Shotgun Forum banner
1 - 20 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,308 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm 65 years old. Skeet was the first clay game I learned when I was in my teens. Over the years I've taken breaks from the game but always seem to go back to it cause I just loved it. I've been averaging in the mid-90s for much of those years.

A couple years ago I was invited to shoot some trap by some great guys who shoot both games. I had shot trap a few times in the past but not routinely or seriously. I always preferred skeet. Now, I find myself actually looking more forward to my days when I shoot trap than skeet and it's starting to show in my scores. I'm enjoying the unpredictability of the targets and I've gotten to the point where my 16 yd trap scores have lately been better than my skeet scores. Last year I joined ATA and I have shot a few matches.

My shooting greatly improved this year and the reason for that I believe is I've changed my hold point to a slightly higher position over the house and I'm concentrating to keep my hard focus well out in front of the trap when I call for the target. I'm also much more confident and better at seeing those little leads that I used to confuse with a straight away.

I never thought this would happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,308 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Rudolph31 said:
I'm 65 too, but I'm just not a grumpy old man yet, so I don't shoot Trap.
They certainly do exist. I'm still having enough fun that the "grumpy while shooting" just hasn't set in yet. To get grumpy old me to come out, I've got to be watching the news (which I'm doing less and less). The guys I shoot with are fun, easy-going guys. I don't shoot at the clubs (including one that I belong to and shoot skeet at) that are run by grumpy old men who barely grunt at you if you greet them with a "Good Morning." At my other club, where I do shoot trap, they are friendly, talk your ear off, kind of guys. I often have to break away from an engaging conversation, with apologies, when my squad is called to the line. That just makes the breaking of clays that much more enjoyable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,782 Posts
twohigh said:
Rudolph31 said:
I'm 65 too, but I'm just not a grumpy old man yet, so I don't shoot Trap.
They certainly do exist. I'm still having enough fun that the "grumpy while shooting" just hasn't set in yet. To get grumpy old me to come out, I've got to be watching the news (which I'm doing less and less). The guys I shoot with are fun, easy-going guys. I don't shoot at the clubs (including one that I belong to and shoot skeet at) that are run by grumpy old men who barely grunt at you if you greet them with a "Good Morning." At my other club, where I do shoot trap, they are friendly, talk your ear off, kind of guys. I often have to break away from an engaging conversation, with apologies, when my squad is called to the line. That just makes the breaking of clays that much more enjoyable.
The companionship and comradery are definitely big factors with me. If I don't enjoy the fellowship, shooting is not nearly as fun. If you have to shoot trap to find that, I guess shooting trap would have to do . . . :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
When I rejoined the shooting club at 65 after a 20 year break the shotgun chairman asked what I was interested in. I said trap (in the past I shot some ATA). His line was "Your not old enough to shoot trap."

Bry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,103 Posts
Shot my first trap target in 1970 (Corning, IA) Registered targets in 1982 and now have near 250,000 ATA registered targets + another quarter million derby, league, trap targets. Shot some skeet and sporting along the way for fun. 73 years old and in good health.

Trap becomes your life. Your social life, volunteer life, competitive life. It is all I have time for. Every vacation, most all travel, volunteer 3 days a week for the gun club I was a founding board member of. Accomplished a high level of participation and success, many championships at the nations largest shoots. There is a 95% chance some old guy is going to kick your butt scoring in the next event. Grumpy old men have the time and money to play the game more often and some will be accomplished.

Am I a grumpy old man? You would think so if your causing a problem at the club or being a jackass. The other 99+% of the time I'm helping with every aspect of organized shooting. Helping to improve the game. If you don't know what your talking about, I will set it straight.

Maltz
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
216 Posts
Hi twohigh,

Trap shooting is an extremely rewarding sport. It requires excellent hand-eye coordination.

I've shot trap informally. Informal trap shooting requires skill. I could only imagine skill required to compete in tournaments.

I've once read the Kim Rhode practiced 6 hours a day and fired about a thousand rounds. That was serious dedication required to compete at tournament level.

I admire your dedication to a sport that's much more difficult that it appears. I hope you're Abe to hone your skills to compete in senior tournaments. I know you'd rather bust clay pigeons than play shuffleboard ;-)

I've recently read about a man who gave up his love affair with golf for trap shooting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Young or old, I was reminded today of why I like trap, when one of our members rolled out in his chair to shoot. It is a sport that is available to most and while breaking them all is the goal being able to participate can be oh so sweet. Shayne
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,752 Posts
I'm not ashamed to say it, I really like trap shooting. It's different than the other games. Instead of spending most of your time waiting for your turn to shoot, you spend most of your time waiting for your squad's turn to shoot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,142 Posts
I got all you old boomers beat! I'm 31 and I actually like sporting clays! For many years I was told that only rich people played that game and that I couldn't afford it. Well, when I first started deer hunting down in TX I was introduced to it and fell in love. The variety is way more fun than trap and unlike trap, I don't get uptight when I miss a target. In fact, missing is more fun for me than hitting because the target takes me by surprise. Almost like a ******* jumpscare! :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,292 Posts
twohigh said:
Westender said:
Insane ;-)
I know!
OP: If you get the chance to shoot some Olympic Trap you will really like trap shooting. Very addictive! I personally love to shoot Wobble Trap for the variety, and shot with a low gun using my hunting gun is near perfect practice for grouse and quail hunting.

Anybody that says ATA trap is too easy needs to remember that unless you can break them all; you are just an onlooker. Really tough to do!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,308 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
oyeme said:
twohigh said:
Westender said:
Insane ;-)
I know!
OP: If you get the chance to shoot some Olympic Trap you will really like trap shooting. Very addictive! I personally love to shoot Wobble Trap for the variety, and shot with a low gun using my hunting gun is near perfect practice for grouse and quail hunting.

Anybody that says ATA trap is too easy needs to remember that unless you can break them all; you are just an onlooker. Really tough to do!
None of the clubs near me have an Olympic/Bunker trap field. I recently watched the European Championships that were streamed on YouTube. The restrictions on gun and load (O/U with barrels no longer than 30" and 7/8 oz loads) were puzzling. The targets going at 77 mph looked extremely challenging. Also found what they called a hit was different. They don't need to see a visible chip or piece of the target to be called a hit. Just taking dust off the target or seeing a wobble or variation in trajectory after the shot was considered a hit and they used video slow motion reviews when challenged. If taking dust off a target was called a hit in Std American Trap, I'd have a lot more straights.

I understand the higher speeds are to make the game more challenging for the top shooters but American Skeet and Trap were developed as practice for hunting when limited hunting seasons were introduced. The speeds of 40-46 mph of std trap and skeet more closely replicates the speed of our common game birds than the 65-77 mph of Olympic/International Skeet and Trap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,292 Posts
ISSF RULES: ""HIT" Target
a) A target is declared as "HIT" when a regular target is thrown
and hit according to the event Rules and at least one (1)
visible piece is broken from it;

b) A target that is only "dusted," but from which no visible piece
is seen, is not a "HIT;"
c) Where "flash" (powder filled) targets are used, a target must
also be declared as "HIT" when there is visible emergence
of powder after a shot is fired;

It appears that you are correct with the use of "flash" targets only. All other targets must have a visible piece broken off just like in ATA Trap. No other rules that I saw about wobble or variation in flight being considered a hit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,308 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Oyeme,

Here's what I suggest you do: Go to YouTube and watch some of the recent European Championships that were held in Croatia last week. I saw where targets were declared hit when no visible powder was observed but that the target wobbled after the shot. Only the finals were streamed and flash targets were used. I was amazed at some of the targets that were overturned and called hit that were initially called lost using the VAR system.

Go to the link of the Men's Trap final below. Note: At the 23:15 mark in the video there is a miss that is challenged by the Italian coach and the VAR is used and the reporter/narrator states that the referees are looking for any powder or wobble or deviation in the target's flight. No powder is apparent. Both the reporter and the coach thought they saw a deviation in the target's flight path. The ref disagreed and it was still called lost.

At the 44:10 mark in the video the Great Britain shooter calls for a VAR review. No powder is observed and yet again they are looking for a deviation in the flight of the target. This time the thumb goes up by the ref as he thinks he sees some variation in the flight of the target and a hit is scored. In neither case could I see any evidence of a hit and would have called both targets lost. Watch and see what you think.

 
1 - 20 of 29 Posts
Top