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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As a confirmed turkey and goose hunter for many years, this will be a combined subject topic on older longer range shotguns.

This specialized interest began this past spring after using a 1920s LC Smith Long Range Waterfowl double with Hevi-tungsten shot
on a tricky wild turkey who had eluded me for two years. Same gobbler.
I have been regularly alternating the LC Smith gun with an original 3-inch AH Fox HE
Super Fox. The Fox patterns better with #5 shot, while the Smith prefers # 4 shot and is a pound lighter than the SuperFox- even with 32 inch barrels against 30 in of the Fox.
The HE Super Fox also ranges 5-10 yards beyond the LC Smith in range pattern tests.

Now the interesting subject: I used Hevi-Shot Tungsten 3-in #4s in a shotgun approaching
a century in age. The SuperFox is also in the same age bracket but utilizes a 10 -gauge frame. Both guns were designed for Super-X 3inch magnum loadings of the 1920s. The same loadings used by Capt Askins and Nash Buckingham 90 years ago on ducks.

The H-Shot factory says the loadings are safe. I am convinced the loads will work safely in the SuperFox and the two Winchester Model 12 Heavy Duck guns I hunt with.
I am not sure that I will continue the practice with the LC Smith. There is also the same question with a B-grade 1916 Fox that will chamber 2 3/4 in Hevi shot loads.
Valuable collector grade shotguns deserve care, and today's premium hunting ammunition
is probably riding the line as to pressure curves.

Caveat emptor.
 

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I would probably be more concerned about barrel damage from running extremely hard Hevi-Shot through tightly choked 100 year old double guns. In fact, your guns are too valuable to risk it IMO. Ring bulges and barrel separation are very real possibilities.
 

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For long range and payload in a classic double it will be hard to beat an Ithaca Magnum 10 chambered for the 3 1/2" shell. If you want a similar but more contemporary gun that perhaps costs less, then look for a Beretta Model 410 made in the 1970s
 

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450 Fuller: I am just curious so don't misunderstand my question. Wouldn't #6 shot have enough energy and provide the added benefit of filling in patterns better than the larger shot?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Something to consider is smaller shot, along with what size shot patterns best in individual shotguns. The additional attraction of a double trigger SXS is the ability to use #4 or #5-#6
shot shells selectively chambered so as to have an instant choice dependent on range and fowl type. I regularly employ that technique.
Another important consideration is plastic shot sleeves that cushion the shot column
a good portion of the way down the barrel. These advances were not part of shot shell development in the 1920s.
While heavier shot shell charges in larger gauge doubles are necessary for some applications,
the 3 in 12 gauge shot shell in my vintage guns have answered all of my waterfowl
requirements. There is also the intrinsic satisfaction of successful turkey hunting chess moves with a rare vintage Fox, Parker or LC Smith. That is ultimately what it is all about.
 
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