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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got my first tubed gun on the way, and I'm wondering if there are any warnings/tips/tricks that I need to know about using these tubes.

It seems pretty straightforward, but often times owners have useful insight on modifications such as these.

For what it's worth, they are match weight tubes fitted to the gun. The original owner is including all the tools and chokes needed to operate them.

Thanks!
 

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TFin04 said:
I've got my first tubed gun on the way, and I'm wondering if there are any warnings/tips/tricks that I need to know about using these tubes.

It seems pretty straightforward, but often times owners have useful insight on modifications such as these.

For what it's worth, they are match weight tubes fitted to the gun. The original owner is including all the tools and chokes needed to operate them.

Thanks!
Avoid using the 20 with reloads using Hodgdon International Powder. Reports indicate a higher incidence of cracked tubes with that combination. Since yours are used, they bear checking. Trust, but verify!
 

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1. Make sure you look closely at the installation before you remove them the first time. Notice how they interface with your ejectors, and how much space is between them and the end of your barrels. When you re-install them, you need to replicate both.

2. If they are new or nearly so, they sometimes require a substantial rap (or series of raps) to remove them the first time. The first time or two you remove them from your gun, make sure you position your barrels to where the tube will stop before it flies out the end and hits the floor. It may require you place a cushion or pillow near the tubes to stop them, since your hands will be busy holding the hammer and muzzle device. No need to dent the chamber wall after inadvertently launching a missile 4 or 5 feet.
After a few removals it gets much easier.
 

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Yeah, 20 ga are most susceptable to cracked chambers do to the thinner chamber walls. I also chose not to use International although there are published loads for 20 ga using this powder...but the pressures are higher.

I have had great luck with Hogdon's Universal for both 20 and 28 and use them in Briley tubes regularly.

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
This is good information everyone.

I'm typically a Rem Gun Club shooter. I would think with the brass bases and low pressures they should be a good candidate for these tubes.

I will be doing 95% of my shooting from the factory 12ga barrel, but I'd like to get into the sub gauges a bit, as well as teach some new shooters on them.

Thanks!
 

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Gun Clubs have steel bases. They're fine to shoot through tubes, though. There's nothing inherently bad about shooting steel-based shells through tubes--just be prepared that they may stick in the ejectors and take a little more effort to get them out. Congratulations on the purchase! You think you're going to shoot the 12 now, but I think once you try the tubes, you'll likely never go back! :D
 

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I use a set of chokes dedicated to the tubes. No trouble with plastic or lead buildup. Make sure that you have all the oil removed from the barrels before putting the tubes in, but the barrels must be clean as previously stated. Once I did not remove the oil and had trouble with the tubes being ejected instead of the hull.
 

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MRPOWER said:
Gun Clubs have steel bases. They're fine to shoot through tubes, though. There's nothing inherently bad about shooting steel-based shells through tubes--just be prepared that they may stick in the ejectors and take a little more effort to get them out.
That's right. I shoot Remington Gun Clubs in my Briley Revolution 20ga. tubes with zero problems. On the other hand the Estate Super Sport Competition Target Loads stick so much I have quit trying to use them in my tubes.
 

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Don't hammer on the extractors when inserting the tubes. Top tube and bottom tube are each machined to fit that particular barrel so note the color of the tube and make sure that you've got the correct tube for the correct barrel. As noted, some less expensive shells will tend to stick in the chambers more then a good quality brass head would, usually not too much of a problem just have to dig them out of your gun.

Oh, one other, be sure not to insert your 20 gauge tubes for the 28 ***** shoot-off! :oops:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
MRPOWER said:
Gun Clubs have steel bases. They're fine to shoot through tubes, though. There's nothing inherently bad about shooting steel-based shells through tubes--just be prepared that they may stick in the ejectors and take a little more effort to get them out. Congratulations on the purchase! You think you're going to shoot the 12 now, but I think once you try the tubes, you'll likely never go back! :D
Hmm. I thought they were nickel plated brass. Oh well. :)
 

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Lots of good advice here.

The tube set you're buying are Briley Revolutions; when you put them in the barrels, you won't be "pounding" directly onto the tube, as you do with the "originals". That's where the warning about not hitting the ejectors comes from.

Just push the tubes into the appropriate barrel, and make sure the ejectors on the tubes are over the ejectors in the 12 ga barrels; then, you pound them in. With the Revolutions, you insert a tool into the chamber of the tube, and pound on the tool to drive the tube in. The tool will likely be tight when you're finished, just gently tap it on the side, like you'd do with a nail you've driven a little into wood and you want to loosen and remove it: same concept. There are 3 sizes of tools, one for each of the sub-gauge sets. Be sure to use the correct tool! The tubes are about 1 1/2 years old, fairly new but "knock in & out" fairly easily now.

I like to do the knock in & out holding the barrels vertically, with whichever end is down over my foot. When pounding in, it protects the breach end, and when knocking out, the tubes drop onto my shoe, not on cement, into rocks or whatever else you may be standing on, and you won't launch them across the room, either.

I recommend you remove the choke tubes of whatever gauge you're shooting about every 500 rounds or so. Clean out all the plastic buildup on the inside, and clean & grease the threads. This insures your choke tubes will be the constriction they're marked, and that they won't become fixed chokes! :shock:
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
BPGuy said:
Lots of good advice here.

The tube set you're buying are Briley Revolutions; when you put them in the barrels, you won't be "pounding" directly onto the tube, as you do with the "originals". That's where the warning about not hitting the ejectors comes from.

Just push the tubes into the appropriate barrel, and make sure the ejectors on the tubes are over the ejectors in the 12 ga barrels; then, you pound them in. With the Revolutions, you insert a tool into the chamber of the tube, and pound on the tool to drive the tube in. The tool will likely be tight when you're finished, just gently tap it on the side, like you'd do with a nail you've driven a little into wood and you want to loosen and remove it: same concept. There are 3 sizes of tools, one for each of the sub-gauge sets. Be sure to use the correct tool! The tubes are about 1 1/2 years old, fairly new but "knock in & out" fairly easily now.

I like to do the knock in & out holding the barrels vertically, with whichever end is down over my foot. When pounding in, it protects the breach end, and when knocking out, the tubes drop onto my shoe, not on cement, into rocks or whatever else you may be standing on, and you won't launch them across the room, either.

I recommend you remove the choke tubes of whatever gauge you're shooting about every 500 rounds or so. Clean out all the plastic buildup on the inside, and clean & grease the threads. This insures your choke tubes will be the constriction they're marked, and that they won't become fixed chokes! :shock:
Good to see you here Dan! Thanks for the advice.
 

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Briley has a good garauntee on their tubes and it is transferable for a fee. Check the paper work with the tubes or call Briley. If you have an incidence of tube damage you will be gald you paid the transfer fee really quickly. like someone pointed out, watch the 20 ga tubes with high pressur/performance loads. Again Briley will give you good guidance. Enjoy yourself. Tjhe tubes are a good investment.
 

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With those 20 GA tubes, stick your little finger in and feel for a rough area under where the ejector cutouts are. On mine, I must have cleaned them 3 or 4 times and looked down the tube every time to make sure I had all the lead out and never noticed the crack. I could feel it though when I put some grease on my finger and lubed the tube chamber so the new 20 GA Win Super-X shells wouldn't stick.
 
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