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I do, I use the Lyman 12 ga slug with Blue Dot powder and AA yellow wads. Crimp as you would crimp a shot load. Killed many deer with these shot from a Remington rifled choke tube. Fully rifled barrel tends to eats the wad up, and the accuracy from my experience was not as good with the fully rifled barrel. I cast mine from wheel weights. I shoot these out of a gas gun as the recoil from my pump gun is a bit much for me with this load.
 

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Yes, I used to do the 525 gr. Lyman slugs. Then I wised up and let someone do it and found much more time to shoot. He was set up for dealing with lead fumes (toxic) on a commercial basis with a air scrubber.The ventilation it really required this to be an outdoor task for me. Since I would have done most of my casting in the winter I let Jim of Gardner's Cache to it for me. Give him a try.
You do know that lead build up in your system is cumulative . Once you have it your system it stays there forever.

http://gardnerscache.com/index.html
 

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Actually lead does not stay in your body indefinitely. For extreme cases of lead poising there are treatments to reduce lead levels though they have negative side effects. But for the average person if you can eliminate or reduce your lead exposure your lead levels will very slowly go back down. Exercise and a good diet will help increase that rate a little bit. This is the same for mercury exposure and most heavy metals. They can, very slowly, be eliminated from the body if exposure is eliminated.

mcb
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well i was just going to get lots of lead from a friend. and was thinking about casting my own slugs and reloading. I have never melted lead in the past and was only thinking of doing it. I really don't know what to ask or think of now. Can I reuse any slug shells? and what powder and primer should I use?
 

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Yes you can use once fired slug shells, but the crimp won't look very pretty.

Lets start by finding out what gun you are shooting these slugs out of, and do you have a rifled barrel for it?

Just a word of advise here, but you might want to pick up the latest Lyman shotshell loading manual. There are a bunch of slug loads in there already. It will also come in handy if you ever want to load any shotgun shells.
 

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hello all i am new here... i have been reading alot about this lyman slug and there has been some talk on hardness i see on gardeners site he he uses #2 bullet lead and alot of you on here use wheel weights can someone tell me witch one is harder. thanks in advance btw there is a chart on lyman products .com didnt know if anybody had read that as i think #2 had a hardness of 15 and wheelweight had a hardness of 8 but wasnt shure on what that meant
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well the guns that would be useing the slugs will be a few of them. a tristar viper, a charles daly. stoeger 2000. remington 11-87, Browning silver stalker, Beretta pintail. and I think an 1100 too? one more winchester 1300. and as far as I know none are rifled. just smooth bore all the way. some are semi-auto's and a few are pumps.
 

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smilerman:
You can't possibly get all the information you need to start bullet (slug) casting on a message board or talk forum.
You NEED a good reference manual.
You should start with the Lyman Shotshell Reloading Manual and go from there.
You listed several shotguns.
I don't recommend shooting slugs from all of them.
Pick one and start there till you gain some knowledge and experience.
You have taken on a very difficult task for a beginner by trying to cast AND reload slugs all at once.
Do you have any experience reloading anything?????
I would completely avoid trying to use once fired hulls from factory slug ammo.
Start with brand new hulls from Ballistics Products.
If you are only loading slugs and not trying to do everything all at once you might find loading slugs a pretty simple affair.
You need only slugs, appropriate powder, wads, slugs, a powder scale, roll crimping tool and directions.
Get the Lyman book first.
Read the Lyman book thoroughly.
Ask specific questions here and everyone will help you.
Understand that a more open choke smoothbore gun will shoot slugs better than one with a tight choke.
You might be a whole lot better off to pick a good shotgun, buy a bunch of Winchester and or Remington slugs from Walmart for under 8 bucks a 15 pack and learn to shoot slugs first.
 

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Well, smilerman115, first off I would like to say that, jeager106, made some very good points about not trying to do everything all at once.

I started off with loading the Lee 1oz. slugs bought off of e-bay (this was like way before they went anti-) with a Lee Load All II in 2-3/4" shells. Before then I had experience reloading metallic rifle and pistol calibers but zero experience loading with shotgun loads. I juts followed the loads for the Lee slugs exactly and got decent results. After a while I figured out both my gun and I liked the Lyman slugs best (still buying assorted cast slug styles off e-bay). Then I learned some tricks, tips, and pet loads by reading and asking specific questions on forums.

If you have at least had metallic cartridge reloading experience I would recommend you start with a Lee Load All II (you can probably get someone to give you one and at you pay shipping if you put up a wanted add on a few forums) they are definently a beginners machine but so long as you weigh your powder with a reloaders scale and don't use the machines powder drop they will load you some very nice 2-3/4" Lyman slug loads using slugs bought from GardnersCache.com with like no adjustments or anything for a beginner to fiddle around with so much less possibility for goof ups by a beginner. Then if you like the results you can get yourself a mold and casting equipment and make the slugs yourself --- next comes a little better reloading machine and so on and so forth until next you know your having to sneek slug reloading stuff into the house because the wife is getting tired of playing second fiddle to shotgun slugs !!! :D :D :D
 

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ihuntbuck said:
hello all i am new here... i have been reading alot about this lyman slug and there has been some talk on hardness i see on gardeners site he he uses #2 bullet lead and alot of you on here use wheel weights can someone tell me witch one is harder. thanks in advance btw there is a chart on lyman products .com didnt know if anybody had read that as i think #2 had a hardness of 15 and wheelweight had a hardness of 8 but wasnt shure on what that meant
Well in the hardness of the slug, 15 is much harder than 8, but getting to hard can be an issue as well. The sabot slug should swell the skirt, when being fired, just enough to grab the rifling. If the slug is to hard, it won't swell the skirt enough to grab the rifling in your barrel. The hardest I have played with, was pure wheel weight, and that seems to work fine. I would say try some of both, 15 and 8, to see what your gun likes best :D

There are many common factors here, with all of us that load our own slugs. If you put all our ideas together .... You will have a great reference point.

jeager is right, if you don't have a good recipe book, get one. Lyman has many great loads in their book, so pick one up.
 
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