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What is recommended for good maintenance for an oil finished stock and forearm? Is there a really good polish on the market or you better off just wiping down the stock and forearm with a clean cloth?
 

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With any oil finish...gunstock or fine furniture...I would suggest an occasional wipe down with a product such as Old English Furniture Oil to keep the surface in good shape. A carnauba-based furniture wax should also be used to further protect the wood from water and superficial scratches, etc. If you've refinished the stock and used a product such as Tung Oil, then apply a new coat as the need arises. Practice looking at finished wood (furniture, paneling in restaurants, gun stocks, etc...and you'll soon learn to spot dried-out, dull wood that is soon going to split if it hasn't already.

good luck and good shooting
hunter20ga
 

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Hunter20ga is right, TQ: the best thing about oil-finished stocks is that all it takes to get them looking like new is another coat of oil--be it teak, or linseed, or some other combination. Whereas a lacquer, varnish, or uerethane coating will eventually chip or peel and necessitate a total stripping and recoating, oil is designed to be easily rejuvenated as often as one wants. One caveat: always apply this oil topcoat very sparingly--especially if it's linseed oil. It's often best to thin this topcoat, too. If you put too much on or it's too thick or you do not remove all the excess immediately, you will ultimately end up with a gummy, dull, dark finish.

I like to hit my oiled stocks about once a year with a very light coat of 75% linseed/25% turpentine, warmed to about 150 degrees in a double boiler. I rub it on--and we're only talking a few drops per side of a buttstock and a few more for a forearm--wipe off any wet excess after five or so minutes, and then immediately buff it with a soft cloth until the surface is absolutely dry. This is just enough to replenish the oil that's in the wood and reseal the uppermost layer to a watertight, glowing sheen. You'll see any light scratches disappear, too.
 

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A light application of tung oil is great. Don't leave it on too long because it sets up very quickly. If it gets gummy, just use some fresh tung oil on a rag and it will take off the previous coat. Remember...you must remove any wax and dirt first with a wipe down with mineral spirits first.
 
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