Shotgun Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a single barrel 12 ga shotgun that I believe was manufactured between 1891 and 1939. The barrel length is 26 inches.

The markings I have been able to identify are crowns over the letters U (which I believe stands for "proof approved"); S and W. The words "Nitro" with an eagle stamp beside it appear on the barrel.

Someone told me that the gun has a Mauser K(?) 95 action.

I have used 2 3/4" and 3" shells in the gun.

Does anyone know who manufactured this shotgun and whether a model number can be determined from the information I have given?

:?

Thanks,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,211 Posts
Ziggy, I'm taking it that it is a bolt action?

(from the archives) "I would STRONGLY advise against doing anything with that shotgun other than just hanging it on the wall. As I understand it, these were made in the years after WWI from surplus Mausers, in an attempt to "jump-start" the German firearms industry under the Versailles military arms restrictions. They hogged away the whole front locking lug system, riveted a (loose) new bolt face in place, and relied on the safety lug for locking. Even though "Nitro" marked, they probably have the older short chambers and are NOT for use with contemporary cases or loads.. "

has a gunsmith ever looked at it for safety or chamber length?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
MarlandS,

Yes, it is a bolt action shotgun.

It has not been looked at by a gunsmith. I will have one inspect it for safety.

Also, on both sides of the butt stock it has a place where something may have been inlaid at some point. These areas have been filled in with a wood "plug".

I have also in the last couple of hours found web-based information on a shotgun that is referred to as a Mauser, Geha, 12 ga or Geha 12 ga. It sure sounds and looks like my gun is one of those.

Does the information I have provide point to it being that type / model of shotgun?

Thanks,
Ziggy

MarlandS said:
Ziggy, I'm taking it that it is a bolt action?

(from the archives) "I would STRONGLY advise against doing anything with that shotgun other than just hanging it on the wall. As I understand it, these were made in the years after WWI from surplus Mausers, in an attempt to "jump-start" the German firearms industry under the Versailles military arms restrictions. They hogged away the whole front locking lug system, riveted a (loose) new bolt face in place, and relied on the safety lug for locking. Even though "Nitro" marked, they probably have the older short chambers and are NOT for use with contemporary cases or loads.. "

has a gunsmith ever looked at it for safety or chamber length?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,211 Posts
Yes Ziggy , that is what I believe you have, everything I have ever seen on these point to it being quite unsafe to fire...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I have a shotgun exactly like ziggy is describing. Except mine has wooden hearts where the inlays were and also has an impression of a smiling heart with the words " HARD HIT HEART". Any info on why it is marked this way? Are they worth anything?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Actually, the GEHA shotgun should be quite safe to shoot. It is a shotgun, not a rifle. Most of the propaganda about it being unsafe comes from Mauser collector-types who are unaware of the pressure differences between shotguns and the original 8mm rifle round, and thus panic when they compare it to the original Gew98 action. The locking system in the GEHA should be quite sufficient for milder loads providing it has the proper chamber for your shell.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Ziggy, It sounds as though you have your hands on a Geha 12 ga. manufactured from the old mausers from WWI. All of the markings that you have described are those of the Geha. The twon inlays on either side of the stock used to have sheet medal medallions with the word Geha on them. It should be a safe gun to shoot. I have a 12 ga. and shoot it pretty regularly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
I just finished a history of these guns over at ParallaxBill's military surplus boards. Check out the C&R Shotguns forum after registering (it's free). Or, you could go to the survey thread over at Gun Opinions I have up which has a bit of a flame war going on it. Everything I've seen about these guns I've seen points to them being safe to shoot with light loads and a regular inspection of the third locking lug (the "safety" lug) to see if it's cracked or not. If it's cracked, don't fire it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,501 Posts
If you search the threads here, you can find my description of a young man that I saw dying from shooting just such a gun. I don't care to go into it again but I would strongly advise you not to shoot that gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
I posted a history I compiled of the GEHA and its variants over at the survey thread. I made sure not to mention any safety issues so as not to get anyone angry. However, I do believe you'll find it quite comprehensive (at least compared to the information currently available on the guns) and enjoyable from an historical standpoint. A5guy, I know you have one of these guns and are interested in its history, and would encourage you and all other owners of the GEHA, Remo, or Hard Hit Heart (along with other people simply curious) to read it. :) I would also encourage anyone and everyone who owns a GEHA or variant to participate in the technical part of the survey (you could participate in the safety part of the survey if you wanted to, though I'd rather have that in a PM) and either post the survey answers on the board or simply PM me the answers.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top