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How do you like your birds cooked

1350 Views 5 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  Anonymous
Food of thought
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Well, I now have an idea of what some of you shoot at for game. How do you like your birds cooked up after the smoke and feathers clear ?? For myself; Grouse breasts coated with a mixture inside and out of olive oil, dry mustard powder, salt & pepper, a touch of Cayenne red pepper for interest, garlic and a splash of white wine. Grilled to golden brown. Served with butter browned bread crumbs tossed on top of home made noodles, pepper jack cheese and chives, sprinkled lightly with a malt vinegar. If I'm still hungry, a small glass of brandy with a piece apple raisen pie. Lazy Boy time man. Shells

cD Tanthalas
Shotgun Expert
Posts: 163
(9/25/02 6:20:53 am)
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Re: Food of thought
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i baiste my frouse with beer before i cook it (good for trout too) and then add summer savory to it with chopped onions and garlic

Shotgunworld
Forum Owner
Posts: 836
(9/26/02 12:23:12 am)
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ezSupporter
Re: Food of thought
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Hey Howie,
Here in the South we cook ours fried, deep fried, pan fried or if you want something different then you can always fry it.
Though I have heard of some implants that wrap a piece of bacon around the breasts and shiskabob (spelling) it on the grill. Add your favorite spices.
Jay Gentry
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"If it ain't fried then it ain't cooked"

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Rick618
Shotgun Expert
Posts: 227
(9/26/02 8:23:42 am)
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Re: Food of thought
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So far my best recipe for frying duck, dove, goose, deer, etc has been:

For the duck and goose I cut them into peices, one cut down the breast fillet longways, then 3-4 cuts across the grain, to end up with some 1"x1" - 1.5"x1.5" peices. I soak them in cold water to let the blood soak out, some folks use saltwater. Rinse and repeat a couple of times to get out the majority of the blood. This also limits the chance of a stray steel pellet.

Soak them in margaritta(w or w/o alcohol) for a couple of hours to overnight. Jose' or Margarittaville premix are my favs. In a plastic bag add about 2 cups flour, I add .5 packet of Lipton Savory Herb with Garlic dry soup mix, you can add or subtract this amount to taste. This is a fried recipe, so no we need a milk/egg wash and some hot oil.

Take the peices, dip in the wash, into the flower, into a pan of hot oil. Cook till blood runs out of the meat, don't cook till done as it will cook some as it sits and drains, and it gets tough if you cook till well done.

The margaritta gives a sweet taste and you can add some red pepper to the spices in the mix to bump it up a notch. Wives and kids that would normally not care for wild game will clean their plate.
There is a fine line between a hobby and insanity.

cD Tanthalas
Shotgun Expert
Posts: 208
(9/26/02 8:49:39 am)
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Re: Food of thought
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hmmm gonna have to try that one!

TheWingshooter
Shotgun Expert
Posts: 43
(9/26/02 1:35:59 pm)
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Re: Food of thought
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I generally boil everything in beer, put lots of spices on it, then fry it with bacon...then drink beer for my dinner instead.

--Wing

"If it flies...it dies."

Howie1049
Frequent SW Visitor
Posts: 30
(9/26/02 3:21:01 pm)
Reply Food of thought
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Wow, I figured that since everyone put so much into their guns and hunting, that they would naturely have these fantastic ways to fix the game for a meal. Was looking to pick up more and different ways to fix my birds for the table. Shells

TheWingshooter
Shotgun Expert
Posts: 45
(9/26/02 4:29:43 pm)
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Re: Food of thought
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Nah, for the most part we just like shootin stuff and drinkin. Cookin is for womenfolk.

j/k on the womenfolk

--Wing

"If it flies...it dies."

cD Tanthalas
Shotgun Expert
Posts: 216
(9/26/02 6:30:15 pm)
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Re: Food of thought
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hehe hey Jay i think we need a forum section for recipes and enjoying the fruits of our labour, maybe even mounting trophy info clothing, things that are indirectly involved with shooting?

Shotgunworld
Forum Owner
Posts: 859
(9/30/02 12:56:19 am)
Reply
ezSupporter
Re: Food of thought
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Hey cdTan,
Your wish is my command.
Jay G.
Shotgunworld.com
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By now everyone has heard of the West Nile virus right.The way I understand it ,you have to cook the birds at a high heat to kill the virus.Would steaming them first then browning them on the barbie,in the oven, or in pan make sense?
West Nile Virus is Not a Big Threat to Hunters
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: September 19, 2002
Media Contacts: Thomas Decker, VT Fish & Wildlife Dept. 802-241-3700
Dr. Patsy Tassler, VT Dept. of Health 802-863-7240
West Nile Virus is Not a Big Threat to Hunters

WATERBURY, VT - Even though catching West Nile Virus while hunting is a remote prospect, making plans for the upcoming game bird seasons should include precautionary measures.

West Nile virus is a mosquito-borne disease that can cause encephalitis in people, according to the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention. Birds are the natural hosts for this virus, which can be transmitted from infected birds to humans and other animals through bites of infected mosquitoes.

As of September 12, a total of nine different species of birds had tested positive for West Nile virus in Vermont. The list of positive birds include 12 blue jays, nine crows, one goldfinch, one house finch, one merlin, two robins, one common pigeon, three sparrows, and one Swainson's thrush.

Even though state and federal public health agencies consider the risk of contracting the virus from birds taken by hunters to be extremely low - there is no evidence that a hunter can get the virus from handling live or dead infected birds - some common sense safeguards can further reduce exposure, according to the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department.

"In response to concerns expressed by some game bird hunters, we have worked with the Vermont Department of Health to establish a list of precautions hunters can follow," said Tom Decker, Vermont's director of wildlife.

The following precautions are suggested:
Avoid getting mosquito bites. Use mosquito repellent containing DEET until cooler weather eliminates the insects.
Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.
Avoid taking birds that exhibit erratic behavior. Infected crows become sedentary, do not fly and do not respond normally to danger.
Wear rubber or plastic gloves while cleaning and handling birds and meat.
Thoroughly cook game bird meat. The latest Federal Food & Drug Administration regulations call for all game meat to be cooked to an internal temperature of 165 degrees F. (some sites say 145 others say 180) in the thickest parts.

"There is no evidence that West Nile virus can be transmitted to humans through consuming infected birds or animals," said Dr. Patsy Tassler, staff epidemiologist at the Vermont Department of Health. "In keeping with overall public health practice, and due to the risk of known food-borne pathogens, people should always follow procedures for fully cooking meat from either birds or mammals."
"Hunters should take precautions to protect themselves from mosquito bites," Tassler added.

Additional information on West Nile Virus is available on the Internet at the following websites:

U.S.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/q&a.htm

U.S. Geological Survey National Wildlife Health Center
http://www.nwhc.usgs.gov/
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Fried Ducky Breasts are MMMM MMMM MMMM Deliscious! I soak mine in milk over night to pull the blood and tenderize em a bit. Then rinse and dredge in your favorite breading. Mines the Uncle Bucks from Bass Pro and now available at Publix grocers in the south, may also be found in some Krogers. Drop them breasties in a pan with some good hot oil and let em swim until they float (I give mine another minute or so, don't want no salmonella). The Uncle Bucks breading is a little spicy so use whatever you and your family prefers. My family eats it up just like candy! And as we say round here, "Ain't no bugs that can handle a swim at 375 degrees." :lol:
My favorite is pheasant cut in half and grilled slowly over mesquite coals served with green salad and wild rice. I generally marinate the bird for a couple of hours in either Oriental or Cajun. The sweeter Oriental style makes a nice crispy crust on the bird while the Cajun just makes a proper sweat when done right.

My youngest kids favorite is quail pot pie. They like any pot pie but I think they just like to say quail pot pie so we eat quite a bit of it.

There was a pheasant fricasse in Petersen's that was fanfrickentastic. Here is a link to the recipe. You boys (and ladies) have to try this: http://www.huntingmag.com/cooks_shack/p ... fricassee/
G
Our latest dove cooking craze is to cook them up in a wok. Marinate the breasts for a minimum of a few hours in yer favorite terriyaki sauce, then cook 'em hot and short for truly delicious doves.

My group's old standby for doves is to pressure cook them with beer and onions. We usually dip them in flour and brown them in a skillet first - then it's off to the steam room.

Good stuff!
Chef
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