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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was looking at a used 1100 in a gun shop the other day and noticed that someone had installed a metal O-ring in place of the regular rubber barrel seal. Does anyone have any experience with metal barrel seals? Do they seal the gasses better, or are they just more resilient than rubber?

(and yes, I know the difference between the barrel seal, the piston rings, and a barrel seal activator :wink: )
 

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Are you positive that the ring was metal and not just shiney carbon deposited on the elastomer ring?

The O-ring on a Remington auto is not a moving part. It simply seals the end of the gas ring on the barrel. For most guns, it will last the life of the shotgun with only brushing with a toothbrush and a solvent like Hoppes #9 when you clean the gun. Take the ring off the mag tube, cup it in the palm of your hand, and scrub with the toothbrush. Reinstall and you are in business.

If you don't care to take the time to clean the ring, you can replace it with another Viton ring for very little money, even using Remington parts. I can't see why anyone would attempt to use a metal ring. It could not possibly seal the gas ring well.

Clemson
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm positive it was an aftermarket steel O-ring. I'm very familiar with 1100's (been shooting them since the 70's) and how the o-ring works. I've yet to need to replace one (including one that is nearly 30 years old). I usually clean mine with a patch soaked with solvent, then wipe the solvent off and lightly oil with Rem-oil. They stay nice and pliable that way.

The metal ring I saw appeared to be made for the job. It was roughly triangular in cross-section, and fit in the groove on the mag cylinder perfectly. It looked like it would mate nicely with the end of the gas collar. The gun it was on looked like it had been used for competitive skeet (26" skeet choke barrel, nice wood, and completely worn out!).

I was just curious if anyone knew anything about them.
 

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If it was metal, how did they get it to slide back into the groove where the rubber one sits?
 

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EyeMissum said:
If it was metal, how did they get it to slide back into the groove where the rubber one sits?
Good question! I can only guess that it was a split ring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ulysses said:
EyeMissum said:
If it was metal, how did they get it to slide back into the groove where the rubber one sits?
Good question! I can only guess that it was a split ring.
That's correct. It was split just like the piston rings.
 

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One of the 1100's that I bought used came with one of those metal rings. I after I bought the gun and cleaned it I took it out for a try. And I made sure that the splits in the metal rings were offset so the gas did not pass right by.
The gun would NOT cycle my light skeet loads or my heavier trap loads. I changed the metal ring to a regular rubber o-ring and it cycled fine. So, in my experience the metal rings did not work well at all.
Boatguy
 

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Bug Doc said:
I was looking at a used 1100 in a gun shop the other day and noticed that someone had installed a metal O-ring in place of the regular rubber barrel seal. Does anyone have any experience with metal barrel seals? Do they seal the gasses better, or are they just more resilient than rubber?

(and yes, I know the difference between the barrel seal, the piston rings, and a barrel seal activator :wink: )
Very early production 1100s did use a metal o-ring (right from the factory) instead of the later rubber/Viton o-rings. Remington made the change to the current style o-rings in the mid 60's. I would use the current style Viton o-rings.
 

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Thanks for the historical info. Apparently Viton is a relative of Teflon, produced by DuPont (who owned Remington at one point.) There is a recent change to the 2-piece piston and seal assembly also. The new parts snap together and look like they are nickel plated.
-Lazarus
 

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I have two current production target grade 1100s. They both use a 1 piece piston/piston ring assembly. Older guns use a separate piston and piston ring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
WinM12,
Thanks for the info. Interestingly enough, my father had a '63 vintage 1100. I remember it had a rubber (or mayber Viton) O-ring. I guess he must have replaced the O-ring at some point.
 
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