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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
That should be an easy one for you guys:

I bought a used reloader and the guy sent it along with bunch of hulls. They are old, but appear in very good condition (most of them).

They are baseically 4 types and I want to be able to properly identify them to look up data in the manuals:

1. Red Western AA (same as the Winchester AA?)
2. Blue Peters
3. Green Peters
3. Black Remington

All low-brass

Since I haven't seen these hulls around in the stores, I tought I might ask around - I bet some of you guys used to reload them, or are still doing it...
 

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The best way to check these hulls (age?) is to look inside at the base......is it solid plastic or is there a base wad. All AA hulls can be used with AA data. The Peters hulls (both colors) should be all plastic and are tapered inside. One should use RXP wads for best results. Check the black Remington hulls.......if they are tapered use the RXP wad, if they have a basewad...use the std. Power Piston. Do not use fiber cut wads in hulls that have a tapered sidewalls inside. Best Regards, James
 

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The remingtons you named all sound like one piece hulls. Easy to tell - look inside them with a flashlight. If there's no seperate base wad then they're one piece and can be reloaded with STS/Nitro data (All one piece remmies are the same)

Your winchesters can be used with ANY AA data. Weather they're new or old AA's they can be loaded the same.

Once you get set up to load you can transition from one hull to another pretty easily without any modifications to your loader. Many of the AA/Remington loads are interchangable as well, just check with your powder manufacturer's recommendations and USE A SCALE for weighing your powder!!! Bushing recommendations are not always that accurate!
 
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If the hulls are clean and the brass isn't corroded, you have some excellent hulls to learn to reload on. But be sure to check the crimping petals to see how pliable they are and that they're not brittle. If your hulls are pliable and flexible, you're in good shape!

Also when identifying a shell I must be the only one on the board that does this, is that I'll frequently cut open a hull to more close examine the inside. Yes this destroys the hull from ever being fired again, but it still becomes a valuable reference tool for the future. And besides, if the hulls I do this to are "free," what did it really cost me to better see the inside of a hull I have questions about?
 

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I've cut a couple open myself but I usually wait until they're pretty worn out before I do that.

As far as the crimp being nice and pliable and pillowy soft the best way to tell that is to shoot it over and over and over until it's just plain worn the heck out. Then and only then is the hull "worn out".

You got some good goodies. Have fun! :D
 
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"Pillowy soft?" Are those must be Charmin hulls? Clayslayer? :lol:

If the hulls are "crunchy" as opposed to pliable and flexible, that's the signal to throw them away. Usually the crimps will start to crack by that time and often have pin holes in the crimp-folds.
 

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Nah I think Charmin quit making hulls a long time ago :D

Small splits and occasional pinholes don't really matter. If the hull crimps, it shoots. I've chroned a bunch of loads from once fired hulls and and a bunch that were so ugly that if shaken they'd fall apart, had splits that showed over half of the wad column, all 8 crimp segments completely seperated etc... and velocities were NOT significantly different (maybe 10fps or so give or take). I just wanted to see if they'd make a difference. They didn't.

I don't recommend shooting a hull until it looks like a Windjammer but you can if you feel so inclied to do so.
 
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