Shotgun Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have read lots of data on the loads for trap and as a new shooter and reloader I have been playing with various loads . Im using Clays and have loaded from 16 gr to 19 gr used 1 oz 8 and 1 1\8 8 and the same in 7 and 1\2. I shoot a Benelli so I have tried to use less grs to keep the recoil down. My question is, what is the major difference in performance between 1050 fps and 1250 or higher. I know speed LOL . But as a beginner Im shooting average of about 21 out of 25 went 20 straight the other day then blew it. How would you notice any difference in performance other than recoil/ If Im breaking birds using 1050 with 1 oz of 8 would I improve my odds going to higher fps and using 1 1\8 of shot using # 8 shot?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
James,There is nothihng wong with your 1050fps loads and obviously they are working for you. However, if you ever plan on shooting factory ammo it is loaded for 1200fps and beyond. You will be handicapped because your timing will be honed in on the 1050fps reloads and the faster factory loads will preform much differently. Lots of guys I know , me included won't even intermix hull types during shoots and practice because a good score comes from consistant technique and differant hulls (ie: win AA:| vs fed Gold Metal :eek vs Rem STS :x ) all preform differantly even though they might report the exact same statistical data.Happy shooting, Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
On the 1150 fps loads, I would consider sticking with 7.5 shot. 8's started that slow have pretty low energy at the target break point and might dust a lot of targets.As far as hitting targets, velocity does not have nearly as much affect as many think. Here are some numbers:16 yd targets are generally broken approx. 35 yds from the gun.At that point, the target is travelling approximately 50 fps.It will take the shot from the 1050 fps load approx. 0.015 seconds longer to reach 35 yds, during which time the target will travel an additional 9 inches, compared to the 1250 fps load.So, you will need 9 inches more forward allowance with the 1050 fps load. This difference would be most critical on a 90 degree crossing target, and less critical on lesser angles. Since trap targets fly at angles much less than 90 degrees, this variance is effectively less than the calculated value of 9 inches.This effect of errors in forward lead becoming more critical as angles approach 90 degrees and less critical as angles approach straight-away is evident in shooters scores. Shooters will score generally higher on straights and slight angles because the margin of error is greater than on hard angles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Look closely at the reply by TallL and you will see that the velocity difference between most loads you can legally use on clays of any sort has very little effect on the time that it takes the shot to reach the target. Consider a true right angle crosser at 35 yards-a typical sporting clays shot. Can you or anyone else consistently vary your lead by only 8 or 9 inches? I know I can't, so velocity has the least effect on lead of all the variables. I, too, load Clays powder, and I have tried about every combination there is. I finally setled on a load in the mid 17 grain range for both 1 and 1 1/8o z loads. I simply try to keep the recoil down and the speed around 1180 fps, and that works well for me. Sometime you should buy a box of 1 oz STS or the 1 oz AA that is loaded to that fps and try them all the way back to 27 yds. I guarantee that they will break targets hard. The only time that the faster shells seemed to make a big difference to me were on true straight aways-they got there noticably faster, but an X is an X is an X, no matter how impressive the break.The major difference in the effectiveness of varying charges, I suppose, is in the retained energy. Again, in trap targets where the distance to the target when it is normally broken is usually from 35 to 45 yards the amount of energy at the target can be "adjusted" by changing from 8's (or even 8 1/2's in hot weather and 16 yd targets) to 7 1/2's as the distance increases. I always had very good results with 1 oz of 8's for 16's, 1 1/8 of 8's back to 23 yds and 1 1/8-7 1/2's from 24 on back. I often felt that the 1 oz loads actually broke targets harder, and someone offered this opinion...the shot string is shorter than for 1 1/8 oz loads, and if you are dead on the target it all gets there at the same time (rather than being strung out more) and does seem to be more effective. In my case it became more a matter of comfort. The 1 oz loads didn't kick as badly and I was able to stay in the gun better. As a note of interest, I could never develop a 1 oz load of 7 1/2's with Clays that I really liked, so I always shot 1 1/8 oz when I went to the bigger shot. Edited by: Instinctive Shooter at: 3/18/03 7:54:38 am
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top