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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello: Working on a very poor piece. Laid around in a flooded basement and never cleaned up afterwards. I have fully dismantled now and would like to refurbish. Original family owner was my grandfather. My Dad had it for many years but never used it. I took it off his hands about 10 years ago and just stored it. I find a bit of time on my hands now I have retired and thought I would tackle this one. The wood is poor. The metal is well rusted but having soaked it for a while and getting it down to components, I find metal to metal and metal to wood is fairly tight. One slot screw has a broken head, one firing pin appears to be a really rough replacement and not really functional.

Does anyone have a line on obsolete parts for this gun before I look at having some screws and a firing pin machined?

Also, this has laminated steel barrels which look reasonable but I seek a little guidance on proper ammunition for something of this vintage.

Finally, if I am uncomfortable about firing this old gun, can anyone fill me in on using inserts or full length sleeves to change from 12 to 16 or 20 ga?

Thanks for the time taken by anyone who responds.

Regards, Jack
 

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Janseen Made some good guns, but also made a lot very cheap guns. I know of no source for parts. this could be a very expensive project. unless money is no object, I would advise cleaning it up and hanging it on the wall. As far as shooting it, most laminated barrels are very low quality, you should seek the advice of a smith who knows about this type of barrel. The tube Manufacturer should advise you abot the liners. Bushrod
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your reply. This one would most certainly have been one of Janssen's cheap cheap - maybe even cheapest - guns. Given the family history involved, I don't mind to spend a lot of my own time and a few dollars to do this restoration. The consistent advice, in a variety of shotgun forums, when it comes to guns like this is as you too have stated - clean it up and hang it. That is most likely what will happen, but I do enjoy upland hunting and if there is a safe manner to use this gun, I would like to. If there is no safe manner, I value my hands and eyes more than using an antique to put a pheasant in the bag. Once again, thanks for the time taken to reply. Regards, Jack
 

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Jcronk,
"Sleeving" the barrels is quite expensive.
If you get "into" the restoration and are going to fire this shotgun with its laminated steel barrels, stick with black powder ONLY. There are those that say, "oh I reload a very low pressure shotshells using modern components that are o-k to shoot in these shotguns".
This is asking for disaster!
Ray
 

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Shooting old guns is great fun but I would suggest that firing anything out of laminated barrels which have been water damaged is very unwise. Problem is corrosion between the layers which is very difficult to detect. You'll get just as big a bang and as much shrapnel from a black powder load as you will from smokeless if the barrel ruptures.

I would encourage you to clean it up and hang it on the wall. It will make a great family conversation piece.

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Bob: Thanks for your reply. Potential for concealed corrosion between layers of laminated steel makes a lot of sense. Will keep plugging away. So far, other than dismantling, I have fully refurbished only the internal parts for the left hammer. At this rate, it will be a few months yet. Thanks everyone for your suggestions and concerns. Happy New Year. Jack
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Fellow enthusiasts: You may recognize some Janssen parts. Whether or not I get this old beast operational or make a lovely wall hanging, I just had to buy this thermos when I saw it. A little ambience please for the coffee break. 279 sleeps to opening day. Regards, Jack

 

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Keep in mind also that some of these older guns had what were called "damascus finish Barrels. these were fluid steel barrels that had damascus patterns etched on them.
try doing osme fileing on the underside which gets covered by th eforend to see if it's damascus finish or true damasucs.

My Grandfather in Canada also owned a janssen & sons Shotgun and my brother has it today. The one we have is called "The Interchangeable" and was offered with an extra set of 16 ***** barrels but we no longer have those barrels and it's thoght that My gGranfather neve had them to begin with.

Iurs is in fairl good condition but all grey patina, no origionall bluing relamis and one hammer has been replaced by one made from flat stock.

Even with damascus barrels It's not that hard to find Black powder shells already loaded to be fired savely in old guns with damascus barrels and you can even load your own using Hodgdon's triple seven non corrosive BP substitute or the new Goex non corrosive synthetic. Do not use pyrodex synthetic thinking that it is also non-corrosive because it isn't .

But even with just plain BP, smoothbores are not that hard to clean up after firing, I just prefer the non corrosive bp substiututes because I load it in modern shotshells and don't want the brass palted steel bases to rust.

Black powder shot gun is loaded volume-for volume shot-to powder, and you can slightly rreduce the volume of the powder charge when using triple seven since it seems to be a little "Hotter than BP.

I load shells using triple seven for a 10 ***** Joseph Manton sidelever double and use cut-down Federal shells with an over-shot wad held in with silicon seal. I also use shot cups which greatly improve patterns.
 
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