Shotgun Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone else had a problem with their Grabber not returning to the 'Home' position (top of stroke) because of the square shaft in the center post binding?

This is after the bottom roller leaves the actuating fork for the collet so it is not lack of lube on the sizer or sizer related. There is plenty of lube on the square shaft so that is not the problem either. I think the shaft may be bent or has a burr or may be slightly oversize or whatever!

I did a search and found one instance and that problem was lack of lube on the sizer but that is not the case here. The spring simply will not return the tool head to the top of the stroke without physically pushing it there.

I sent the question to MEC but have not heard back from them yet.

This, BTW, is a nearly new loader with maybe 5 boxes through it. Is this normal and the loader requires some kind of "break in?"

Any MEC experts out there?

Any help or comments would be appreciated.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,358 Posts
There is an actuating rod in the backside of the center post that slides up and down in the post to actuate the resizer.

Possibly that rod is bent or dry, needing lube, and is causing the binding at the top of the stroke.

Another possible cause is linkage being too tight at the thru bolts. Check that there is nothing obstructing the linkage, like an overrun of a weld on the upper frame, and check that the thru bolts aren't too tight and are lightly oiled.

DLM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks, DL, for the response! All operations work freely until the tool head tries to drag that center shaft to the up position.

I definitely agree there is something wrong with the shaft - bent, burred or oversize. There is plenty of lube and I even flushed a tad with RemOil to see if there was a change. No help.

How difficult is it to R & R the center shaft? I don't particularly want to return it to MEC and would like to try and repair it myself.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,358 Posts
You pretty well have to disassemble the machine to get the shaft out. A little hard to explain step by step.

Sending it back to MEC may be your best bet as they will repair it free of charge and pay the return shipping. Their turn around time is excellent. Usually 1 or 2 days so that shouldn't be a problem for you.

DLM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,159 Posts
DLM's advice is sound.

If you can't find some simple and obvious solution to the problem, you do not want to disassemble and try to reassemble a Grabber or 9000.

By the time you managed to accomplish that you could have sent the machine to MEC and already got it back much sooner.

Fixed.

And even if you did disassemble the machine, there's no guarantee you could identify the problem.

Save yourself some major headaches and send it to MEC.

For easier and safer packaging, don't send the bottles and primer feed.

I took one of those things apart once several years ago and it was a nightmare getting it back together.

Still didn't work right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Well, guys, I was in the basement and didn't see your latest posts.

An hour and a half later, one minor overhaul and thorough cleaning, I am now somewhat conversant with the lower half of a Grabber!

Problem: badly bent actuator bar.

Solution: I could sight down the bar and (somewhat exaggerated) it looked like a dog's back leg! Put it in the vise and leaned on it (gently) and it is now straight and slick in the slot!

Disassembly wasn't too bad as long as you compressed the springs properly and took care to remove them slowly! Otherwise things would go flying all over the place.

It is now operating slicker than it ever has!

OCH
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
23,249 Posts
chukarhunter said:
Well, guys, I was in the basement and didn't see your latest posts.

An hour and a half later, one minor overhaul and thorough cleaning, I am now somewhat conversant with the lower half of a Grabber!

Problem: badly bent actuator bar.

Solution: I could sight down the bar and (somewhat exaggerated) it looked like a dog's back leg! Put it in the vise and leaned on it (gently) and it is now straight and slick in the slot!

Disassembly wasn't too bad as long as you compressed the springs properly and took care to remove them slowly! Otherwise things would go flying all over the place.

It is now operating slicker than it ever has!

OCH
Good work! Clearly you have the same mentality that I have, I figger that a human built it, and they can't be that much smarter than me. Even if they are, I can still learn and do frequently.
Hats off to yew.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,358 Posts
Good deal!!! The Mec's are not all that complicated, if you are mechanically inclined and watch what you are doing. Then reassembly can be accomplished with relative ease.

Your problem was as I had suspected, since I have seen several of these before, but you never really know unless you in fact do disassemble them.

Good job !! Now enjoy the machine.

DLM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My only concern is that it left the factory that way. I am glad, however, that it was easily (sort of) fixable.

I have seen several different recommendation for non-seizing grease for the collet. Is one any better than the rest? Outers?

OCH
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,159 Posts
chukarhunter said:
I have seen several different recommendation for non-seizing grease for the collet. Is one any better than the rest?
I use Synco Chemical Corp.'s Super Lube for that and everything else — O/U hinge pins, threads on percussion cap revolver nipples, threads on string trimmer heads, etc., anything that needs grease with an anti-seize quality.

It's clear and clean to use, contains Teflon and withstands temperatures of upwards of 500 degrees.

Comes in 1/2 and 3 oz. tubes, the 3 oz. at about $8 being by far the most economical.

It's something of a miracle grease and the best I've ever found.

 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
23,249 Posts
Case said:
chukarhunter said:
I have seen several different recommendation for non-seizing grease for the collet. Is one any better than the rest?
I use Synco Chemical Corp.'s Super Lube for that and everything else - O/U hinge pins, threads on percussion cap revolver nipples, threads on string trimmer heads, etc., anything that needs grease with an anti-seize quality.

It's clear and clean to use, contains Teflon and withstands temperatures of upwards of 500 degrees.

Comes in 1/2 and 3 oz. tubes, the 3 oz. at about $8 being by far the most economical.

It's something of a miracle grease and the best I've ever found.

I tried that in the past, and then I tried, Tri-Flow grease and it seems to hang around longer and the collet seems to require a longer interval before it starts sticking again. Never fully satisfied, I am trying STOS to see how it holds up. I am using it on my 20 Ga. 9000gn, but due to the increased thickness of the sizer, I think it has less of a chance of sticking. The 12Ga always seems to have a shorter interval between lubes, regardless of what the lube is. So far all that we have listed are far better than the anti-seize/ never-seize/Mec branded lube. The best use for that is staining everything that is stainable. In that respect it as worse/better(?) than Prussian Blue compound. It smears, spreads and stains far better than it lubes a Mec Collet. While it is a great product for many applications, lubing a Mec collet and closer is not one of them. Just my experiences, and not intended as a source of argument.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Surprise, surprise!

Well, I just spoke to tech assistance at MEC and the bend in the actuator bar is an integral part of the design! Definitely not my idea of engineering design excellence but they deliberately put a kink in the bar to put some drag on it in the slot to prevent the collet from snapping open.

He said there is a notch about halfway up the bar that allows for manufacturing to put a kink in the bar to create the drag necessary to slow the opening of the collet. There are certainly any number of ways to create the necessary drag but deliberately bending the bar is pretty far down on the list!

After I 'fixed' the bend in the bar, the collet was opening way too fast. I think I will put a piece of greased felt in the notch to provide some braking and slow the collet. BTW, the snapping collet will cause the primer to jump out of its hole in the turret.

Amazing!

OCH

Edit: A little patch of felt cut to size and pushed into the notch works beautifully. Provides just the right amount of braking without creating so much drag (as the bent bar did) as to not allow the tool head to easily go to the 'home' position.

Second edit: When I disassembled my reloader, I noticed quite a bit of wear in the channel and on the bar, but my bar was seriously kinked and I had to push the handle up to the top of the stroke. There are a ton of Grabbers out there that will eventually wear the bar/channel until enough slop occurs so that one will have to go back in and bend the bar some more to keep primers from jumping out of the turret when the collet snaps open. I suspect this problem exists already.

You may draw your own conclusions!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
153 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Bend to size, hammer to fit, paint to match!

Yep, the old rule applies, you get exactly what you pay for!

OCH
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top