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Some people would like to know what the trigger pull weight of their gun is but don't have a trigger pull gauge and don't have a gunsmith nearby to measure it for them. In that case, here is a simple way to determine the trigger pull weight of your gun within a couple of ounces.

First, obtain a lightweight plastic gallon jug (such as an empty milk jug) and a measuring cup. A small funnel would also be useful. You also need some string and your EMPTY gun.

Now begin measuring water and pouring it into the jug. One cup is 8 ounces, so two cups would be a pint which is 16 ounces. After you've put two cups (16 ounces) of water in the jug and with the jug sitting level, make a mark on the outside of the jug at the level of the water. Then put a "1" beside this mark to represent one pound.

Then add another 16 ounces of water and mark the jug and label it "2". Continue with this method until you fill the jug which should take 128 ounces and would equal 8 pounds. Now you should have a jug with marks for each pound from 1 to 8.

Now take some string and tie it to the handle or neck of the empty jug and make a loop and put it around the trigger such that the jug will hang freely (without binding) below the butt of the gun.

Now all you have to do is start adding water slowly to the jug as you hold the gun with the muzzle straight up in the air and the weight of the jug and water suspended from the trigger. Of course, the trigger of the EMPTY gun must be cocked first. Continue to add water slowly until the hammer falls. While adding water, don't make any sudden jerks or movements of the gun or water jug since this will create an impact load and give false results.

Once you've found out just how much water it takes in the jug to pull the trigger, then simply sit the jug on a level surface and read the level of the water according to the marks you previously made on the jug. Once you've read the weight according to the marks, I suggest that you add 2 ounces to your reading to compensate for the weight of the jug and to correct for weight of water which is about 8 pounds 3 ounces for one gallon.

That's all there is to it. Do this procedure several times since the trigger won't likely break at the exact same weight every time. This method will give you a pretty close reading (within 2 ounces in most cases) and that's about as close as most trigger pull gauges.
 

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Hold your empty gun by the trigger, barrel pointing down. If the gun doesn't fire, then your trigger pull is greater than the weight of the gun. Good way to test cheap guns.
 

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Or you could just do the jug thing and weigh the jug after the trigger pulls... Use a bathroom scale. Weigh yourself holding the jug and the just yourself. Subtract. Or just weigh the jug. Although the latter is not as accurate as the former. B-b--b----b

You could also find the spec sheet for you weapon.

Or feel it out. You know what 3 lbs feels like compared to 5... How accurate do you need to be?
Just pull the trigger. Is it soft? Normal? Hard? What's that weigh? If unsure, do the jug thing with you finger... Get a second opinion or two if in doubt and then average them out. (Add them all and then divide by the number of opinions including your own if appropriate.)

You got This.

There you go.

And really what difference does it make at this point?
 

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Or you could just do the jug thing and weigh the jug after the trigger pulls... Use a bathroom scale. Weigh yourself holding the jug and the just yourself. Subtract. Or just weigh the jug. Although the latter is not as accurate as the former. B-b--b----b

You could also find the spec sheet for you weapon.

Or feel it out. You know what 3 lbs feels like compared to 5... How accurate do you need to be?
Just pull the trigger. Is it soft? Normal? Hard? What's that weigh? If unsure, do the jug thing with you finger... Get a second opinion or two if in doubt and then average them out. (Add them all and then divide by the number of opinions including your own if appropriate.)

You got This.

There you go.

And really what difference does it make at this point?
Are you being sarcastic, condescending to the OP or just ignorant of firearms?

I’m having a little trouble figuring which.

Not a good first post, IMHO.
 

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Seems like a lot of fiddling around when you can get a trigger pull gage for around $25 bucks on Amazon. I do the upside down gun thing to see if overly heavy. That said, I’ve never sent a shotgun off to have trigger work. Once you find out exactly what the trigger pull weight is what do you do with the information? If you suspect the trigger is heavy why not skip the measuring and just send trigger in for work? There are likely creep issues too. Not sure what knowing the exact break point is worth other than as some gauge to original OEM quality.
 

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The water and jug method will work, but it’s awfully tedious. For those who only own 1 or 2 guns, aren’t in need of exact trigger pull weights, and have no intentions of getting any more in the future, this method may be worth using. However, a wheeler trigger gauge can be purchased on Amazon for $20. If it’s important enough to know the trigger pull weight of a gun, that’s a nominal one time fee.

Exact trigger pull weight is more important for rifles and handguns than it is for shotguns, but a good trigger scale can be useful to weigh things other other than just the trigger pull. The weight of the entire gun for example. I even use mine to weigh my backpacking gear.
 

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Interesting. After all these years on planet earth I did not realize liquid ounces and ounces of weight were equal for water.
Close enough in this instance . Ulysses put a helpfull post up. What type of people want to tear that apart on such an OH so friendly forum ?


Step 1 of 3
a) A pint of water weighs 1.04 pounds, so 1 pound of water is 0.96 pint. A merchant sells water in containers weighing 0.5 pounds, but customer can fill them to their liking. It is easier to weigh the filled container than to measure the volume of water the customer is purchasing. X is defined to be the weight of the container and the water and y to be the volume of the water.
We need to write the equation the merchant would use to determine the volume y when x is known.
The merchant sells water in containers weighing 0.5 pound.
The weight of container is 0.5pounds.
It x is the weight of container and the water and y is the volume of water then the volume of water would be x minus the weight of the container.
Thus
.
Also, 1 pound of water is 0.96 pint.
So, in pints,

Hence, the equation the merchant would use to determine the volume y when x is known is
.
 

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Why do you need to know poundage of a trigger?
Some guns come with excessive trigger pulls which can delay the exact timing of your shot, causing a miss. Extremely hard pulls can pull your shot, causing a miss.
Too light of a trigger can be dangerous, causing you too shoot prematurely or even worse, an accidental discharge.
Experienced shooters know fairly closely if a trigger pull is acceptable. Novice shooters may not.
 

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Gentlemen,
I use the Lyman Electronic Trigger Pull Gauge, they advertise it as the most accurate trigger pull gauge made.
Instructions come in the box. Simple to use.

all the best,

Pine Creek/Dave
L.C. Smith Man
 

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I have a Lyman trigger pull gauge, I use it for handguns, and rifles. I have checked a few of my shotguns, my Maxus started out at 8 1/2 pounds, my CZ Canvasback is 3.5-4 pounds, which is way to light for me, I actually prefer a 6-7 pound shotgun triggers, but the Maxus 8 1/2 pound was no problem. It is not really something I bother checking on a shotgun. But if you do not have a gauge, and you really need to know, the above way will get you pretty close.

cdb
 

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Put the butt of the gun on a scale and carefully balance it with your off hand so that you get a steady gun weight. Carefully put pressure on the trigger till the hammer trips. Note the scale weight at that point. Subtract gun weight from hammer trip weight, you have trigger pull weight. Easy peasy.
 
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