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Okay experts:

I was about to buy a new gun, but I was missing chukars and hitting ducks. So, I need solutions.

These are my guns with dimensions.

Beretta 20ga, 26&1/2" barrels, 6 lbs- 1&1/2 drop at comb/
2&3/8 drop at heel.

Uggi SxS 16 ga, 27" barrels, 6&1/2 lbs/ 1&1/4 drop at comb/
2&1/2 drop at heel.

Smith & Wesson autolaoder 12 ga, 28" barrels (plus 4" receiver), 7 lbs, 1&1/2 drop at comb, 2&1/2 drop at heel.

When I throw the S&W up and tuck my cheek in hard, i see only the front bead. Same with the uggie.

When I throw the Beretta up and tuck my cheek in hard I see the back of the receiver, no bead, no reciever.

I have shot skeet with the uggie and Beretta dn has a consistant 16 to 18 out of 25 with both guns.

But I miss all the chuckar with both guns. (Exhaustion from climbing?)

Never shot skeet or trap with the S&W, but dropped two ducks last weekend with two clean shots.

Is it me? The gun? the fit?

Opinions welcome

Thanks,

Dennis
 

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No doubt the Beretta has a common problem I see often, too low a comb and are likely shooting under birds. Even people that mount the gun and correct their cheek position to see down the rib, when the bird is in the air they tend to push themself into the gun. In that situation---and you eye on the bird, little question as to POI.

You need to build or go somewhere that has a pattern/POI plate, basically and usually, a steel plate erected off the ground, at least 4' square (not that critical) with a hole cut in the center.

There is a formula that is used at 16 yards from the plate, using full choke, for every inch off of center the pattern is, you move the comb 1/16" in the direction of correction. But, just knowing you need to correct with a pad or spacer, is usually good enough without going by the definition---just move it til you get the POI you want.

Especially being a bird hunter, stand off, pull the gun up and fire as you would on birds. It's rare for someone to not be surprised with the outcome when they haven't shot 10's of thousands of rounds thru a particular gun.
 

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Your sample is really too small to say for sure. Heck, I've killed 3 ducks out of a flock and then gone on to miss the next 10. But, TT makes a very good suggestion about using a pattern board so you'll at least know where you are shooting with each gun. It does sound like the comb is too low if you are looking at the back of the receiver instead of the bead.
 

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The impact board is a really important thing to do.You need a large blot in the middle upon which to focus and you take the shot as soon as the gun touches your cheek.However it is extremely important to have a very consistent mount built in before you go to the board.The above is the test of "does this gun for you shoot where you look".For a good mount ,no matter where the shots hit they should all closely overlay each other.Once in a while you will also run into prblems of barrel regulation so in a double gun shoot 5 shots with each barrel.

You could also find it very valuable to have an insructor along to watch your mounts as you put five separate shots on the board.
 

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Put simply, either your shooting form or the dimensions of your stock are incorrect.

I suspect that rather than shooting under targets, you are shooting over them. If the comb is too low and you make contact using too much cheek pressure, the natural tendency during swings is to raise your head. This would cause shots to go high. Raising your head would promote hitting birds when they are rising away from you but make it difficult to hit those that are crossing in front of you.

The reason this problem may exist is because the stock dimensions, at least the drop at the comb dimension, does not fit your apparently high cheekbones.

This is not the only possible cause, however. How you mount your guns may play a part as may inconsistent gun mounts.

Another possibility is the length of the stock and the height of your normal gun mount. Even how you you stand (your stance) and the width of your shoulders may be involved. If you tilt your head to the side to place your cheek on the comb or tilt your neck forward, the tendency is to straighten your neck and head during swings to eliminate the odd, unnatural feeling.

Head movement during swings is virtually impossible for the shooter to recognize. This is especially true when the stock's dimensions fail to fit the shooter. The same is true for your stance, gun mount and weight distribution when you shoot. Unless they are consistent, different problems can cause targets to be missed.

http://stockfitting.virtualave.net
 
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