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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been shooting trap for the past 6 months and I absolutely love it! I'm hooked for life. :)
I own a Remington 1100 12 gauge field gun with mod choke.

My personal best so far is 18 and really need to work on my consistency. I'm having diffiulty on post 4 and 5. I have no problems whatsoever on post #1. The hard exteme left angle target is not an issue.

I would love to see my scores improve. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
Vanny
 

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I suspect the difficulty on 4 and 5 is caused by one of two things: You may be arm-swinging your gun and moving the comb away from your cheek as you do it.
You may also be standing in such a way that you run out of swing distance before you reach targets. (Arm swinging can also cause your right shoulder to drop, which can cause shooting under targets.)

Solutions: Swing to targets using body rotation at the waist and hips, powered by the legs. There will be a learning curve but once it becomes natural, your shooting will improve.

Try placing your feet in a natural position, about shoulder width apart so a line drawn across your toes would be parallel with a line drawn down station 5. For most shooters, this stance works for all stations and is simple to use.
 

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The two most likely causes when i first started out was looking back to the bead and not keeping the eyes on the target (shoot behind) or disrupting the contact of the face away from the comb. (lifting the head.)

Also depending on if you shoot with one eye or two eye, you may not be seeing the target as well due to blocking the view of the angles with the barrel, getting surprised then rushing to make up for it and pushing the comb away from the face. You can experiment with different gun and eye holds to help you see the target better.

Crushing Left angles is natural because the the right handed shooter's gun is swinging towards the face. (less likely to lift your head).

Concentrate on maintaining consistent cheek pressure on the comb and not pushing the forearm of the gun after the target. as mentioned in a prior post your body head and gun rotate to the target as one unit.

Consistent mounting of the gun to the shoulder with your cheek on the comb in the same place every time will help with consistency.

Try to get someone that you respect as a shooter to mentor / coach you and to watch you and see if they can see what is happening when you miss.

Keep shooting and have fun.
 

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These guys are thinking the way I am. I have much more difficulty with left going targets than right going targets because I'm left handed. As a right hander, it's more natural to swing with the body for left targets. The right going targets cause you to push the gun away from your body and thereby lift your head or just lose the cheek weld with the stock.

When you allow your head to come off the stock, you feel like you have the right sight picture when in fact you are off a little. A movement as small as 1/8" can make a big difference out where the target is.

From stations 4 & 5 you will get more right targets. I believe this is why you are having more difficulty there.

Don't let it get you down. You will work on these targets and they will become easier for you. Then stations 1 & 2 will start to give you trouble. :wink:
 

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I think the advise you are given is the best. Some time during a practice round(s) you should just take targets from post 4 & 5. Shoot 50, 75, 100+ targets, why not.

Just curious, do you loose site of these targets by any chance?
 

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Try not to panic on the hard right angles. I used panic because I thought I did not have enough time to break the target. You actually have plenty of time. Get a good look at the target as it comes out of the house smooth swing to the target and your brain and eyes will tell you when to pull the trigger. Go to your home club and ask if you can shoot 25 off of 4 and then 25 off of 5 for practice. Remember relax and try not to jump the target. If you can't see em you can't hit em.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hello everyone!

Here is my long awaited response to all. Thanks for all of the helpful shooting tips! I definitely incorporated some of the suggested shooting techniques into my own. I am pleased to report that I have set a new personal record over the weekend!

I was able to pinpoint what caused my inconsistent performance on post 4 and 5. The inconsistency and frustration stemmed from an incorrect stance, gun mount, and eyes crossover issues.

First and foremost, I had trouble with the stance. I received numerous tips from the clubhouse members, but I finally figured a natural position that works for me. I addressed each station with the proper foot position and stance. Shoulder-width apart, supporting the body weight equally, feet slightly parallel with a line drawn to each position. I had a better set-up allowing my movement to be free and fluid and that means more targets hit.

Secondly, I made a conscious effect to keep my head down and maintain a consistent cheek pressure on the gun's comb. This helped me maintain control of the gun and reduce the recoil from banging my shoulder. When you allow your head to come off the stock to look at the target while swinging your shot, the target is lost.

It's nice to shoot with both eyes wide open, yet many can't due to severe eye crossover problems.
When I first started out, I had trouble shooting with both eyes open. So I made the switch and started shooting with closing my left eye. The inconsistency started to bother me, so my boyfriend suggested I should give shooting with both eyes open another chance. I should've listened sooner. :)
I was amazed how quickly I was able to adapt. I am glad I was able to transition from being a one-eye shooter to a two-eye shooter. One-eye shooting induce eye strain on the dominant eye and create "lazy eye" symptoms because the eye muscle is fatigued. Oh, the targets seem to move much faster with one-eye.

This past weekend, my boyfriend and I made two trips to the shotgun range. During our first trip - I shot 9, 12, and 13. The next day - I shot 21, 18, and 19. What a difference a day makes!

The key thing now is to establish a consistent performance. :D

Thanks guys!
 

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Well done! That's quite an improvement.

vannyc said:
The inconsistency and frustration stemmed from an incorrect stance, gun mount, and eyes crossover issues.
This is a lot to overcome. Stick with it and you'll be breaking 25 in no time at all.
 

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I got to give it to you those hard lefts i think are pretty difficult. All i can tell you is take your time and don't get rushed. I don't even have a choke in my old Springfield model 67d and i can still hit all the targets even after waiting a good bit of time i just take my time and follow through. Roby
 

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Well, assuming you are not gay,
so my boyfriend suggested I should give shooting with both eyes open another chance.
, as a female there is a huge chance that you have, or will have, eye dominance issues. Be very aware of that as you progress.

Put about a half inch of moleskin on top of your comb and see how that works for you on your field gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I am a woman that enjoys trap shooting. I should've made that clear in the beginning. You can call me Vanny Oakley. :)

Shooting with one-eye closed is a definite handicap. Shooting with both eyes open helps retain peripheral vision and depth perception.
I put scotch tape over the left lens on my shooting glasses. It works for now, but I would like to find a better solution to fix the eye dominance issue.

I have a bad habit of randomly stopping the gun. Not sure if there's a way to fix that. I just need to remember to keep the gun swing smooth and follow-through after the trigger is pulled.

Thanks *TrapShooter94r for the tip.
 

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I have a bad habit of randomly stopping the gun. Not sure if there's a way to fix that. I just need to remember to keep the gun swing smooth and follow-through after the trigger is pulled.
As a lefty I do that on post 1, which makes me truly suck there. I shot two rounds last Sunday on 1 and never did really get consistent. I plan on continuing to shoot at least one round a week on just that station to sort this out. If I can get that sorted out I think I can break 22 pretty regular.
 

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Shooting with tape is basically shooting with one eye. However, that doesn't mean that you are at a huge disadvantage. Since I converted from shooting with two eyes to taping one lense 18 months ago, I've posted 20 98s, 13 99s, a 200 and 8 more 100s in ATA competitions.

It is a heck of a lot better than I was doing shooting with two eyes. Consequently, like many of the top female shooters in ATA and on our international teams, you can have excellent success with tape. Depth perception is nice but it doesn't do you any good if you can't point the gun where you're looking.
 

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Jim Tyner said:
Put about a half inch of moleskin on top of your comb and see how that works for you on your field gun.
:shock:
 

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C5, she is shooting one eye with a field gun. She has to cover the target to hit it. This means she loses sight of most straight or slight angle targets. The moleskin will raise her POI.
 

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We know why you advised that....but, half an inch??

Besides, you can easily break targets by covering them with a flat-shooting gun. That's how she breaks them now.
You want her to change her sight picture at this early juncture? I say let her learn the game before she starts making changes like major POI shifts.
Just my opinion.
 
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