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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi, i made a post a few weeks ago about my hunting dog (black lab)... the general concensus is that she's too old to start training. Also, i guess it's arthritis but earlier in the year she tried to jump into the back of my bronco and couldn't make it, (its a high truck though), and she never tried again, i have to pick her up every time. and then the other day we took my dad's chevy, and its fairly low, she didn't even try... anyways, after a good hunt she's limping pretty good. so I know that it's not worth the time and energy to improve her tactics so I'll be looking for a puppy pretty soon. I think she's 9. Is it a good idea to get a puppy and bring both dogs out (after he's old enough and ready of course) so the older one can somewhat train the youg one... Other than recommending books is there any other pointers for dog training you guys might offer? thanks.
 

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You are getting yourself into a wonderful situation of bonding and love with your new dog. It is the most frustrating yet rewarding experience all in one. Reminds me of kids, get yourself a puppy and enjoy yourself.

I have two dogs and I use them to train each other BUT only for the good habits or skills they can pass on. Other than that you just have confusion and too many things going on to get any training done. Generally speaking you need to work with one dog at a time. It is OK and even good to have one dog watch the other dog be trained. They do learn that way but training two dogs at once will confuse them.
 

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I have found a pup/younger dog can breath life in to a older dog and even extend thier life.
I went through the same deal 2 years ago. With a 9yr old golden retreiver. Got a English setter pup that golden changed from mild to wild.
I did'nt think he would see 10yrs but he made it to 14yrs with a high quility of life.
And I believe the setter was responsible :D

Good luck to ya.

Scott
 

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2 dogs in the field, especially if not properly trained can be as bad as a pack of 6yr olds in Chucky Cheese.

Check with some local trainers if you aren't familiar with dog training. They can charge $250-400 a month but they do this professionally. They have the help and gadgets to teach the long marks as well as being money very well spent particularly with force fetching.

The Gun Dog series by Wolters is one of the best tried and true sets of books and videos if you want to give it a go yourself.

http://www.gundogsupply.com/-917-.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Scott231 said:
I have found a pup/younger dog can breath life in to a older dog and even extend thier life.
I went through the same deal 2 years ago. With a 9yr old golden retreiver. Got a English setter pup that golden changed from mild to wild.
I did'nt think he would see 10yrs but he made it to 14yrs with a high quility of life.
And I believe the setter was responsible :D

Good luck to ya.

Scott
I'll betcha the setter exploring this new world, just liek every other dog, ran around 24/7. Especially if your in the country, and the golden retreiver probably tagged along, and after weeks of this exercise, i would guarantee you that it was more active!!!
 

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My Gracie, a basset hound, is three years old. She was as stubborn as all her breed usually are. I found that the only way to train her was to go take her out with a pack of rabbit / **** dogs, and I do mean a pack. We went to the rescue agency from which we got her, and there was a whole faction of guys in the club who hunted with their bassets. At first, they told me that it might be a case of "that dog won't hunt." Some bassets just don't want any part of it and run off. The first pack had 11 dogs in it! But she is very gregarious and likes to play, so she got right into the game, and was anxious to please. She's learned pretty well. It was peer pressure, I think.

My only problem is that she's a fast little bugger for a basset--skinny, with none of the extra weight they normally drag around. Sometimes she's right behind the damn rabbit or even catches it, so you have to be careful where and when you shoot.

Best of luck with your good old friend the lab and the new puppy! They are so loyal and kind to us--who am I to deserve the devotion of a good gun dog? That's what I try to live up to in my treatment of Gracie!
 
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