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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Shotgunners,
From my username you can tell that, at heart, I'm a handgun man. I'm an NRA rifle/pistol instructor, but now I want to try my hand at breaking some clay birds. Other than some informal trap shooting some 15 or 20 years ago, I have not done much shotgunning. Not knowing how deeply I will want to get into it, I decided to get one of the less expensive guns to start with. After browsing the web and checking out this and other forums, I decided to get one of the Verona LX-502 shotguns from Dick's -- which I did last Friday. :D It seems very nice and I'm anxious to try it for the first time this coming Saturday. I do have one concern; the new gun is VERY hard to open and cock. :cry: Everything seems to work alright and the ejectors snap right out once you push hard enough. It is also hard to close although it seems to lock up ok. I have sprayed the works well with solvent to clean the shipping grease out and re-oiled, but it still seems much harder to open than any other shotgun I have ever broken open. Will this shoot-in after some rounds? If so, will it be twenty rounds or hundreds of rounds? Should I be concerned enough to not shoot it and let a smith -- or the factory -- check it out first? I welcome any comments, thanks.
Bill R.
 

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Always willing to help out a wheelgunner... For break-in, use Hoppe's or Outer's gun grease (not oil) on all the pivoting/sliding points of contact. Another possibility is anti-seize compond - Molybdenum disulfide - I've never tried it, but I've heard of it being used, and it certainly won't hurt or prematurely wear anything.

Until it starts to loosen up, clean and re-lube frequently. What you want to avoid is getting a piece of hard, abrasive material in there and plowing a furrow with it. Also, metal-to-metal galling can occur where two parts of similar hardness meet.

I've heard of people mixing jeweler's rouge with grease and working the gun a few times, then cleaning it all out. I'd never do that, personally... maybe somebody out there can offer some relevant experience.
 
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Gents the Verona's are bulit to plus tolerances. They are in fact still at first, but will break in quit nice. Grease accordingly and shoot it a bit. You will find that it will come around before you know it. Briley Spectrum chokes are available for the 12 and 20 ***** as well if you really want to make wife unhappy.
Regards

Cress
 

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Welcome! The clay shooters know much more than me. But when at a loss, read the manufacturer's instructions. I know, it's not a good "guy" concept. But sometimes we all have to do so:) All new shotguns need shooting in--it's usually no big deal. See what loads they recommend for shoot-in, too. (If they do). You metioned solvent--if it's WD40 I'd stay away from it--it contains water and will rust some surfaces. The damn stuff is insidious. But maybe you know that already.

I wish I could shoot handguns; I'm a total boob at it, despite professional lessons, although I can drill a target at ten yards with a.38 in light loads or a .32 H&R magnum, but only as long as no one's shooting back. I'd never try using one for defense--no fault of revolvers, of course. It's me! My whole family would get rubbed out!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the tips. Good ole' WD-40 is one of the best things to come along in years --- for working on lawnmowers and the like. It never comes anywhere near any of my guns. I cleaned my Verona with a good gun solvent in a small hand-spray bottle, (Outer's if it makes any difference) and then put some gun oil into the works. From reading your tips above, I take it that now I need to do it again to get all my nice fresh oil back out and replace it with a light gun grease. I have some of both Outer's and Hoppe's grease, but how do you get it down under all those moving parts? I was a bit surprised to find that an O/U is far more complex than any revolver and even most semi-auto handguns.
Still haven't shot the new piece yet. That will happen on Saturday at my buddy's trap range. Another friend from work has also invited me to his skeet range next Tuesday. Never shot a skeet, do they taste good? OK... OK... another novice with the same stupid old joke... I just couldn't resist. I'll report back next week on how everything goes on both trips. Really looking forward to making a loud noise near some clay birds. I may even break some.
Jeff, I wouldn't worry about handgun shooting as long as you have your scattergun nearby. A handgun is great if you need to carry; but around the house, my Winchester 1300 Defender and my Stoeger Coach gun are both filled with buckshot. The small hand pieces are for backup.
Bill
 

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Ah, I see you know more about shotguns (and life) than you let on at first. You are clearly a wise man. I'll tell you this: when those damn clay pigeons are really coming at me, sometimes I just knife them. Yep, still have my trusty Ka-Bar. . . and I resolve to sell my life dearly . . . :lol:

Seriously, welcome. Lots of great people here!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Here's the update on the new Verona:
Saturday, it very reliably pushed one and an eighth ounces of number 8 shot downrange every time I asked it to; which was 125 times. They even occasionally intersected the flight of a clay bird. Was shooting informal trap with my buddy's thrower, although we were shooting at a regulation range. About half were standing near the trap; and half at the correct ranges. I powdered a few (beginner's luck I'm sure), chipped a few, and watched quite a few sail out over the far horizon. The range I was shooting didn't seem to matter that much. Got about the same number of hits vs. misses from either distance. Gun worked like a charm. Tried a few doubles to make sure the inertial trigger worked; no problem. It's still stiff to open, but has worked in pretty well and was getting better with each shot. Two times, I loaded, mounted, yelled "pull", and the hammer fell with only a loud click. Scared me until I realized that I was not opening the breach far enough (was only loading top barrel) to re-cock the trigger. I was simply firing the lower barrel which was still cocked from the previous shot. Once I got past that, had no other problems. I realize that this is not really a trap gun, and may be better suited for Skeet or, of course, out in the field, which is what it is really set up for. It will do me for now, and if I really get into shotgunning, I'm sure I will get something more suitable. Plenty of guidance here in the forum.
If someone out there is thinking about a very nice, if somewhat less expensive O/U to get started with, I highly recommend the Verona. I'm happy with mine.
Bill
 

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Bill,

I use both oil and grease on my O/U's. Just keep it clean and lubed well and it will break in nicely. Some O/U's take a couple thousand rounds before they break open easily. It's a slow process. Don't be impatient. :lol:
 
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revolverdude- Just a couple of things, I am a certified NRA instructor too. Follow your own lead, and get some instruction, before you develop too many bad habits. Forget almost everything you know about shooting rifle, and pistol to shoot a shotgun. Trigger timing is completly different- you must deliberatly pull the trigger at one instant. Make sure of which eye is your dominant eye. Also set yourself up at the point you will break the bird, and when you mount the gun lock your head and shoulders into the gun, and do all your swinging with your waist, hips, knees, and ankles. You must swing to hit with a shotgun.
 
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