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:( I have been shooting skeet for about 3 months and the the best I have done so far is 17. Generaly,I shoot mid teens am getting frustrated as all get out.I can't afford a pro coach,so I guess I will just have to keep on trying.What is the secret?the puller today said I was shooting at the bird because I was hitting behind them mostly.He said I need to lead them more.. sj :cry:
 

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I've been shooting skeet for 3 weeks now, and yesterday I got my first 20. I usually shoot in the high teens. I wonder when I'll get my first 25, too, but I also try to not get too caught up in scores :D

The secret? I think the secret is to just keep an open mind and absorb what the experienced guys tell you. I was having some trouble with the middle stations until I got a tip from one of the old-timers that worked miracles for me.

But he also reminded me that not everything everyone tells you will necessarily be correct for you. You just have to take everything in and process it on your own.

Trying to improve on your own can be very frustrating because you're only guessing at what changes to make in your technique, so it's kind of a "hit and miss" thing, pardon the pun.

Don't be too hard on yourself, either. To be honest, I'm a horrible shot with a handgun, although I love shooting my 9mm. But I know that improvements in handgun marksmanship come a lot slower for me and take a lot more work than shooting skeet.
 
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If you're missing most of the birds on 3, 4, & 5, then you're not leading them enough. It seems unnatural at first, but lead the birds more than you think you need to, and then lead 'em a little more yet; it's damn seldom you see anybody miss a bird by shooting in front of it.

3 rules of skeet:
Lead the bird - Don't stop your swing - Keep your cheek glued to the stock. Break one of these rules, and you won't break the bird.
 

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After shooting handguns, Bullseye, for years, it got boring. So I just bought a shotgun and have been shooting for just over a month. Was shooting in the teens and then last week, I actually started to watch the clay instead of sighting over the barrel. Shot a 20 after missing three at station one. Got them all at 3,4 and 5, figured out I needed a 4 foot lead, almost seems easy. Watch the bird and merely point, no aiming.

I also bought a DVD featuring Todd Bender that uses an Eye Cam which sights over the barrel, so you can see what a good shooter sees. It really helped, although it was $60. Can't wait for the weekend and continue the quest for 25
 

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I started shooting skeet last year, and my first score was a 2.

This year I have shot 25 three times.

I think it helps a lot to master each station. Start with the easy ones like station 7...especially be sure to get the barrel so it covers the low house on the way up (shooting a bit high) so that you cover the clay with the whole 30 inches and not just the top of the pattern.

Bender has an excellent way to shoot station one, and that might fit your style....see the reference to the poster above.

I shoot low-gun, and the thing that helped me the most was the 11 part series on www.issfnews.com given by Tonino Blasi, and I think it might work for a mounted shooter?

Tonino says that the clay comes out of the stationary house, and it looks like it is going too fast (45 mph out of stationary house) so for him, the clay coming out of the house is just a signal to take ACTION, i.e., move the barrel to where you are going to shoot the target, the control zone. You see the lead and pull the trigger, and, yes, you will see the clay all the way there even though you are not looking for it.

Get a style that fits you, and that style will change as you find things that work better for you...don't be afraid to change and try different styles.
 

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I too am a lousy skeet shooter. While my sporting clays scores are respectable, I s**k at sk**t.

There I've said it, and now I feel better.

I'm intrigued by the "pull through" method. Someone in another post made mention of the fact that he doesn't lead the bird, but pulls through it.

Would anyone care to elaborate on that method?

Mike
 

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Pulling through, hmm? Everyone uses the names of the different styles a little differently, but here goes. The pull AWAY method refers to the style where one mounts directly on the target, rides with it for a very short while to establish the line of flight then smoothly accelerates ahead until a recognizable amount of lead is seen and pulls the trigger. This method, I feel, is best reserved for a long crosser where you have more time to view the target than you do at skeet. The SWING through, of course, refers to mounting slightly behind the target and sweeping the gun past it (along the same line the target is flying) then pulling the trigger. Different angles require you to pull when you are on the target, just as you pass it or after you see some daylight. This method is often said to make a shooter either a hero or a zero. You are either on or off-way off! There is no easy way to consistently duplicate your swing speed, and as you tire the swing will slow down. Most skeet shooters who shoot gun up (pre mounted) use the sustained-or maintained-lead. Those who shoot gun down are more likely to use a combination of the styles.
 
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