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I'm hoping some one can help me out I have the following:

Itaca Model 37 12GA 2-3/4", 30" barrel TESTED FULL , this gun has been in the family for a while. It has some nice game scenes on the sides.

The serial number is 206081

First, could someone tell me how old the gun is and an approximate value?? Secondly, the stock has some chips in the stock and on the sides where the metal meets the wood, can this be repaired or should I just leave it alone???

Any help would be appreciated...






Thanks,
Smitty
 

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Looks like wood rot from oil getting in the wood. Time for a new stock. Great gun however. Of all the guns i own i only hunt with my model 37. Keep your Berrettas and bennelis and such my Ithaca is my shotgun of choice!
 

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Smitty,

That's an early 1949 gun. Almost anything (theoretically) can be fixed, it's just a matter of what it will look like finished and the time and cost involved. One approach would be to piece matching walnut into the stock at the trigger plate/receiver. Of course it will show a line where the new wood meets the old. Stain and finish can blend it fairly well. It would take someone who had experience working with wood. Old soaked in oil would need to be pulled out of the wood using Whiting Compound (from Brownells) and acetone. If it was mine, I would glass bed the stock to stabilize it from futher damage due to recoil. There isn't much wood bearing surface on the 37, as the rear of the receiver is hollow, unlike Model 12 and 870 receivers which are solid. Action parts actually work back into stock recesses, allowing the short reciever so admired on these guns. Another option would be to use AcraGel, dyed brown, to fill in the lost wood. This could be done at the same time the action was glass bedded to the stock. It would look patched, but would work. The AcraGel could be worked down flush with the wood after it cured, then a finish applied that would blend it somewhat. Probably need to refinish the stock while doing all this. That would be the least expensive approach. Collectors wouldn't like it, but it would work.

I once fixed a 37 for a friend. The stock was loose and was "wallowing around" on the receiver without any stability at all, even with the draw bolt snugged tight. I glassed bedded it, sanded it down, and spray painted the wood flat black. This guy is a hunter, not a collector, and was very pleased that he could use his gun again. I even taped off the grip area on the stock and forearm and sprayed those areas with Brownell's textured black paint to give added grip where checkering would have been. The painted stock was the best looking part of the whole thing, so you can imagine the overall condition of his gun. At least I painted the forearm to match. Gotta have a little class, even in a disaster. These are tough old guns. They can take a lot of abuse and still come out shooting.

Dirtfarmer
 

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Smitty,

I forgot to mention value. It's one of those times where you don't really want to know. Just take my word that your 37 is a keeper. It's probably worth more to you than to anyone else, even if it's not your favorite gun.

Dirtfarmer
 

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Smitty,

One more thing. I think Boyd Brothers has stocks and forearms for the 37. I looked on line but didn't see them listed. It seems like I saw at one time where they offered wood for the 37. Gunstocksinc.com has a semi-inleted stock for $55. I would guess you'd be near a hundred bucks by the time you find the wood, stock and forearm, and get the supplies to do the fitting, finishing, etc. Makes a repair look more feasible.

Dirtfarmer
 

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I would call Les Hovencamp at Diamond Gunsmithing in Ithaca, NY at 607-273-4510 and run that question past him. I would then go with whatever his recommendation is. He won't steer you wrong!
 
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