Shotgun Forum banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
and have some questions about the fitting. The stockfitter asked me what type of clay sport I want to modify the stock to suit. I only have one gun, Winchester Supreme Select Sporting O/U 30", that I want to shoot all three events: sporting clay, skeet, and trap. My budget does not allow me to buy two more guns today. So how should the gun be fitter so I can do all three events but not necessarily handicap myself on any one of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,123 Posts
You should be able to. Atleast I do with good scores anyway. Actually when I started shooting a skeet gun in 5-stand my scores became consitantly better.

Good Luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
Hi Alex. The fitter is asking a good question. I don't know what the actual differences are in fine tuning the fit for each of those sports, but it's common for a Trap gun to shoot high. That's really just a sneaky trick to get more hits. The clay is going up, and so you need to lead it "up", but that usually means blocking the clay with the barrel. Hard to do. But if the gun shoots high, you can still see the clay and hit it too.

So, my guess, the fitter would make the gun shoot high if you want to focus on trap, and leave it centered for skeet and sporting clays.

But, shooting high or low is just one of 5 or 6 dimensions to be be adjusted. Didn't you mention in an earlier post that you were getting a bruised cheek? Make sure the fitter addresses this too! You shouldn't have to suffer, or make excuses about how it's really not your girlfriend slapping you! :wink:

Let us know what you learn, how well it works, what got changed, and all that!

-- Quackster
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
ALEX,
You might want to talk to the fitter about installing an adjustable comb to your stock. This way, you could adjust the comb higher to make the gun shoot higher for trap, and lower it back down for skeet and clays. You may also consider having a Graco adjustable butt plate installed so you can lengthen or shorten your stock as needed as well as canting the butt plate for more toe out. I think with the adjustable comb and a Graco butt plate, you should be able to adjust for about any shooting sport you want to indulge in.

JackL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi Quackster,
I don't know the three clay sports enough to decide which way the gun should be fitted. All I want (for now) is to fit the gun so it doesn't slap my cheek. I think if I can comfortably shoot my gun I can learn the sports fast.
Just out of curiosity, I took all my rifles (from 22LR to .223, .22-250, .308, to 7mm mag) out and shoulder them to see how they fit on me. They all fitted me very well. One thing in common to all rifles was they all have parallel combs and the stocks (therefore length of pull) are much shorter than that of my Winchester O/U shotgun. When I shot rifles on the bench I shot 50 to 100 rounds each sesson and didn't get one signle cheek slap. I almost want to believe Monte Carlo stocks fit me the best. I guess I haven't quite separate myself from rifle shooting when I am holding a shotgun. Thank you all for your input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,617 Posts
Alex:

There is a fine line between the best stock fitters and instructors. The best ones will indeed ask what types of shooting interests you and the amount of each you will be doing.

The main differences in stock dimensions will be determined by how high you want the gun to shoot above its point of aim and whether or not the gun is likely to be shot from a low gun position.

I would suggest that you consider a 60/40 point of impact; it would allow you to avoid having to cover rising trap and skeet targets to create the necessary vertical lead. That POI will also allow you to shoot dropping sporting clays targets with little trouble.

With many sporting clays shooters wanting a slightly shorter stock, it shouldn't cause you trouble regardless of what you decide. The slightly less pitch that low gun shooters often want for overhead targets and faster mounting, should also be a somewhat moot consideration.

Ask the stock fitter what his recommendations are, why he recommends each dimension, and any possible disadvantages for each recommendation when shooting other shooting disciplines. With a good stock fitter, you should be able to accept his recommendations with neither concern nor second thoughts.

Rollin
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,123 Posts
I think it should come in this order.

1. Instructor to make sure you have proper stance and form.

2. Gun fitter to help your gun fit better to make shooting more fun.

3. Instructor again to help you get what you wanted in the first place, to be a better shot.

Correct me if I'm wrong.

Good Luck!
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top