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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone give me some tips on using a 28ga for hunting,and what kind of game i'll be able to hunt with this little gun,Thanks!
 

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Little quick flushing forest birds are often victim of a 28. Woodcock, bobwhite, chukar, close up grouse, released pheasants, pigeons, crows, rabbits, squirrels. Anything that requires a quick close shot. When I have borrowed one for hunting, it has been for walking forested loggin trails looking for grouse and quail. I have had my eye on a 28g wingmaster at the local shop, then I won't have to borrow one.
 

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I would try to avoid longer shots, especially if you are using an open choke for the quick close swats. It helps if you are an instinctive shooter, then you have time for multiple shots in case of a miss. If you take too much time to aim your first shot you might not have time for a second if you miss, especially in the woods. Also, keep quiet and listen for the birds. Lastly if you have a dog make sure it either will stay close if it is a flushing dog of it can hold a good point if it is a pointer. A good pointer would be great because you could get right in for a close shot every time. I don't have any kind of dog, so I walk as quietly as I can.
 

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i started hunting with a ruger red label 28 last year and fell in love with the gun. i honestly feel that this gun will reach out farther than most people give it credit for but if i were hunting ducks it would be with a 12. i hunt in a commercially licensed club in north west nj and we release chukars and pheasants. when i first started using the 28 i thought i would need help with long shots so i used modified in the first (bottom) barrel and full choke in the top. i did ok but i took advice from a friend and switched to imp cyl under mod and i got a lot more birds.

chukars give me fits with any gauge so i didn't improve with the 28 by switching chokes. however, i did very well on pheasants. in fact most of the birds i missed were up close. i did better when i let them get out a little.

i was shooting remington high brass 6's for most of the season. then i found winchester 28 high brass 6's with a 1 ounce load. this turned out to be a killer on pheasants. this 1 ounce load with the more open chokes worked for me. i also took the only rabbit i shot at tearing along a river with this load.

the only double on pheasants i made last year was with the 28. the second bird was paced off between 45 and 50 yards.

the way i see it, if a size 6 pellet is travelling at 1200 feet per second, it hits with the same energy regardless of wether it was shot out of a 12, 16, 20, etc. the difference is the number of pellets in the pattern. as the distance to the target increases the pattern density decreases. your odds of hitting are truly better if you get more pellets out there. but that doesn't mean if you hit them they won't go down. now i'm not saying to hold off until the bird gets out to 40 yards but for normal field hunting don't hesitate to shoot that 28. it may surprise you.
 

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One of the annoying things about 28's is the lack of ammo loads--another is that my particular 28, an 870 Express, only comes in modified choke. I'm looking into having a gunsmith cut the barrel a bit shorter and fit it for Briley chokes or something. Probably IC or Skeet would be best. It's a sweet little gun to carry and shoot, and I agree about the Winchester 1-oz. load of #6 shot, well worth the search. Let us know how you do!
 

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what about reloading and using hevi-shot in 28? You would have increased power and able to go further.
 

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These are great little guns. While I wouldn't advise hunting wild pheasant over flushing dogs with them they do make great small bird/game guns and are just a pleasure to shoot.

One thing I've found is that 28 gauge shooters here in bobwhite country are also some of the best reloaders I've ever met. These guns are expensive to feed. If you do, and you will, take a liking to your 28 your going have to get a second job to keep in shells or just pick up a MEC when you pick up your gun. Reloading will also give you the ability to cook up some hot loads incase you do get an urge to go hunt big sky country for a mixed bag of pheasants, huns and sharptails.

If you can find an old copy of Wing and Shot magazine (i've got a copy email if you like) there are some great 28guage recipes that fire some 1400FPS #7.5 hevi-shot loads you can use on bigger birds.

One more thing, go SXS on the 28 it just goes together like peanut butter and jelly.
 

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jlptexashunter said:
One thing I've found is that 28 gauge shooters here in bobwhite country are also some of the best reloaders I've ever met. These guns are expensive to feed. If you do, and you will, take a liking to your 28 your going have to get a second job to keep in shells or just pick up a MEC when you pick up your gun. Reloading will also give you the ability to cook up some hot loads incase you do get an urge to go hunt big sky country for a mixed bag of pheasants, huns and sharptails.

If you can find an old copy of Wing and Shot magazine (i've got a copy email if you like) there are some great 28guage recipes that fire some 1400FPS #7.5 hevi-shot loads you can use on bigger birds.

One more thing, go SXS on the 28 it just goes together like peanut butter and jelly.
JLP,

I just picked up a Mec Jr. for my 28. I've never reloaded before but I found a mentor who got me started. We worked up a load using 14.1 grains of Winchester WSF under 3/4 ounce of 6's for the field. I tried it out on the trap range with good results. I can't wait for November. Hulls are tough to come by though. I have around 4 or 5 boxes of factory ammo that I'm going to use up first. Then it will be strictly reloads for a while.

Reloading is fun. I wish I started that a long time ago.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I use a 28ga a lot. Mostly on Wisconsin Grouse, but I use it for Pheasants in Iowa too. Range is a small factor, but remember, the shot still leaves the barrel the same speed as a 12ga or other gauge. Don't use too large of shot. I use 9 exclusively on Grouse and Quail and often with a Spread-R load or brush wad to increase the size of the pattern. My Pheasant loads are 6, 7.5, or 8 shot. Bismuth is a must if you need to use non-toxic in controlled areas. I reload so Bismuth is reasonable. I even use my 28ga on late season wild pheasants. I keep shots a little shorter late season, 35yrd max instead of 45yrd max. 28ga double and a brace of setters - a match made in heaven. :D
 
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