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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bet nobody out there has even heard of my problem. I am a right handed shooter with my master eye the left,but thats the easy part.My eye doctor says that when you look at something,both eyes meet at the thing you are looking at. Mine see's two objects and rather than confuse the brain,it shuts down the right eye.I see only with one eye at a time. I can see out of the right eye only if I close my left eye,so thats how I have been shooting. My last trip to the skeet range,I shot 17,which is the best I have ever shot.I am 60 and shot right handed all my life,but I think I will try and switch over to the left hand and use my master eye.I hope I can do it.I am getting a new beretta silver mallard tomorrow and will start gun mounting at the house at objects in the house(making sure the gun is mt,of course) until the awkwardness is over.Wish me luck. sj :roll:
 

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S Jones: You should have your doctor write this down for you in plain layman's terminology. You could certainly have mono vision, but not under the circumstances you are describing.

There is a logic in dealing with mono vision that you may have not considered. If you have true mono vision in your left eye, then for all practical purposes your right eye could be shut.

Once you understand this basic fact, you, also, understand that if you shut your left eye your right eye has mono vision so if you wanted to stay mounted on your right side you could patch the left eye, and just shoot with the right eye open. What difference does it make? You can only see mono.

HOWEVER, I don't think you will have any problem switching to the left side, even at 60. Put your shotgun inside a door to a room that you frequent during the day, and mount the gun from low-gun position ten times everytime you walk into the room, and after a month you will become comfortable with the gun on the left side in either the mounted or low-gun position.

I like these eye stories, and this is certainly interesting. Hope you post a follow-up as to how you do on the left side.
 

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Here's a quick test for others that are listening....
1. Extend both hands in front of you.
2. Cross your thumbs and then bring your index fingers together (this should form a triangle).
3. Look at a distance object through this triangle.
4. Slowly bring your hands towards your face while looking at the object. When your hands touch your face the triangle will be in front of your dominant eye.

Your dominant eye processes information 14 to 21 milliseconds faster than the non-dominant eye.

You can place scotch tape or one of the commercial 'dots' on your shooting glasses to effectively shut down one of your eyes.

regards,
Jay Gentry
Shotgunworld.com
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
RemingtonII You are right,but I never thought about it that way before.It doesn't really matter which eye I use.If I switch to left hand shooting,I am still using only one eye,so theres no reason to go through the trouble of learning to shoot left handed.What you you all think of using one of the tube type hi-vis sights I have seen advertised in shotgun sports? would they help me?The ad says only the eye you are using sees the sight. sj :?:
 
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Good Luck,
I too am right handed, But I'm blind in the right eye, I have good peripheral but nothing straight ahead. The advise to keep your gun close buy and grab it every chance you get is dead on. It may seem awkward at first but after a few weeks it will be the only way for you. Don't think twice about it. Good Luck

thxs ewr
 

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One thing you will find with tunnel vision is that the left eye is REALLY dominant. I would suggest you shoot about 75 rounds of skeet with a mounted gun on the left side.

I think you will be surprised, and the reasons will surprise you.

Remington
 
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I have a thing made by easy hit on my guns. It is one of those fiberoptic sights with about a 3-4 inch tube in front of the sight. This helps you only use the correct, right, eye. I had a time when my rt. eye was blurry (needed surgery) so I got one of these on the advise of Tom Knapp. I went to the world shoot and shot a 97 in the the .410 event once I got used to this thing. I now use it after surgery (slightly better than 20/20 in both eyes) becuae I got used to it and really like the idea that I always know where the front of the gun is, even though I am looking at the target, I have a better awareness of where the gun is. Works for me.

Doc
 
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