Shotgun Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
209 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently purchased a Mod. 12 in 20ga. I read online that the 20ga all had 25" barrels mine is 26" CYL bore, made in 1942. It has a vent rib which I believe was added the rib is in two pieces one part on the barrel the second on the receiver. The lop is 13" and shows no signs of being cut. Does anyone know is the 25" length is true. The rib has square posts approx. .240 with no markings on either side. thanks Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,989 Posts
Walt is spot on. WW stopped offering the 25" in the early 20's, don't have my books handy.

They then offered them at different times with 26", 28" and 30" barrels. I have only seen less than 25 - 20 gauge Mdl 12's with 30" barrels, mostly all plain barreled guns since the early 1990's. Of the 30" barreled 20 gauge Mdl 12's I have seen, less than 10 of them were wearing solid ribbed barrels and all were choked and marked FULL with the exception of one. It's a 30" barreled 20 gauge Mdl 12 solid ribbed barrel choked and marked MOD, SN 788XXX (1939) which I own.

What is the SN of your gun? I own an early 20 gauge Mdl 12 with a 25" CYL marked and choked with a solid rib Nickle Steel barrel SN 32XXX (1914). I also own a 12 gauge Mdl 12 with a 26" CYL marked and choked solid rib WW Proof Steel barrel SN 678XXX (1935).

The WW Special Ventilated Rib (Donut Post Base) was the first VR barreled 20 gauge Mdl 12 WW offered which wasn't until sometime in the mid to late 1950's (no earlier than SN 1500XXX) if my memory serves me correctly. If a 20 gauge Mdl 12 is wearing a VR barrel with an SN prior to SN 1500XXX it was not done by WW.

Hope this helps!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,583 Posts
The 25-inch 20-gauge barrels seem to all be NICKEL STEEL, and disappeared with the transition through STAINLESS STEEL to Winchester PROOF STEEL, and the lengthening of the 16- and 20-gauge chambers to 2 3/4 inch, all in the 1926 to 28 time frame. The 30-inch 16- and 20-gauge barrels became available in 1930.

The 2 3/4 inch chambering and the offering of 30-inch smallbore barrels seems to have been a reaction to Capt. E.C. Crossman's extolling the virtues of the Remington Model 17 with its 2 3/4 inch chamber and options of 26-, 28-, 30- and 32-inch barrels in his 1923 book.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top