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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There are maybe two kinds of dog owners (OK there are more than two!) :lol: . Some like a breed and stick with it, individual after individual. Others switch around, looking for something different. I've had a lab (great girl), two Gordon setter brothers (one family oriented, one field focused), a mutt beagle (sure liked to run), and a few less-sporting dogs (border collie, Australian cattle dog, and corgii for our sheep). Always more than one dog in our household, never kept in kennels. We have children, 11 acres fenced.

I'm looking at the German Wirehaired Pointer as a potential dual purpose hunter. Any advice, good or bad experiences, etc. would be appreciated.
 

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DB- I've trained all kinds of dogs - pointers, flushers, retreivers. So, while I have my favorites, I too jump breeds. Right now, I'm buying a couple of European breeds. Wanna see what they've got to offer.

GWP is a good, versatile dog. It is obvious to me that you possess some intelligence, so head over to your neighborhood library and bone-up on the breed. I am reluctant to say to potential buyers of a particular breed: "Watch out for XXP dogs, they've had lots of temperment problems . . . Be careful when buying XXY dogs because they've got a high incidence of hip dysplasia and retinal atrophy . . . XXZ dogs seem to have lost their hunting instincts as there is too much show blood in them now" or any other type of caveats that might cause a buyer to have a mindset about a particular breed (only later to have their self-fulfilling prophecy come true).
GWPs can be trained to do whatever you want them to do -- track like bloodhounds if you so desire, be used exclusively as duck dogs, be used as combo upland bird pointer/waterfowl retriever, and even to run rabbits. So, go get one and "see fer yerself" as the saying goes. You won't be disappointed.

A "general hunting dog" book or two will get you started. The hunting dog magazines are full of well bred dogs in the classifieds. Utilize what the AKC has to say. And of course, there are breed specialty groups that have forums on the net, and local chapters near your hometown. The Verein Deutsch Drahthaar Club has an informative website (but I can't off-hand think of their actual name, do a google "drahthaar" search).

General Books - Gun Dog Breeds by Charles Fergus, Practical Hunter's Dog Book by John Falk (might be out of print, but othe Falk books are available). And don't forget to read past articles that have appeared in Gun Dog magazine on the breed like the June/July 2003 issue, "The Drahthaar" by Jerry Thoms.
 

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Duckbuddy, in addition to our PM conversation, I would be remiss if I also didn't tell you that while at obedience training, I had a GWP owner come over to me and say, "Why does your GWP do so well and mine just won't listen to me?" My guy, Jaeger, was tops in his intermediate obedience class even though I skipped beginner's class. Everyone figured I did alot of 'homework' with Jaeger. I didn't. He just has great breeding and I know how to handle dogs. With all the dogs you've had, you probably have the handling knowledge. You just need to make sure you get a well bred dog.

GWPs will do what is expected of them. If you expect little they give you little. If you expect much, they give much.

I too like to get a different breed of dog each time. How could my next dog hope to live up to the (often positively skewed) memories of my previous dogs? Jaeger's only 1 1/2 y.o. so it will be a long time before I have to worry about that, thankfully.

I forgot to add this: http://www.gwpca.com/html/
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the good information. I'll be hitting some of the hunter tests in our area and collecting information on successful breeders and breeding stock. I do believe that the biggest problems the various dog breeds have are their owners :? --although it doesn't have to be that way! Thanks again!
 
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duckbuddy said:
There are maybe two kinds of dog owners (OK there are more than two!) :lol: . Some like a breed and stick with it, individual after individual. Others switch around, looking for something different. I've had a lab (great girl), two Gordon setter brothers (one family oriented, one field focused), a mutt beagle (sure liked to run), and a few less-sporting dogs (border collie, Australian cattle dog, and corgii for our sheep). Always more than one dog in our household, never kept in kennels. We have children, 11 acres fenced.

I'm looking at the German Wirehaired Pointer as a potential dual purpose hunter. Any advice, good or bad experiences, etc. would be appreciated.
get one from tested gwpca stock. call them & ask check background talk to pro trainers
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Everyone, thanks for the input.

I've settled on a DD--the parent stock for the AKC's German wirehaired pointer. Found a local breeder, active in the VDD (the breed registry and testing org.). My pup will hit the ground in early March and I'll pick her up in early May. :)
 
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