Shotgun Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been shooting for a while and been getting 20/24,18/24 in skeet/5 stand but a couple of weeks ago I did horrible and got 6/24! :shock: :x :cry: .I do know what my problem is though and it is my lead. I use a sustianed lead most of the time but some weeks I start shooting and point right at the target instead of remembering to lead the target. Is there a way that I can be more consistant with remembering to lead the target?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
541 Posts
Well there maybe some tricks that people will tell you but I say practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice practice.

It is one of the most fun parts of shooting and hey at least you have an excuse to get out to the range more if asked....... :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,228 Posts
I hope my advice doesn't totally mess up your game but here goes. I shoot using the pull through method. Once you get the rhythm down you will hardly ever miss. I learned to use it on grouse sized targets so when I shoot crossing clays I imagine they are a grouse sized bird. As you pull to catch up and swing though the target the timing should go tail tip trigger in an even cadence. The theory (I guess) is that you have to pull faster to catch a faster target and you automatically get the larger lead. It is hard to explain and teach, as it is more of an instinctive approach. If you can practice cheap maybe give it a try.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
19,862 Posts
To the first poster: Try this little tip when shooting skeet with sustained lead method. Before you call for the target, visualize the lead (forward allowance) required to break the target. Then, visualize an invisible target at this, say 3 feet, lead in front of the real target. Then when you shoot, shoot at the imaginary target 3 feet in front of the real target. This may help you to remember to lead the crossing targets. Later, as you gain more experience, you won't even have to think of it. You'll just do it automatically.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I often have that problem. I use the pull-through method, and make sure that I mimic the shot motion before each shot. It seems to me that when I mimic each shot before hand, I am more likely to keep the gun moving, and lead the bird.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top