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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are you guys using to lubricate the bearing surfaces of your Krieghoff or Perazzi? If not the grease that came with your Krieghoff or Perazzi, why are you using something different?

Scott
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
sera,

I have always wondered about that. Perazzi USA and Perazzi in Italy recommend grease. Yet I see a lot of people using Tri Flow oil. Oil doesn't seem like a good choice since it will get displaced faster than grease. Especially when it is warm out.

When I bought my K-80 I asked the folks at Krieghoff about this and they said don't even think of using oil. They said use Gun Glide or similar grease product.

Interesting....

Scott
 
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Tri-flow is great stuff but i only use it as a lubercant and rust preventive. For grease i still have what they gave me and i plan on getting some more grease from them during one of the grands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I am now using Tri Flow synthetic grease and love it.

It is a semi-transparent white color; almost like silicone. It is extremely sticky. In other words, it stays where you put it. It is also non-staining to clothes which I like. I have several shirts that have grease stains on the shoulder from my Browning when I used CMD.

The best news is that it appears, based on how the gun opens and closes, to offer more lubricity than any other grease I have tried. That includes Gun Glide and CMD.

Best of all, it is quite a bit cheaper than Gun Glide or CMD.

Scott
 

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I use synthetic super lube. It has worked on a K32 with a documented 750,000 rounds through it. Good enough for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
cbxchris,

I think any quality grease would give the same results with that Krieghoff Model 32. The key is to keep the gun well lubricated with grease and to keep the grease clean.

I clean the grease off my gun every time I break it down. I break it down at least once a day when I shoot it and it is always broken down when I am done shooting for the day.

This is a fairly easy task with the Krieghoff K-80 and Model 32. I cleaned my uncle's Perazzi SC3 a while back. There are nooks and crannies for grease and dirt to hide all over the place in that receiver. I might be a little less inclined to be as fastidious if I owned one of those.

Scott
 

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I'm a big fan of Krieghoff Gun Glide. Used to buy a tube or so everytime I was at the dealer. Probably have enough for 3 lifetimes, but that's OK, I think it's great.

I use it in my Perazzi now. The Perazzi came with a tube of grease that I don't think I've ever opened.

I was at Giaccomo with my gun and he was very emphatic about just using oil. I have enormous respect for him as a person and for his knowledge, but I just can't agree on that point. He even gave me some of the oil that he recommends. I could find the bottles if anyone wants the brand names.

I really like Gun Glide and people a hell of a lot smarter than me speak highly of it.

I'll use a lite oil, like SP II on my trigger group and top latch. I like putting Break Free in my barrels after cleaning.
 

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I'm not real picky about what grease to use. Had been using some freebie lithium based stuff that came in a handy syringe, then switched to some sticky blue stuff that came in a handy "tin", and now I'm using old Campagnolo (old high-end bicycle component company) lithium that comes in a larger handy tin.

Like Scott, I wipe it off at the end of a day and reapply it before each session. Since grease used in this capacity is never really stressed by heat, and contamination is almost nil with the apply/reapply routine, almost any lubricant with the viscosity to stay in one place should work just fine as long as it's used consistently and properly.
 

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come to think of it I have a old container of the campy grease sitting somewhere out in the garage. Never thought of using it, I did pay enough for it at the time though. Does that stuff go bad?
 

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I'm not sure what, if anything, the following has to do with the subject matter, but it's interesting and at least somewhat related, IMO. :)

I used to ride Harley Davidson motorcycles which had the steel sprocket chains for driving the rear wheel. These chains were exposed to all sorts of weather, dirt, road grime, dust, grease, water, and just about anything bad that you could imagine. In addition, they were under tremendous stress while turning the rear wheel. I don't know the tensile stress on the chain, but I'm sure it was quite high. All I ever did to the chain in the way of maintenance was to add a bit of Chain Lube to it whenever it started looking dry. :shock:

Now if these chains would last 15,000 to 20,000 miles under those conditions, why should we be worried about changing the grease on the pivot points of our shotguns every time we shoot a few boxes of shells through our guns? :wink: Just something to think about. 8) I'm not saying anyone is wrong to change the grease everytime they use their gun, but is it REALLY necessary? I seriously doubt it. :D
 

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I have Gun Glide, Trek synthetic bearing grease and CMD. It just depends on what's in my range bag.

Has anyone used Tetra? I've used it in my 1911s for years. It's a great slide lube. I just don't want to test it on either the Perazzi or the Kolar.
 

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Great post and a lot of wisdom, Ulysses. It's O' so easy to get "over the top" with this stuff. I haven't seen these meltdowns that we all fear. Not the first time I've thought about this, but I still love my Gun Glide.

There is just no question that my gun would have "fused" by now if I didn't. :oops:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ulysses,

Motorcycle chains and sprockets are not precision pieces. They don't have the tight fit and tolerances of a fine O/U. They are intended to be replaced as a part of regular maintenance. The receiver, monoblock, and forearm iron of an O/U are not intended to be replaced.

A piece of grit is not going to hurt a motorcycle chain or sprocket. But, a piece of grit can gall the steel of an O/U.

You can care for you shotguns anyway you see fit. But I am going to keep the grease on my $10,000 shotgun clean. I have over 5000 rounds through my K-80 and the wear surfaces look virtually new. How hard is it to clean a gun at the end of the day? The K-80 is extremely easy to clean so I will continue to do so before I put it away.

Scott
 

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winders said:
Ulysses,

Motorcycle chains and sprockets are not precision pieces. They don't have the tight fit and tolerances of a fine O/U. They are intended to be replaced as a part of regular maintenance.
I understand that. The point I was making is that motorcycle chains are made of steel too..... just like your O/U. These chains run under the worst conditions imaginable without EVER getting cleaned. A chain that goes 20,000 miles probably makes about 800 revolutions around the sprockets for EACH MILE. If my arithmetic is correct, that's about 16 MILLION revolutions before being worn out. Personally, I don't think I'm going to put anywhere close to 16 MILLION rounds through my O/U, so I'm not going to worry about cleaning it as if I were going to use it for surgery. :? Enjoy your Krieghoff. It's a fine gun. I certainly enjoy my XT Trap and, since I have no where near $10,000 invested in it, I don't worry as much about it getting dinged or scratched at the range. Nor do I worry that I'm ever going to wear it out..... even if I don't give it a complete oil change and new lube every time I shoot a few boxes of shells. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Ulysses,

O-ring motorcycle chains are designed to run in that harsh environment and are designed to be replaced as wear items. Plus, o-ring chains have a lifetime supply of lubricant behind the o-rings. Finally, if you keep your chains clean, the chains and sprockets last a lot longer.

This whole comparison is completely flawed. The levels of precision and design parameters are on opposite ends of the scale.

The cleaner you keep the grease in your O/U, the longer it will stay tight and the less galling you will see. Grease attracts grime and grit. Dirty grease is not good.

I guess I don't understand why you think it is so difficult and over-kill to clean the grease off an O/U at the end of a shooting day before the gun is put away.

Scott
 

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Ok, so what about a chain on a high end road bicycle. They're made to very close tolerances and "hinge" many thousands of time in one long ride. They are non-o-ring chains

Just saying that as long as the guns lubed with something and kept clean I think you can sleep well.

But as my sig line says, I know nothing. :roll:
 
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