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Hi all,
Please forgive my ignorance on this subject. I have always picked up a sg and shouldered it and swung it a round a bit and even shot it a few times and knew what felt good and what didn't. Well after a lot or reading on this forum and buying a gun with shims I thought it might be time to understand the whole fit thing better. When and if do you change shims? How do you know if you have the right LOP? How does drop at heal and drop at comb play into thing? Is there any science behind all this or do I just go with what feels right?
Thanks again,
Danny
 

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lonepalm - Buy the book "Stock Fitting Secrets" by Rollin Oswald - you'll be glad you did! http://stockfitting.com/

Since fit is integral to mount and "the mount is the shot," the subject is far more involved than it might first appear to be. Rollin is dedicated to helping enable others understand and achieve what will be their uniquely perfect fit. Excellent.
 

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+1 for sidelock's recommendation of Rollin's book.

Also, unless the gun is really close out of the box, the shims aren't going to do the job for fitting the gun to you. You'll most likely need an adjustable comb and possibly an adjustable butt plate. That's where the real fitting comes in. Shims are mostly a marketing gimmick, unless if and only IF the gun happens to be very VERY close out of the box. Otherwise you just can't get enough adjustment out of the shims if you're serious about fit.
 

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Follow sidelock's advice and get the Oswald book. Also, in my opinion, Ken Davies' book The Better Shot is perhaps the best one that really tries to teach you how to use a shotgun.

In my experience, and in the opinion of those far more knowledgeable, there are a few very important things to this issue:

You have to know the proper way to mount a shotgun. This has to be intuitive and the same every time you mount.

The best way to get fitted is to have a fitter with a "try gun" spend a few hours with you.

This is why you have to already have a reasonably good form, since when you get fitted it won't work if every time you shoulder a gun you do it a little bit different.

Most guys I see shooting have terrible form - they scrunch their bodies and hunch over to fit the gun. THE GUN SHOULD FIT THE SHOOTER

Yes, it is time-consuming and a bit expensive to get fitted and then have your stock modified, but it makes such an enormous difference!

You can become a reasonable shot with a poor-fitting gun, but if you have one that fits perfectly, it is such a joy just to shoot it that it cannot compare with shooting an ill-fitting one.

I think (but can't prove) that many of the complaints about recoil are the result of poorly fitting guns. A well fit gun's recoil is felt much less. I once spent a day shooting someone else's 20ga sxs and at the end of the day my shoulder was black/blue and my cheek was slapped silly. I can put a hundred rounds thru any of my fitted 12 ga sxs guns and not have the least soreness even if I'm only wearing a shirt.

The dimensions, LOP, drop at heel, drop at comb (Brits sometimes call drop "bend") cast and pitch are all interrelated - it is not very fruitful to try to ascribe functions to each in isolation. The Oswald and Davies book will make it all make sense.

Good luck - you've had your epiphany! You are now entering a new world of shooting!
 

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Mike, for all I agree with you on I disagree with the post above.

I was able to move my 391 Sporting stock quite a bit with factory shims. I did order one or two not included but available by calling parts.

I am quite impressed by the shim system and would like to see it on your basic Citori and 686 Beretta line. If you don't want the weight and expense, and assuming you don't need a LOT of change, you can dial in a hunting gun to fit like a charm.
 
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