Shotgun Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,585 Posts
I have used it --shake and bake method-take a very small amount-and toss it a bag of wads-by small I mean SMALL-overkill will defeat the purpose-shake the heck out if it.I used it mainly for high pressure/velocity loads when I was shooting trap.It will work for the purpose but I would not mess with it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
456 Posts
Dear Guys,

I am the one who uses it religiously for three reasons; the increase in velocity as proven by tests with a induction chrongraph, the reduction in the standard deviation of the velocity and to reduce friction during reloading on both the feeding and seating. There is also some ancedotal evidence regarding plastic deposition on chokes but I can't prove this. I am also experimenting with it as a substitue and enhancer to shot.

The velocity increases are from 30 fps to 80 fps depending on the wad lubricity to start with.

I bought a 5 gallon pail from Midway years ago for use in loading differnt bullets in automated machinery for metallic cartridge cases. Its still about 1/2 full.

For Wads, I take a tall kitchen plastic bag and empty 1000 wads at a time into them. I use a 4" paint brush that stays in the Mica. The brush is dipped lightly into the mica and shaken into wad bag. The bag is fluffed and shaken vigorously to distribute the approximately 1/4 teaspoon or so of mica. Give it a minute to settle and pour into whatever wad storage feeder you use. If you got it right they willhave a little sheen and you will be able to see a bit on your finger pads as you handle them. Do not lick, rub your eyes, or pick your nose during reloading to avoid contaminations with this or any lead residue on the hulls.

At any point in time I have about 10 bags in use. the unused wads are stored in them. The bags are reused.

No mess and no fuss. Only takes a minute.

I heat most wads before the process in an old clothes dryer to improve the petal shape but this step is uneeded for Mica use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,159 Posts
Hmmmm... Interesting, Dave, but I don't think I'd want to get involved in any process where I couldn't pick my nose before, during and after.

Nose-picking is an integral part of my life as I decline into advanced years and continue to smoke.

Guess I'll just have to live with ragged velocity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
456 Posts
Dear Case,

A man after my own heart. :p I still smoke too, but the mica tastes funny.

Be careful with powdered teflon as it prodices a nasty tumor with nicotine as a catalyst.

Dear Pijon,

It works just as well at lower velocities. The gains are not linear but seem to be more sensitive to the wad origin. The consitency was the more important benefit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
456 Posts
Dear Case,

Gloves?? I don't need no stinkin' gloves. The wads feed automatically from a hopper.

The coating is not hazardous per se. If you were to breath it when aerosoled for a long time it will cause silicosis big time. Then again so will baby powder.

The miners of this stuff at the turn of the century were guaranteed a short life. The industrial safety guys bring this up with the coal dust all of the time. Same as those who works in the textile plants, steel mills, foundries, and just about everything else we do to make a living.

The nose pickin' always gets attention and stays in memory. I got the tip from the great Clays instructor from Houston, Gil Ash. While teaching he demonstrates the use of the finger in shotgunning. With either hand and at the top of his lungs he says " you can pick your nose in the dark can't you?" He then proceeds to close his eyes and do the deed with either hand. He says "First thing a baby learns to do before talking. Pointing well just comes naturally. Your finger knows what to do."

I've used this with the kids during instruction and its the thing they remember most. If I wish to get people to remember something important I just add a "nose pickin" comment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,159 Posts
scout26 said:
Are the latex gloves for nose-picking or the Mica ??
If for nose picking, can you provide us with yield data both with and w/o gloves ???
I'll have to admit the glove idea was a wimpy, spur-of-the-moment thought, which I should have dismissed immediately.

So that pretty much makes the nose production data a moot matter.

Hell, I don't even wear gloves when I'm chainsawing and hauling firewood.

Now... Parusky, I don't have a hopper on any of my shotshell presses, but I do pick my nose a good deal -- and often.

In fact, I've been a nose-picker all my life since I was a small snotnosed kid and I think I can confortably say I come from a family of nose-pickers.

Nose-picking was big with us.

And I was greatly encouraged when I got old enough to realize just exactly how much it grossed people out.

So I agree with you wholeheartedly on the mnemonic benefits of mentioning nose-picking when one is trying to get a point across and wants it to stick in the mind of the listener.

And supplemented by the display of a handsome bugger perched on the end of the pinky finger, your salient points will glom to the mind of the listener like...well...dried snot on the bottom of a chair seat.

But I fear we digress from the heart of the topic...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
387 Posts
I got tired of breathing the stuff in, no matter how much velocity is gained. Plus, or should I say minus, it gets on your hands and fingers. Does it increase nose picking velocity to dangerous levels? I'll have to check for any warnings on the can

Parusky said:
Gloves?? I don't need no stinkin' gloves
There's definitely a movie career in your future, Parusky. :wink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,296 Posts
Just a word of caution here. One of my shooting buddies used mica to treat his wads before loading them. The stuff built up in the barrel of his BT-99+ and we had HELL getting it out. It is so slick that 0000 steel wool wont touch it nor will a brake cylinder hone.

I might add--this guy shoots about 1000 shells a week through that gun and it took a year or more for the mica to build up that badly.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
456 Posts
Dear Driller,

I know from your frequent posts that you are a trustworthy and knowledgable shooter. However in this case I must respectfully disagree with your findings regarding the mica use on wads.

I find that hard to believe with Muscovite Mica that is the base of the powder that it causes any buildup. That's just about impossible with Mica as it does not vaporize or transform in any way shape or form at gun temperatures or pressures. It is mostly silcates in a crystal form that provides the lubricity.

I used it for years with a bullet knurler made by Corbin as a lubricant with a reduction in friction and preventer of lead buildup. if anything the build up was plastic in nature. It can be a ***** to get out. It has been used as a rocket motor nozzle with minimal erosion. Dupont adds it to Nomex.

Its physical properties are also heavily used in motor insulation in the commutator construction. I had a very large DC motor blow up due to a riser failure. The failed riser got into the air gap and arced vaporising a large hunk of the commutator. The only thing sticking around with no arc damage was the insulating mica sheets.

0000 steel wool is too fine to remove plastic or any other build up on its own. It will remove th soft surface rust which is FE2O3 from the exterior of a blued firearm without touching the delicate and thin bluing. How can it remove a buildup of anything even a little bit harder or thicker in a very hard barrel? I suggest that a wad of 3M green would have worked a lot better.

I have a Perazzi that is rarely cleaned and have shot nothing but mica treated wads for 6 years without any noticable buildup with what most people would consider very lax cleaning practices. (Once every couple of months) Two swipes and the barrel is spotless. The vented Rhinos however require a solvent soak and the interiors a bronze scrub. Without the Mica I had to do this a lot more frequently to prevent a pattern change. The build uo was measurable in the choke ID after about a 1000 rounds without Mica and minimal with the Mica.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,296 Posts
Parusky--I respectfully have to disagree with your findings about mica buildup in my friends BT99 barrel. We tried everything un der the sun to get the stuff out--including the 3M green pads.At first I thought it was plastic, but a 3 day soaking in acetone didnt touch it we figured it might be lead for some reason----nope! It was mica.

The solution to getting it out was pretty simple. The guy quit putting mica on his wads and about a month later the barrel was as clean as a hounds tooth---he SHOT it out. The only changes in his loads was elimination of the mica.----Go figure.......Driller
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,296 Posts
Nothing else went down that shotgun barrel that proper cleaning wouldnt take out fairly easily. And when he quit using the mica--the smears stopped at the same time.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top