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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry to ask, but I do need help. Please don't say "go run to a coach" as my last experience was expensive and virtually worthless. I will find somebody, but that won't happen for a month or so.

I'm right handed, strongly right eye dominant and yes, my gun fits.

L to R crossers are yielding too many "0"s for me. Even the puffball 30 yarder I worked on yesterday is causing me way too much trouble. I've done my research here and believe that:

(EDIT to add) I failed to mention that my 2d shot success rate with this target is very close to 100%.

A) Stance could be changed - more to the left?
B) We tend to push the forend with our hands - solution to really involve the hips and perhaps thinking about pushing the stock with our cheek?
C) Perhaps the weak left eye may want to get involved, so wait and insert/shoot later, but this is not an answer when the target must be taken early?

I can go out Sat morning and shoot 100 in a row...but would like to do so after a bit of advice from the peanut gallery here. Cheers....
 

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Get in front of it. Run with it longer.
 

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marist89 said:
Get in front of it. Run with it longer.
Agree with this. Not an option on all crossers depending on what the pair looks like but if there is adequate time I would be inclined to hold more to the right, let the bird run.

Actually experienced a smaller sample of it this morning. Zipped out to my home club for an hour instead of taking lunch at work to shoot my new A400 on the 5 stand field. On one stand there were two left to right crossers, one slow and the other with a lot of spring thrown on report. First round I was setting up too far left and getting beat badly by the faster bird. Hit 50%.

Second round I shot with mod choke and on that stand I moved considerably to the right with my hold point, turned my body maybe 10-15 degrees more right so I had comfortable range of motion to move the gun thru my new break point. Pushed my break points on both target out 15-20 yards. Doing so the targets slowed down visually and I felt no rush to catch up. I dropped one of the closer targets which I attribute to a poor gun mount. Hopefully my practise of that at home minimizes that issue for the 200 target tourney I have on Sunday.
 

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Could be lots of problems.

If you are running out of swing, then change your foot potion more to the right.

If you feel you are coming out of the gun, instead of using your arms, swing more with the legs- swing should start at the ankles and work up to the waist.

Try different shooting methods, swing through, maintained, pull away and see what works.
 

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Just a guess since it's almost impossible to diagnose without actually watching you shoot...

That said, IME the most common issue seen in newer shooters is -- you're swinging your gun faster than you're moving your head -- which as a RH shooter is also away from your head -- and thus your face is off the gun when you're firing. Doesn't happen with R>L crossers as you're now pulling the gun into your face.

The second most common issue is -- at a certain point in their shooting progress, usually about when folks learn to move the gun well, their perceived lead for crossers will cut nearly in half. (Too long an explanation here for the reasons why, but trust me :) ) Don't know exactly where you are in your shooting game, but given some of your comments I suspect this could be the case -- but it usually affects leads in both directions, so I'd still lean toward option 1 as the likeliest culprit...
 

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Do you have your lead foot pointed towards your break area/point ? Are you shooting pre-mounted-cheat mount or low gun ?
 

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I have been working on the Three Bullet Drill that Gil Ash recommends. It has been a help to me. You can find information and a short video on it with an internet search.
Basically what happens is through repetition your develop a habit of always having the shotgun inserted ahead of the target. It works for both left to right crossers and the interesting thing is the right to left crossers. Your brain starts to recognize where the barrel should be in your vision. I can't explain the science behind it, but I have seen the improvement in my shooting.
 

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Yep, that is the drill. Thanks for the assistance.
 

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Lefty Wilson said:
Yep, that is the drill. Thanks for the assistance.
{hs# :) I also like the flashlight drill for indoor mounting practice. Have done both more times than I can count :wink:
 

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K,

Your problem is very common for a right handed shooter. I read some good suggestions from xss, hopper and Jack. Left to right targets for a right handed shooter take more perceived lead simply because a right hander's swing naturally slows down because of the muscles, tendons and skeleton. As you swing from the right to the left all of these things sort of bind up and cause you to looses muzzle speed. As we know the slower the muzzle the more perceived lead we need to see. Opening your stance to the break point and even a little past it should fix your problem. Please feel free to call or email me with any questions. This is of course free information.

Mike McAlpine
The Clay Target Academy
325-656-6319
[email protected]
 

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Take your first shot where you are taking your successful second shot; Without seeing, it seems you might be behind
 

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Make sure you are staying in the gun, ( not lifting your head) focus on a small piece of the leading edge of the target and make a smooth swing. Get your brain out of the way ! And one more thing, don't let the target get in front of the gun. People that struggle with this target are usually getting beat by the target and then trying to catch up. Usually results in shooting in front of the target.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks all.

I'm believing the solution should be easily correctable. I'm swinging with my arms and the more frustrated I get, the more I exacerbate the problem by lifting my head and thinking too hard.

I also believe my 2d shot success rate is so high because I'm over to the right and forced to "get back into" the gun and rotating my hips properly.

(Insert is always in front, muzzles in the right place, low mount, I don't chase the target. On this puffball, I've been using maintained lead, but will alter this Sat with a simple pull-away.)

Hints to help include: Dry practice using body rotation, opening the stance to the right (or inversely closing it to the left), driving with my left knee, "pushing" the stock with my cheek and changing chokes every shot....

I will work hard on Sat to correct this.

Need 20 more chokes still, where are my $60 checks?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
oneounceload said:
Take your first shot where you are taking your successful second shot; Without seeing, it seems you might be behind
A wonderful thought, and (at the moment) were I shooting for score and were there time, I would.

At practice however, it makes no sense to me to repeat shots I can make with almost 100% success. I should be able to hit this simple target in the middle of it's level flight or a few seconds off the trap; virtually everybody here can (must be true because it's the interweb), and I intend to be able to also.

Cheers.
 

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Get yourself to a skeet field (station 4) get some instruction on how to break crossers. Of course gun fit,stance and gun mount should be perfected first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
lt0026 said:
Get yourself to a skeet field (station 4) get some instruction on how to break crossers. Of course gun fit,stance and gun mount should be perfected first.
THIS is why the interweb is so much fun...
 

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Don't rule out 'C'. It happens and I am living proof. I am "strongly right eye dominant".... until I'm not. The longer the target the worse it gets. I'm working on solutions. Don't get me wrong.... try other things first - they are more common - but if that doesn't seem to help much, you just might find that you could be one of the few, the proud, the intermittently cross dominant shooters. I'll be shooting with a dot for a while to see if it makes a difference - I've literally tried everything else. Last night I just started closing the eye for a longer incomers and I couldn't miss them, but it screwed me up on outgoers and doubles, so I walked around every station "open, close, open close"... and it was a PITA.... but I shot better....

As an aside, a great coach found this - I've been struggling a while. It took some time, a lot of shells, and a bunch of drills, but at least I know it's real now. A not so great coach would have struggled with you if this turns out to be the issue, so don't write off all coaches. Edge cases are tough.

Again, unlikely, but possible. It could be lots of things, but don't write it off. Take your time. Best of luck to you!!!
 

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And then when you learn to break them as singles from station 4 on the skeet field return to the SC course and shoot pairs. Your move on the sporting clays course to the first and second target could be causing your problem. Usually rushing with too much arm movement. Your wasting time and ammo. Get yourself some competent instruction.
 
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