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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those of you who have been shooting awhile ( >2yrs ), do you periodically still take lessons or feel you're past that? What's your personal criteria for deciding you're 'ready' for more lessons?

I can handle targets on a lower intermediate scale but not much more. I'm thinking maybe it's time for a trained set of eyes again. But on the other hand, I have a limited amount of time to practice from one week to the next so any progress I make is, realistically and all things being equal uh, going to be slow going. I'm waffling :lol:
 

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pure: I still take a lesson from time to time, as I see it as a way to get rid of the little quirks we end up picking up along the way.
 

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I would like to take lessons regularly, but I can't afford the instructors who are advanced enough to help me!
 

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We all need lessons now and again to smooth up the rough edges and break those annoying habits we pick up.However the cost prohibits alot of shooter whose choice is shoot or shooting lessons.They would be well avised to take the lessons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Seamus O'Caiside said:
I would like to take lessons regularly, but I can't afford the instructors who are advanced enough to help me!
What do you mean by advanced Seamus? Certified in some way or is there some other criteria you think of?

As for affordibility, it's a sad state right now but that will change as more people take up coaching. They'll have to be competitive against each others prices and only those who charge exhorbitant rates that might be left are those with some long history of producing champions. But not everyone wants to be a champion. Most people just want to alter bad habits or avoid gaining them at all or just do well in local shoots etc etc...

There are degrees of coaching skills just like shooting skills. Not all great shooters make good coaches, and not all good coaches were/are champion shooters.
 

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purestoke said:
There are degrees of coaching skills just like shooting skills. Not all great shooters make good coaches, and not all good coaches were/are champion shooters.
Amen. Truer words were never spoken. I hate those ignorant comments like "Why would I take a lesson from him, he's never even been a state champion, much less a National Champion!" The fact is, in sporting clays as in any other sport, the best coaches are usually not the best performers. And conversely, the best performers often make lousy coaches.

What do you mean by advanced Seamus? Certified in some way or is there some other criteria you think of?
I'm not too impressed by certifications. I put a lot more stock in comments from students and the results achieved by former students. What I meant was, we have some local instructors that don't charge much and would be good for a beginning shooter - I went to one of them when I started shooting 13 years ago, and I've always been very glad I did, because he started me off right. However, after having shot a lot over the last 13 years, and having reached Master class, I need help from one of the half-dozen top professional coaches in the country, but that would mean travel and high fees. I just can't do that.
 

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i would really like to take a lesson at some point-----but how the heck do you find someone that will build on what you have---not try to reinvent the wheel in your form :?:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
TexasTon said:
i would really like to take a lesson at some point-----but how the heck do you find someone that will build on what you have---not try to reinvent the wheel in your form :?:
:lol: I don't know. I'm not sure there's an exact way to find the exact coach :lol:

I guess paying any coach is a little like investing. The only way to get any kind of return on the investment is to practice what they preach. Without the time to do that, I don't think it would be of any benefit ( for me I mean ). Kind of a drag, I started out pretty on fire for the sport and now I'm getting interested in other things and finding reasons not to shoot anymore.
 

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purestoke said:
Kind of a drag, I started out pretty on fire for the sport and now I'm getting interested in other things and finding reasons not to shoot anymore.
sorry to hear that, but if the fire is gone---just going thru the motions of shooting----because you always have----is no reason to continue.

i think we are looking at an upcoming year where costs across the board will increase [as if they haven't already] and clay sports may take a significant hit from it :cry:
 

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purestoke said:
For those of you who have been shooting awhile ( >2yrs ), do you periodically still take lessons or feel you're past that? What's your personal criteria for deciding you're 'ready' for more lessons?
I think that a distinction should be made between "formal" lessons and "informal" lessons. I've never had a formal lesson, i.e. I've never paid anyone to watch me shoot and tell me how to do it better. However, from the time I started shooting at clay targets, I've strived to learn from the better shooters. I've also read numerous books/articles on shooting and I've watched and studied several different videos.

More importantly, I've studied and think I have a good understanding of the various shooting methods and which method is generally best for which type targets. Naturally, during all this studying and learning, I've been practicing what I'm learning and constantly trying to get better, smoother, and more proficient. During my practice, when I miss a target, I always want to know not just where I missed it, but WHY I missed it. By being able to analyze my own shooting and by continually studying and learning about target trajectory, I've been able to improve considerably from when I started shooting.

I'm not particularly recommending my learning method to other shooters because some shooters can learn well by this method and some can't. I'm simply saying that "formal" lessons are not the only way to learn something. :D
 

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Hey, your taking lessons by just reading and asking questions in this forum! Its all a learning experience.

That will be $25.00 to all who read this post.

Bob
 

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Lets take a little reality check from sports research.The awfull truth is that even with limited time few athletes practice the thing they do poorly to make them better at those problems.How many of you keep a log on your practice and shoots? That is the way to start to utilize your time with an instructor better.

You have to commit yourself in the positive to DOMINATE the targets and presentations that vex you.Once you have commited to this and keep a log any instructor worth their salt should be able to help you.However in contrast to the posting about more intructors creating a competitive atmosphere to the benefit of the shooters;the reality is that 90% of NSCA intructors never end up teaching in any serious way.Then again right now there is not a mentoring program to encourage them either.

So start your log and keep it going.Every time you shoot work on something you need to DOMINATE.Finally talk with prospective inetructors on the phone to share with them your log observetions over time and this will help you decide where and with whom to spend your instruction dollars.By the By a good intructor at any level should describe a lesson plan for you to work on between lessons.
 

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The awfull truth is that even with limited time few athletes practice the thing they do poorly to make them better at those problems
do you really believe people don't know which are their weak/strong targets :?:

i also don't know anyone that goes out to shoot targets they know they can break-----they shoot the ones that give them problems
 

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I did not say what people "know" they should do I said that research in sports demontrates that even high level atheltes practice more time on things they do well already than on the items they really need to improve i.e. their weaknesses.If you want the references in sports science research I would be happy to send them to you.

The log if you are unaware is an absolute requirement for all olympic atheletes simply because it reveals to a coach so much about what is really going on in performance and to a really savy athelete the direction to solving weaknesses in performance.You show up at high level performance training in these programs without a log and they send you home.

Believe me I know it is not fun to record the info but the yield is high.Try it for a season and do it for all practice and event activities.
 

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TexasTon said:
i also don't know anyone that goes out to shoot targets they know they can break-----they shoot the ones that give them problems
Think about this. I don't ever remember coming in and looking at the leader board and saying to myself "Boy, if I'd have only hit 6 more of those hard targets". I have always remembered those 5 or 6 easier or medium level targets I missed that day that I could normally hit or even walk right back and crush right at that moment.
I think time also needs to be spent on the easy targets that we all take for granted sometimes so we don't get complacent on them as well as spending time on our problem targets.

Last month I was squaded with one of the sports top shooters. I'm in AA class and of course he is quite frequently in the magazines and always placing at or near the top in all the big shoots.
Well I noticed that I broke as many and maybe even 1 or 2 more of the hard targets as he did, but he didn't ever miss the medium level or targets on the easier side.
The difference between our scores that day was 7 birds. It wasn't the hard targets that seperated us, it was the easier ones that I missed.
What is the difference between us that caused me to be off on those easier targets? I think it was not having a plan and sticking to it on the easier targets. They're easy, how can I miss these, I don't need a plan here.
Have I taken lessons? Yes and I will say I would never be in AA class and earning punches right now if I hadn't spent a lot of time with my instructor.
Just for a point of information. A quite a while back my instructor picked up on the fact that I seem to take a lot of targets for granted and we had worked on it. I sometimes don't remember to put into practice the things we have worked on. The fact is that he is a much better instructor that I am a student.
When I go into a tournament and do exactly the techniques as we have worked on, then I will place high in my class. But, If I'm having one of my "senior moment" days where I seem to forget everything we worked on, the results speak for themselves.
I've heard some people say that "you get what you pay for." But on the other hand sometimes "YOU don't get what YOU pay for."
Don't always blame the instructor when sometimes the student needs to take some responsibility if you're not getting it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
re: practice logs

I initially started doing this just as a carryover from other sports I'd been in. Going around, I noticed I was in the deep minority in this practice but chalked it up to everyone else knowing what they were doing but me :lol:

One coach encouraged it, another thought it laughable, a complete waste of my time. One of the coaches was not real big into competition himself and the other was and a pretty good shot competitively.

I got completely off track of my own shooting goals and by the time I realized it, well, I guess this thread has made me realize I just don't care anymore. :lol:
 

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The easy targets become hard when you lose your focus/concentration or do not give them enough respect.Truth is there aare no easy targets, all targets deserve the same respect.The issue then is to practice maintaining focus under even the most boring situations.The analysis that was made about the score difference with the AA shooter is that he/she had learned to maintain focus better either inately or by practising that ability.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
No offense doctor, but 'how to practice' could easily be a seperate thread than asking other shooters when they determine for themselves if they're up for more lessons or not.
 
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