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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, I've been shooting sporting clays for about 2 months with a Benelli Nova 12. I just tried skeet for the first time on saturday (shot 14/14/11/16, tell me what you think w/ a pump and an IC choke) and decided I need to get a non-pump gun. However, I have no idea which one to get. I'll tell you what I've seen so far.

Benelli
-Legacy
-Sport II

Beretta
-AL391

Browning
-Sporting Clays Gold (something like that)

Please tell me any others you like, or what you like about these.

I like the idea of the Benelli because of less maintenance and recoil doesn't really bother me. My range owner suggested the Beretta, and the browning just looks good.

These are all in the MSRP range of 1200-1400 which means I could get them for 1000-1100.

Will all three shoot 2 3/4 and 3's?

Thanks in advance,
-Barry-
 

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Jacobi said:
I bet your tired of this question...
So why not do a search instead of re-asking the same tired old question(s)?

Not trying to be mean, but well, the subject just called out for that response... Besides, you'll find plenty of good info already in here, some of which will not be re-entered, because people don't like to repeat themselves. I know - I've asked plenty of questions myself.

-- Sam
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've done a search on this topic, and on the guns, but having done the search I can say that these three guns, and the questions I asked, where not compared together/answered. I do appreciate you suggesting the search feature as I'm sure many users don't know what it is, but the reason for this particular question was to compare/contrast the above guns.

Once again thanks for any help,
-Barry-
 

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Jacobi,

Well, ultimately, you're going to have to buy the shotgun that your body feels most comfortable with. But I think you know that, and you're asking for people's opinions on these particular models...

In that case, I'll have to tell you that I've been shooting skeet for about a month now with my Beretta 391. I average around 19-20, but I did just shoot a 23 this past weekend (the gods were smiling on me). :D I'm shooting Winchester Xpert #7 steel shot through the Beretta Cylinder choke.

I love the gun. Mechanically, it's been flawless, but of course I've only put about 500 shells through it. I like the simple, classy look of the receiver: it's a gloss black framed by flat black. The wood isn't all that great, but I think that's the norm with all of Beretta's field guns.

The thing that most people mention as its one flaw is how hard it is to clean. That worried me a lot when I was shopping around, but now that I've done it a dozen times, I can tell you it's not that bad.

The gun does get very dirty very fast, but it's not hard to clean, it just takes a good chunk of time and a lot of cotton squares. But then again, I think I spend more time than most cleaning my guns, and I always remove and clean the bolt assembly after every shoot, which you really don't need to do.

You may also hear that the gas piston assembly is hard to disassemble and the trigger group is hard to remove at first. I haven't tried either, yet. I think the trigger group loosens up after the gun's broken in. The piston assembly just takes an extra hand, a rubber mallet, and patience, or so I hear. :D

If it fits you, I think you can be pretty confident that you're getting one of the best semi-auto sporting guns on the market right now.
 

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I'm new here, so I don't mind your question. I can usually get 18-20 in skeet with my 870 after the first warm up round. Are you set on an auto-loader? If not then go over/under. Can't get much simpler to clean and you don't have to chase empty shells. I got a citori a couple years ago and since then the 870 hasn't seen much use. You might as well get one now because if you keep up with sporting clays and skeet you're gonna get an itch for one later.
 

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Hey Jacobi,

MSCOTT is right about that!

After everything I said in the first post about how much I love my 391, I'm already shopping for my first O/U.

It's not because there's anything wrong with the Beretta, it's really just because the clay sports and double barrels are made for each other. The temptation is too great! :twisted:

In the long run, you'll probably save money by just getting the O/U now. Unless of course, you are a man of considerable willpower...!

I think MSCOTT has another good point in that a new semi-auto may not necessarily add another 5 points to your skeet score. I've seen perfect rounds shot with pumps. I did a round of manual trap with my friend's Remy Express yesterday, and even shooting doubles was no problem.

Believe it or not, with practice, you can work the action on a pump as fast, and sometimes faster, than a semi-auto. The only difference is that you have to train your body to make it reflexive. But since you've been shooting that Nova for awhile, I'm sure that's not news to you...

If you like the Nova and feel comfortable with it, you'll probably do better in skeet by just sticking with it and learning the game versus switching to a new gun now.

Unless of course, it's just an excuse to buy a new gun... which everyone on this forum understands!!!! :D
 

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When I went looking for a semi I layed a Beretta 391, Benelli Montefeltro and Browning Gold on the counter. Played with all three of them for about an hour and ended up with a Browning.

I liked the wood better, it seems pretty easy to clean. Not really that many moving parts. Lots of available chokes. Cool Browning Range gear that doesn't look like every one elses Beretta gear.

I've shot 18 cases of shells thru it and has worked flawlessly.

I've shot quail, ducks, turkey, pheasant, chukar, squirrel with my little Browning 20 and it's eaten everything I've thrown in it.

GO BROWNING you will not be disappointed.
 
G

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Jacobi:

Like Sander says, there's always a reason to buy a new shotgun :) BUT... that said, your Nova is a competent and durable firearm that will serve you well. I'd recommend that instead of getting in a hurry to pick up a double or autoloader, you buy yourself a whole boatload of shotshells and spend alot of time at your club shooting. That WILL make you a better shot, and the fast action on your Benelli will get even slicker. Also, you'll get to see alot of guys shooting different arms, and ask them about what they like/don't like. Even better, you'll get to see firsthand that most often it's the shooter and not the iron that's the key.
If you're still going to get that new non-pump, and you like your Nova, then by all means go for the Sport II, as they have similar fit characteristics. I shoot a Sport and love it dearly, but some days my Nova comes out to play instead, and there's nothing better than crushing a true pair of tough targets with your pump when your buddy drops one with his nice double!

Let us know what you go with, eh?
John
 

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A lot of good opinions have been expressed here. For the 1k range you can get into Winchester Supreme Select O/U's, Beretta Onyx O/U, or SKB's O/U. Now if you are sure you want a semi-auto, which is fine! I would argue you should stick to a, Beretta 391 or 390, Browning Gold Sporting, Remington 1100 or 11-87, or a Winchester SX2. (In that order). All the above listed semi-auto's are gas operated, by being gas operated they will cut down on some felt recoil.

I will assume your question of 2.75 or 3 is referring to the length of the shell and not the drams equiv. All the above semi-autos in their Sporting models are chambered for just 2 3/4" shells. There are hunting models of the listed guns that could handle 3" shells, however if you are just using it for clay targets you only need a 2 3/4" chamber.
 

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I have been shooting my sport II for about 3 weeks now and I love it. Stay with Benelli you won't be sorry.
 
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I asked the same question 2 years ago, and I went to the sporting clays range to find the answer. The answer to smooth and dependable operation was the beretta (at that time, it was the 390) I bought one, on the recommendation of the range owners, and the best shooters. I later won a 391 urica at a tournament, and it is also a fine gun. The consensus was that the reliability of the beretta was better than the gold hunter. But, more important, is to have the gun fitted to you, by a good gunsmith. Good luck!
 
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