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My father purchased an old shotgun about 25 years ago from this fellow who basically destroyed it.The guy sawed the barrels to 10" inches and cut the stock to make some sort of shotgun pistol.Then the guy got scared and took out all of the mechanisms and threw them away.Now I have it and want to restore it to it's former glory.So I need more information on this gun and find parts(if any available) so I can rebuild it.It's a double barrel hammerless 12 gauge. The only thing I can see stamped on it is "The Berkshire" on both sidelocks.Thanking you for time
Andrew
 

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Finding a set of barrels will be the first problem, second problem will be getting them fitted, they will have to be fitted to the gun. Getting a new stock fitted to a sidelock gun, if you can find a stock, mega bucks.

Way to much money, it'll cost you a whole more than the gun is worth, many times over.

I'd chunk it an look for another gun. Unless the gun has a lot of sentimental value. Then its up to you how much you want to spend.
 

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Jack: you'll note the original post was in 2006.
The Berkshire was a tradename gun, made by Meriden Fire Arms Co. (owned by Sears) for Shapleigh Hardware Co. A.J. Aubrey and Meriden parts guns appear frequently on the gun auction sites, but the gun has/will have little value even if made serviceable again.
See http://www.picturetrail.com/sfx/album/view/17474742
 

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The correspondent joined in 2006, Lord knows when this question was posted. Yes, the gun is an illegal sawed off shotgun and the only way to prevent a paid trip to Club Fed and the cross bar Hilton is to completely destroy the gun. Cut the barrels across the chambers with a hack saw or welding torch or crush them beyond use. If the gun was made by Meriden Fire Arms Co (1905 to 1915),it's at least ninety seven years old or if it was made by Andrew Fryberg, Manufacturing (1896 to 1910) it's at least one hundred and two years old. Either way, the gun is not worth restoring as parts, when and if they can be found will cost more that the value of the gun and if it is restored the gun won't be safe to shoot using modern ammunition. All you have is a useless piece of illegal junk.
 

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It says on the left that "dadew" joined Jan 3, 2006, at 12:41 pm and on the right that he posted his question on Jan 3, 2006, at 12:58 pm. If you check his "profile" you can see that was his only post here ever, he logged off one minute later and has never logged in again.
 

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Researcher01 said:
It says on the left that "dadew" joined Jan 3, 2006, at 12:41 pm and on the right that he posted his question on Jan 3, 2006, at 12:58 pm. If you check his "profile" you can see that was his only post here ever, he logged off one minute later and has never logged in again.
The good ol' "one & done".

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I have one of these shotguns (Berkshire) so it was interesting to know the history and was curious what the value is as mine is in very good shape (my father hunted with it until the late 60's at which time I "retired it" and even had a gun smith "tighten it up". I also have a set of L.C. Smith barrels that I was curious if they have any value (based on the prior information I know that you would have to find someone that had an "action" and needed barrels. Thank you for any info you may have to share.
 

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Greg
I sat here and wrote for a half and hour replying to your request. Then something happened and my response disappeared into cyber space, I wish I knew what the hell I am doing wrong. I'll be almost happy to try again. Now let's assume that your gun is complete and legal.
Be sure to take notes as there will be a test Friday afternoon. One must be careful to post the name of exactly as it is marked on the gun with no omissions, abbreviations, contractions or some word used on Saturn. I have three listings in one for or another for the name BERKSHIRE. (1.) (THE) BERKSHIRE, (2.) just plain BERKSHIRE and (3.) BERKSHIRE 3000. Gun No. 1 was made by either the Meriden Firearms Company of Meriden,Ct (1905 to 1910) or the Andrew Fyrberg Manufacturing Company of Hopkinstown,MA (1898 to 1910) for and was sold by the Shapleigh Hardware Company of Louisville,KY, a wholesale sporting goods dealer Gun No 2 and No.3 were made by the Crescent Fire Arms Company of Norwich, CT (1892 to 1930+) for and were sold by Shapleigh Hardware as well as No.3 was sold by Sears & Roebuck & Co. If your gun was made by Crescent, there will be a serial number stamped on the lower tang (the part that goes back into the butt stock) just behind the trigger guard. Give me that number and I can tell you what year the gun was made. Value? These guns were inexpensive (read cheap) even when new selling for $10.00 to $15.00. Wages were $5.00 a day. Their value hasn't increased that much over the years. Current value will depend on the guns condition, the amount of original finish remaining on the metal and wood as well as the mechanical condition. A prime condition example, rare to very rare because these guns were used hard and received little maintenance and care, that appears to have come out of the factory yesterday afternoon might fetch $100 at auction while a rusty metal, rotten or broken wood, worn out locking devices and missing parts piece of junk fit only for parts salvage or as a canoe paddle might fetch $10.00. In addition to the test Friday afternoon, I charge $3.00 for information about an old gun ($4.00 for correct information). Please put a $3.00 bill in the small slot on the side of your computer and hit the send key. Don't use a $5.00 bill as my computer is not programed to make change.
 
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