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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, here we go.

I have just got into the shooting sport (sporting clays and upland) with-in the last 3 years or so. I go 3 or 4 times a year.

I'm thinking of getting into it a bit more and making a bit more of a comitment to it. I'm looking to get into trap and skeet.

I'm looking for advice here as to how to proceed with my new "itch".

When I got into this, I went out and bought an entry leval, no frills Browning Citouri o/u with nothing special about it at all. No special woodwork, no engraving, no nothing. For me, it just feels good. It comes up nice and feels natural. I'm pretty happy with it.

Now I can't help but wonder what all the hub bub is over these way higher priced guns. Is it just the quality in finish? Or am I missing out on something? Does the target really know what hit it? Does it matter to shoot an $1,100 Browning or a $10,000. Beratta?

My question is now that I have the "itch" and am thinking about the next purchase, what avenue should I be exploring?

As of now I'm thinking a combo o/u in 12 and 20 gauge. Or, I'm thinking maybe not a new gun at all and just have Brownig fitted and stay with th 12 gauge and call it a day. Maybe I should ditch the Browning all together and go for something else? How is Brownig perceved by the shooting comunity? Whats the standard benchmark for a decent, serious shooter? (Brownig and Beretta seem to be in the fore front for this sport)

I dont know! I need help! Sombody make this problem go away!
 

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If the Browning fits you well, and you shoot it well, maybe you are a "browning guy" then. A citori is a fine gun, but if it is a field model it might not be the most suited for clays. If you are really itching to upgrage, you could get a Browning XS sporting model and keep the citori for hunting. You could also sell it in a heartbeat.

Welcome to SGW!!
 

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Hey nm156 congratulations on your itch. I've had it for 50 years.
In all honesty though you kind of sound all over the place. Your doing Sporting clays and upland hunting, and now you want to try trap and skeet. There is a lot of diversity between these games and the hunting so you will need to stabilize a little before you go off and start buying the right guns (of course if you have the money and you buy good guns, no harm no foul).

Not knowing what kind of Browning you have I won't try to give you any advice except if it works for you it is probably fine until you really know what you want.
Pay attention to what others are using in the games and hunts you participate in. If you can try different guns do it, but try to find out what you really like and then go after the right gun.

There are a lot of things that make a good shotgun. Sometimes those things are different to different people, but in general your looking for a gun that fits and feels right, is accurate and is reliable and will last a lifetime. After that you can start looking at the aesthetics.
When it comes to form and function both Browning and Beretta have demonstrated themselves to be winners for a very long time.
 

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Keep using your citori until you figure out what you want from seeing/handling other poeple's guns at the range, etc. That would be my advice. Eventually you won't have to ask and what you decide on based on experience will be less likely to let you down than based on what everyone tells you on a forum. That being said, by all means browse around here to get ideas on what you might want. You will start to learn what the main benefits and problems are with variuos guns, then go out and try to handle the ones you are interested in. You can also go to Gander Mountain to check out guns. It is great because they are all out for you to try (not fire) without dealing with a salesperson.

Are you in NM? Just guessing by your username. There is a GM in Lubbock and one in Amarillo.
 

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nm156 welcome to the obsession and to SGW.
Your Browning even if it is a field model is more than adaquate of a gun to start out with in the clay shooting world. Alot of us aquired the itch with far less. Keep shooting it until you really find out which of the clay sports you are going to shoot more often than not. A sporting model will likely be a better choice if you are apt to shoot sporting and skeet and will work well for trap.
I myself shoot more trap than skeet or sporting so I have settled with a trap model which is usually heavier and shoots higher than a sporting model.

The only advice I can give you is what ever gun you decide on getting make sure the gun fits you. Beretta's just don't fit me that well but most of the brownings feel better to me when shouldered. As gar-dog said the XS would be an option as would the Browning 525 sporting.

It doesn't matter if you spend $500 or $15000 if the end result is that you are hitting targets and having fun doing it by all means spend $500 and take the rest of the money and buy ammo.
 

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You bought a good shotgun right off the bat. And I gather that it fits you and shoots well for you. Enjoy your good fortune. Many people have to upgrade because they made a poor choice in the first place. Just concentrate on developing your shoooting skills with it. If you find that one or another of the types of shooting you do doesn't work to your satisfaction with the Citori, then you can start trying to figure out whether another gun would improve things. But at the moment, if it is not broken, don't fix it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Wow!

Thanks for all the great advice people!

I guess I am all over the place. I suppose I want it all and now!

Anyway, after digesting the words of wisdom here I've come to terms with my itch and for now, I've decided to stick with the browning and have it fitted for me to make sure I'm starting out with something thats right.

I am pretty much a no frills guy and a fancy gun just wouldn't look right on me just yet. From what I gather here, as long as I can shoot / hit, I'm on the right track.

The only concern I have is does it make sense to have my gun custom fit for me? Or is the quality of entry level Browning guns just not worth it?

I bought it new and I'm not sure what model it is. It has no markings on it other then Browning Citori. It's a 28" o/u barrel with a a rubber but plate, it takes up to 3 1/2" shells, plain checkering on the grip and fore stock and a plain blue finish. I bought it for $1,000. It came in a cardboard box with 3 chokes and a choke wrench. I don't see it on their web site so maybe it's a special run of lower finished grade shotguns. The fit is super tight and it looks as if Japan manufacturing has an edge here.

Any guesses?

What the consensus, fit or no fit?

Thanks again to all who have taken the time to help me here.

I really appreciate it.
 

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nm156

It sounds like an NOS (new old stock) Browning Citori. The 3 1/2" chamber is probably not a plus for a target gun (depends on how it patterns with 2 3/4" shells), but it sounds like your doing pretty good with it.
Does it look like this one on gunbroker?
http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewIt ... m=85924577

As far as fitting I would probably wait until you have a gun that you really like. A proper gun fitting is not a cheap (relative) proposition. It can vary from as little as several hundred dollars, to over $1K depending on how far you go (sometimes you may need all new wood)
 

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A more expensive gun will not buy you more targets unless, the more expensive gun seems to fit you better. Consequently a cheaper gun could actually bring more X's, the point being its all about the fit.
Price will only make a difference in that, the gun will reliably go bang everytime you pull the trigger. Bargain guns auto or O\U will have reliability problems if the intended purpose is more than recreational target shooting,...say more than 300 rds a month. The high dollar guns 5k and up usually can handle a little more abuse, may have better trigger pulls and most of all better resale value, besides that its all cosmetic and pride of ownership.
Your Citori has proven to be very reliable and a great starter gun. There is absolutly no reason to upgrade. There will be a time once you have shot enough to know when a longer stock may help, playing with comb drop, switching to a gas gun because of recoil etc.
But you have to spend a great deal of time mastering the basics to create consistances in your mount swing and shooting style to objectively attack gun fit.
What I would recommend to you is read up on as much as possible, articles and or books about the subject or get with an instructor who knows gun fitting. Do as they say " shoot the gun ugly" for awhile which means temporarly add moleskin to the top of the stock or maybe remove wood by filing it down with a rasp, buy longer but pad screws and start adding spacers etc.etc.Find out what feels good and seems to break more targets for you. At some point once you have proven to your self its right make the changes permanant.
But most of all get the consistancy you need to make whatever stock changes you do decide on the result of good form and not a bandaid which is temporary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
musket36 said:
nm156

It sounds like an NOS (new old stock) Browning Citori.
Does it look like this one on gunbroker?
http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewIt ... m=85924577
Thats exacly it!

Whelp, I get it.

I get that I have to put some time in, and I won't be asking questions like this in the first place.

Thanx to all who have talked me off the ledge! It sounds to me that I allready have what I need. A good field gun that suits me fine.

Thanx again!
 
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