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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The future of all sports relies on the involvement and participation of juniors and ladies. When it comes to the ladies and juniors, there is a misconception about what equipment they should use. Time after time, I see a junior or lady sportsman try to shoot the wrong equipment for them. The gun rocks back and knocks their arm off. The gun jumps up and slaps them in the face. They start missing targets as a result or, worse, they're afraid to try to shoot any more. Inevitably, they quit shooting. The reason is the equipment they are using is not right for them. You can spend thousands of dollars for a nice gun, which you thought might be right for them, but if you didn't take the time to get it fitted to them or if it's too heavy for them, it simply won't work. The most common mistake I see with a lady or junior is when they try to shoot a 20-gauge gun. Many are very light and too easy to poke around with real control. The recoil is often way too much. Not all 20-gauge guns are the same. Look around for a gun that is the right weight for the person who will shoot it. Do they have a small or light frame? For a small-frame person, they need a light gun. The best choice is a good gas-operated automatic that has been fitted to them and on which barrel work has been done to reduce recoil. For the 20-gauge gun, I don't recommend getting the guns ported. On a small-frame person, they have a tendency not to eject the shell and the action hangs open. I do recommend getting the forcing cones lengthened and the gun back-bored which will help take our much of the recoil. For the 20-gauge over-and-under you need to get these guns ported. Also lengthen the forcing cones and have it back-bored. Make sure you choose an O/U that is not too light. Remember, the lighter the gun, the more recoil it will have. A good gun to start with is the 20-gauge Browning Gold Hunter automatic or the 20-gauge Beretta A-390 or the A-391. Have the barrel work done. I really like the Browning 20-gauge O/U the best, but the Beretta 20-gauge Silver Pigeon or the SKB 20-gauge with a good set of Briley custom-fitted chokes, if they can handle the extra weight comfortably, is by far the better choice. With the 28-gauge or the 410, you will find them a little more expensive to shoot but the rewards are worth it. The 28-gauge gun in an O/U is the king of the mountain. This gun has very light recoil, the best pattern of all the gauges and will break any target or take any game bird just as well as any other gauge gun. If the shooter has a larger frame and can handle a little more weight, then I suggest you try a good quality, gas-operated 12-gauge gun like the Beretta A-390, A-391 or the Browning Gold Hunter. You will need to have these guns ported, back-bored and forcing cones lengthened to take out most of the recoil. With the Browning Gold Hunter 12-gauge gun, it comes from thefactory back-bored, ported or not ported, as you desire, and with the forcing cones lengthened. It is a great off-the-shelf gun to start with. Either the Beretta or the Browning will work great for a lot of years, but do require cleaning more often the over-and-unders. When choosing the right ammunition, choose a shell that has light recoil and a good pattern. A 7/8 oz low powder load works well for 20 gauge. In the 28 gauge, the 7/8 oz loads will work best.For 12 gauge a 1 oz light load or a 7/8 oz load with high velocity is a favorite choice. The lighter load will break any target with a quarter of the recoil and without a doubt is the best choice for ladies and juniors. When trying to get a new shooter started, don't choose targets that are too hard. Keep them easy and work up from there. You must keep it fun. After all, it's for the enjoyment that we shoot to start with.www.shotgunsupply.com/article2.htm
 

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boy, that was timely!My wife and I are shopping for a gun for her.That was the moste helpfull batch of information we've found yet.Has anybody heard of or had experience with the Browning 425 WSSF model?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Check the lop against a gun that she shoots now, is it close?Specifications: Barrel Length 30" - Ported Weight 7lbs. 14oz. Rib 3/8" - 10mm Wide Stock dimensions Length of Pull 14 3/4" Drop at Comb 1 7/16" Drop at Heel 2 1/4" www.millersguns.com/brown...ecials.htmthey also carry the grade I....http://www.millersguns.com/grade_1_12.htm
 

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I just recently purchased my first new shotgun. I searched long and hard for one I knew that I would enjoy. I wanted a 12 ga. and I was also planning on getting a pump. This proved to be a very hard thing since all of the regular 12 ga. guns were rather large for me since I have short arms. Finally I found one that felt good on me, which happens to be a Mossberg 500 field 12 ga. Bantam. I'll have to stick with the youth models because they fit better and I don't have to stretch my arm out too far on the forarm... oh and by the way, if you are not a fragile person the 12 ga. won't be too much for you... happy shooting!:b
 

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Wow! What a beauty! Unfortunately, we were kind of hoping to keep it under $1200 bucks for the first gun. We think we will be doing a bit of hacking & bending to find out exacltly what she likes. Can't afford to go hacking & ending on one of those beauties.Any ideas?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The Beretta 390/391 is a great starter gun. Check at Seminole or Briley for some ideas as to what they can do to one.You don't have to do everything at once, but you can see what they offer. The benefit of getting one already custom modified is usually the price break of a combo over individual mods.Another option is to check at some of the larger shoots, you can pick up guns that others are getting out of, due to upgrades, too many guns(??? :) ), getting out of the sport, etc. That is where some great deals can be found. As well as being able to see a large variety of different guns and mods.www.seminolegun.com/www.briley.com/
 

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Excellent posting! Very helpful! I am right in the middle of researching a good starting sporting clays gun for my wife. She is focused on an over under based on trying a few. I have pretty much settled on a Beretta 686 Silver Pigeon 20 gage. I am in a quandary about sizing however. Do you have any recommendations for barrel length and length of pull for a 5'2" woman? I am thinking 28" for stability and sustained swing but might be slow and heavy for her. 26" would be faster, and maybe plenty stable for her size??? Would appreciate any advice anyone had.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Umm, how to put this politely.....I think that the LOP is going to be dependent on her body size. :eek: Really, her heigth is going to play a partial role as it relates to arm length, but how she seats the butt stock against her shoulder and how she puts her cheek against the stock is going to be important. Being short statured I would expect she will need to have some stock work done to make the gun fit her properly. If you are going to add extended chokes, this might be something to consider when you decide on barrel length, 26" should be fine. This is something that if you have a shooting facility close by that has a fitter or a good coach they can address the proper fit for her. Good luck and let her push you out of the way so she can join in the fun!! There is a fine line between hobby and insanity.
 

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Here are some of the observations I have made over the last year at two different gun clubs. First, there is a wholesale abandonment of over/under guns at both clubs in favor of semi-automatic shotguns (auto loaders).Secondly, Wenig has that new stock, the New American stock, that has a 3 inch drop to heel, 13.5 LOP, with a parallel comb, and the stock has other measurements to fit a woman and it fits many women. If the stock doesn't fit they will customize the stock to fit from your measurements. This allows women to shoot heads up.If a woman can handle a 12 *****, Beretta makes essentially this same idea with their Target SL and RL models and many women fit the RL (reduced length) models quite well and it has an adjustable butt stock.I'll even go out on a limb on this one. I, personally, think the Remington 1100 is one of the sweetest guns for women ever made because it is so thin. Put a Wenig New American for women with a 3 inch drop to heel, custom fitted, parallel stock so no cheek-slap, and you have one fine shooting machine.Any woman could pound 200 rounds per day with that gun and not feel a thing the next day.You pound 200 rounds with an O/U and you can call 911 the next day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The BT-99 is still in demand by many trap shooters, a couple of ladies in south AL have them. At the AL state trap shoot and all the local shoots I've been to, autos were few and far between even with the lady shooters. Some of the youths were using Beretta autos and there were a few 870s, sorry Jay I dont recall any Mossburgs. 2-3 of the top ladies were using really tricked out o/u's (Lujic?) with skelton style multipoint adjustable stocks and lots of colorful paint, not only could they shoot they looked good doing it :) .The older set around here that shoots skeet all prefer the older o/u's and the high end models with barrel inserts. Those K guns, older Browing superposed, and the Rem 32.When you get to sporting clays there is a noticeable shift to autos especially the Berettas, which I think is odd when you consider the "need" on some stations for two chokes.A properly fitted gun with a good recoil pad and with the "correct load" (this being a target load at sufficient speed and weight to do the job, many trap and skeet shooters are going to 1 oz and 7/8 oz shot drop-these have noticeably less felt recoil than the majority of the commercially available stuff) in an o/u it is not abusive as the additional weight of the gun and the lighter load allows for a pleasant shoot.My prefernce has allows been that the 1100 was heavy and blocky feeling, but I started with a 20ga auto so those 12ga 1100 field guns always felt like a lead block since I was used to the lighter gun....same as now, I prefer the Benelli as it is a lighter feeling gun. With Benelli having a 20ga now I would choose between one of those or a Beretta for a lady shooter.....atleast that would be the excuse I would use as those guns make for some fun dove shooting ;)
 
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