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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Tried the search, seems my search words were too common, so I apologize if this has been previously done.
Basically, I know they can put triggers with a LH cant, but if someone was to have a LH double made, would they also reverse the front/back order of the triggers/ Can this be done to an existing RH gun?
 

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I don't understand... why do you think they should be different?

I suppose anything could be done if you wanted to spend the money... double triggers really are pretty simple... a lot simpler than an inertia trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Current DT guns are set up for RH shooters with the right trigger being the front one. Can they be reversed easily for a LH or would one have to order a gun, or do they even bother to switch the triggers on a LH gun?
 

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I'm guessing here, but it would seem that it could be done. At least in some instances. But the question is why? I understand about wanting to shoot the left barrel first and the recoil ramifications and all, but by reversing the triggers, you'd also be reversing the choking! I thnk that to accomplish what you are after (or at least what I think you are after) you need to have the gun custom built.

Or at least have choke tubes! (a sacrilige on doubles, in my opinion :wink: )

Frank
 

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Yes it can be done. The trigger plate mechanism is simple enough, it just requires getting the action "regulated" after getting the right trigger plate and the triggers turned around.

Dr. David Dabaco has one set up that way and even has then action lever changed around.

I would suspect you would be able to get the trigger plate from the maker in Spain or just have someone fabricate the plate here and use the parts you have if you want to switch a gun around.
 

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Hey all!

Sorry I haven't been posting lately --been busy running the dog, working, family, etc...

As to the question at hand: I have an Arrieta 578 that is set up this way, so it got me thinking about my right-handed Ugartechea M-30. As a result, one day I decided to take the plunge and switch the triggers just as described. I found that the position of the sears was identical from left to right and all I simply simply had to do was switch the triggers. Super easy. The hardest part, as always, was getting that damn screw out of the bottom plate without messing it up. It was very tight, but I finally got it and didn't tear it up. As I said, the actual process of switching the trigger was a piece of cake, but there are several things to consider. First is the triggers were set up with a slight bend in them for a right handed shooter. That bend keeps the triggers --especially the rear one--, tucked neatly under the trigger guard. What I did was put them in a leather padded vice and heat them with a simple propane torch and bent them the opposite direction to get them where I wanted --tucked back under the trigger guard. This was not hard to do and the trigger blanks are not super sensitive parts in the sense of case hardening. Bending the triggers to fit under the guard is very important because I found that if I didn't do this, the rear trigger would have stuck out from under the guard and possibly could have gotten hung up on clothing, brush, or something else. You definitely do not want that! The next thing to consider was once I got those triggers bent where I wanted them and the gun reassembled, I checked the trigger pulls on each trigger. The rear trigger should have broke with less weight than the front since I switch them. But in my case, I found that the front trigger and the rear trigger broke both at 7 lbs. --with the rear trigger perhaps breaking only a 1/16 of pound less than the front on some tests. That is close enough for me, but I wouldn't want the rear trigger breaking a 1/2 lb. less than the front. If that happened, the gun would have gone off to the shop. My suspicion as to why I did not see a significant difference perhaps has to do with the position and shape of the trigger as well as the actual sear adjustment. I am suspecting that the shape of the front trigger and the leverage involved helps that trigger break easier than the rear. Hence I did not need to adjust the sears or trigger pull. But that is something I would definitely check. Further more, I am not stupid or brave enough to attempt to file the sears and adjust the trigger pulls myself --I would leave that part of the job for a competent gunsmith and besides I am satisfied with what I have. So, that leaves my final consideration which is to change my chokes on this gun. My gun was originally set up M/F --firing the right barrel first as a modified choke. What I want to do is ream out my left barrel from F to IC since that is the barrel that now the barrel that fires first. This is going to save me a little money because if I would have left the gun alone, I would have had to alter two chokes to get a IC/M choked gun. Now, all I have to change is one barrel. The whole process for me took about two hours work, with plenty of interruptions and taking my time.

My question now is, should I have the choke altered by a professional smith or should I purchase the reamers and do the work myself. I am very tempted to do the latter since reaming out a choke does not seem that hard and can be done with about $150 - $200 worth of tools.

Here is where I am hoping Kyrie or Chorizo will chime in... guys, is this something I should attempt myself?
 

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Sorry I'm not Kyrie or Mitch, but...

Why wouldn't you send the barrel to Mike Orlen who will ream the bore to your specified choke for $35 as I recall. He's done hundreds, if not thousands, has the tools AND the experience. unless of course you just want to do it to say that you've done it.

I have a very good friend who retired as a journeyman ironworker, makes some of the finest custom knives you've ever seen, does some fabulous gunsmithing, and has machined some really awe inspiring stuff out of steel (like a flyfishing vise). However, he did severely F*** up his favorite Browning Superposed that he bought new in the early 60's trying to install some screw in chokes for the first time. He told me he never expected to have a problem.

Just some food for thought...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Dave - THANKS a bunch!....That was the type of info I was seeking - it SEEMED to me that just switching triggers would be possible. I suppose one could even order triggers with the LH cant and switch.

I was looking at the same scenario - finding a nice M/F, switching triggers, having the F reamed to IC and, if necessary, get the stock cast on.......gotta take less time than waiting on AyA or someone make one......
 

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David Dabaco said:
My question now is, should I have the choke altered by a professional smith or should I purchase the reamers and do the work myself. I am very tempted to do the latter since reaming out a choke does not seem that hard and can be done with about $150 - $200 worth of tools.
I've taken choke out of junk guns with reamers and brake hones... never had one go bad yet.

That said, you're not talking about some old fixed choke mossberg barrel, you're talking about an Arrieta... send it to a pro.
 

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HELL NO! Send it to a pro. I have done it myself on junkers and old shooters. but it is very, very easy to screw things up, get non-concentric reams and "chattered" cuts.

Find a pro!
 

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Stop it you guys! You're killing me. Now I've got to play with my triggers & chokes. I knew there were too many LH'ers here for my own good and I'd end up with more things to have done to my SG's. Just kidding. Great info. Too bad my 16 gauge has a perfect choke setup now and so won't be flipped. But I'll also be expanding my looking for tighter choked guns in the future. For $35 or there abouts I'd have an expert do my chokes. But I'm not setup for machining anything here at home.

PS - I'm going to post a link to this thread in the LH shooters forum here on SGW.
 

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David, thanks for your usual lucid description of the solution to a gunsmithing question I have also thought of before. However, being blessed :lol: with the ability to shoot off my left-shoulder has not stopped me from just shooting my two double trigger guns with nary a problem.

Not sure why you guys want to change things around. The cant of the right-handed triggers is not noticeable to me--I do shoot with gloves and perhaps, bare-fingered, it would be a nuisance--and I shoot the right barrel first with ease. I don't want a left-handed operating lever because I am really right-handed in everything else so that would be awkward. I once played around with a backwards Italian O/U and it was really strange to handle.

"oneounceload", why is it important to switch it over for you? If you're really a totally unredeemable lefty like David, is it uncomfortable for you to handle the righty version of a double gun? Just curious. :?:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I was asking to see if it was something that could be done easily and inexpensively.....the few times I have fired a RH DT gun, it was very easy to pull both at once.....something I am trying to avoid.....I prefer the top lever to stay RH - it's easier to push it than pull it IMO, but IF I can have the triggers switched, then of course, having the left barrel being more open makes more sense.

In would ask all of the RH shooters to try a LH gun and see how awkward it feels
 

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A couple of things here:

1. I am not talking about opening the choke on my Arrieta --that gun is perfect the way it is. What I am talking about is a 12ga. Ugartechea M-30.

2. I would never send anyone's gun to Mike Orlen. I sent him work a few years back and was not only very disappointed with his work, but he would not answer my emails or phone messages. I have heard many good things about him and he sure seems to have many satisfied customers --I guess I am not just one of them. I usually don't bring this up, but because strato-caser was so adamant about Orlen I felt compelled to speak out. Keith Kearcher resolved the issue with the gun I sent to Mr. Orlen.

3. Please see this video:

Now tell me what you think?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for posting that link....guess my question is this - doing it that way, how do you get the taper and parallel??....is this just a tapering of the current barrel?...My understanding, ( and it could easily be WAY off), is that the barrel comes to the choke, which is a step down, followed by a parallel section.........do I have that wrong?
 

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Oneonce,

You have that correct as far as I know. In general there is a taper in the barrel and then a parallel (with some special exceptions). When you open a choke as depicted, my understanding is that all you are doing is removing metal from the parallel constriction. The tapered section is not really affected. That is why it is easy to reduce choke, but very difficult to add choke. Adding choke would involve back boring the entire barrel to restore that tapered choke. Hope this makes sense.

From what I understand, the secret to performing a good choke job would be the machined bushing that keep the boring rod and the reamer aligned straight down the barrel. With out these bushings, the rod and reamer become canted and that would effect the placement of the shot when it leaves the barrel. I don't know if you have to make these bushing or if you can buy them. I have seen the reamers for sale, but not the bushings.
 

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Dr. Dave,

I am certainly not adamant about recommending Mike Orlen, nor was it my intention. After re-reading my post I can see how one could easily interpret my post as an endorsement. I have spoken with Mr. Orlen on the phone exactly once, never met him, and he has never done any work for me personally or anyone I shoot with. I merely cited him as an example of an experienced gunsmith who is well known to most of us, reasonably priced, and held in high regard by many people posting on these types of bulletin boards.

My intention was to show that opening the choke need not be expensive, nor worth the risk or expense of acquiring the proper tooling in the event one might be tempted to do it themselves.

I'm sorry to hear that you had a negative experience, and will weigh in on that in the near future as I am considering sending him an Arrieta I am currently in the process of purchasing for a stock bend. Thank you for the heads up.

So gentlemen, let's get back to the topic at hand and not be tempted into turning this into a thread about Mr. Orlen.

So one might ask whether I am left handed. Absolutely not, but two of my hunting partners are left eye dominant righties who shoot Ugartecheas with double triggers and would love to hear about the relative simplicity of changing over.
 

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Strato-caster,

No problem. I think that there are a lot of endorsements on the internet forums that run "word-of mouth," but the only problem is that many of these endorsements are exactly that: just word of mouth. Given the exponential nature of the internet, sometimes unjustified endorsements run like wildfire.

Most well-known barrel specialists charge between $75 - $150 to open a fixed choke gun per barrel (like Seminole, MGW, or Briley). Smaller shops which would be using the same reamers and technique you see pictured in the video run less. That is why I am considering buying the reamers. For a couple of hundred dollars I could buy the tools, open my own choke, and have them for future guns. Thinking about it, my uncle has a friend who was a gunsmith years ago that I bet would be willing to help me. Unfortunately, he sold all his tools including his reamers when he closed his shop 20 years ago (due to liability, insurance, and the never-ending hassles from local, county, and state gun laws). He has helped me with other gun related projects in the past. Now, he makes hand-made custom furniture without power tools --and I am being serious, lol. I guess a phone call is in order.
 
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