoil. Another plus is that it doesn't require any permanent modifications to the gun or gunsmithing. It replaces the hunting plug in an auto. The only major drawback I can think of is that it does make the gun noticeably heavier, but not so much that I would remove it.
I also read an article somewhere online (I'll try to find the link) that talked about follow through. The guy wrote some book on shooting clays. He said that concentrating on follow through is a mistake and that what you should actually do is keep your eye on the target. According to the article, if you just look at the target (ie: never look at the bead, rib, etc.) you will naturally follow through enough to be effective. He said that making an effort to follow through just wastes time between targets on doubles and can make it more difficult to acquire the second target.
 

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SJ, when teaching at my club we have students call for the target but not shoot it. They follow it all the way to the ground with a sustained lead. Do several in a row, then do every other bird for several. Watch one, shoot one, repeat...

As mentioned earlier, use the lightest loads available and even consider using lower gauges.
 

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Your stance can impact your swing and follow-through. I would have someone watch you shoot. You may have to adjust your stance for skeet.

In skeet, you don't typically have a front foot and back foot. If you do, then chances are that you have to twist your back to get to some shots. A better stance has your feet roughly shoulder width apart. For a right handed shooter, keep the majority of your weight on your left foot. When you swing, you turn through your legs, not your upper body.

I hope that makes sense. That was one of the adjustments I had to make for skeet and it helped. More than anything, I really have to concentrate on what I'm doing in skeet. I have about 3 or 4 bad habits that will come out if I don't concentrate enough.

Having said all that, I've seen people stand just about every which way to shoot skeet. I've seen a 16 year old do the exact opposite of what I just explained. He shot well and hit just about everything. I told him that 20 years from now his back won't like the twisting he's doing. :)

Anyway, practice your swing and see if you reach a point some way through it where your body doesn't want to continue turning/swinging. If that is the case, then your stance is part of the problem.
 
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you point your feet to where you want to break the bird,then you pivot your body back to the respective house,keeping the muzzle of the gun an average of 8 ft. away from the window.

in that hold stance,with muzzle still,you roll your EYES only towards the window.

this way ,when the bird is launched,you will unwind like a coil spring as you track and fire.also,the bird will not get a jump on you.

you continue "unwinding" way past the moment of firing,this is called "follow thru".

one person described follow thru as an artists long brush stroke
 

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Yes! That's part of what I was trying to say, only you said it better. Thank you masked man!
 
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