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Been shoting a Browning Gold this season; am new to skeet and trap but love it. Shot 200 rounds of skeet and trap today shooting AAs in my friend's Browning Citori XS Sporting. I kept my cheek on the stock to line up the beads with the front resting on the rear. The buttstock sits high on my shoulder pocket, with some of it not touching. I am 6'2" 205lbs and experienced high power shooter. I was learning stance and was keeping my head down and trying both eyes open. At the end of the session I was very recoil conscious and now have massive bruising and swelling on my right cheek. Never got this from my auto (maybe just a slight tenderness after 200 rds).
Whats up? I can't continue with O/U beating me to death. But I want to buy a nice couple of O/Us and a trap gun since I am now addicted. Does the sporting comb make a difference versus the parallel type? Do I need a adj buttplate to put more impact into my shoulder and take the brunt off the cheek? What about an adjustable comb?

Please help and educate me? I want to make this a lifetime sport and want to shoot break actions instead of autos. ANY advice would be so very much appreciated. i am thinking of buying a 525 Sporting or an XS Skeet or XS sporting. PLEASE!!!HELP!!!
 

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i'm definitely no expert, but why do you want to switch to an O/U so much. From what I've seen the whole O/U vs. auto thing is pure preference, and it seems like you like your auto
 

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There are many reasons to want to shoot an O/U the first of which is reliability. With many autos to shoot in competition you may need to be cleaning the gun between 100's. In a standard trap competition you may shoot 500 or more rounds in a weekend depending on if you shoot singles, handicap, doubles, and then make it to a shootoff. Not to say that autos cant be used, two top shooters George Snellenberger and his daughter Jacque used Rem 1100, but she swapped to a Beretta DT-10 which is an O/U.

One things to take some of the sting out is to use 1oz loads. if you are using 3dram 1-1/8th oz loads. The issue in question is cheek slap and that is something that really needs to be eyeballed to see how you are placing your head on the stock and the relative position of your actual form. It could be something as simple as turning your body and altering your hold on the gun, relaxing and not forcing your cheek against the stock so much, or something as dramatic as needing the comb and butt pad adj. A good gunsmith, coach, or stock fitter can help you alleviate the problem.
 

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I just bought a new O/U to replace a Remington 870 with 4 different barrels that I was using. I have shot that 870 for years, and have become very proficient with it. I could shoot doubles with it almost as fast as someone could with a 1100, so speed wasn't a problem.

The main reason I wanted to go to a O/U was because I reload and I don't want my shells ejecting onto the ground. And, that has especially become true since I've started shooting sporting clays, with many of my spent shells flipping into the water.

And, it's really going to take some time getting used to it though. It's fits me good, but really feels different than my old 870.
 

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Sorry to hear you are battered and bruised. Whether it is a semi-auto, pump, side by side or over and under, you must get the gun fitted to avoid this sort of bruising. Have a gun fitter or coach look at how you mount the gun, after they check eye dominance, you may find shooting this gun is like trying to ride a bike two sizes to big for you. :cry:

Roger
 

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High pressure loads needed to work the auto mechanisms are not needed for the o/u.
so apart from having the gun fitted you may want totry lower pressure loads (eg B&P are very 'soft' with no loss of performance). Look for CIP marks instead of SAAMI marks on the shells you buy.
 

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I can tell you that gun fit is the issue here, not recoil. I "loose
gun fit will cause even the lightest recoil to feel like a hammer against body parts.

Going to a lower recoil round is basically hitting yourself with a smaller hammer.

The fact that you're mounting with the butt high and your cheek down low tells me you shot with a low-comb and short LOP. Both of these cause sore cheek/face.

A real nice mount will not require to you duck your cheek down to see the beads. Also, the high-butt mount says low-comb as well.

If you like the way the O/U feels, than that can be a reason to switch.

I enjoy my O/U because its shorter than a semi will ever be, its weight soaks up tons of recoil, there are no moving parts to distract you while shooting (or that you have to clean), and I think it just looks like what a shotgun should. Note that you CAN shoot 1 oz or even 7/8 oz loads in a semi; I did it for a year myself - but, you have to be ready to get some work done (or do it yourself) to make cycling easier.

Even after all this, if the gun doesn't mount right, you'll still be black and blue.

Really look into your mount, and see if that gun isn't the right fit/size for you.

Good luck!
 
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My first shotgun was a Browning 425 and it did the same thing to me. . . beat the heck out of my cheek. I bought a Beretta 391 after that and the problem went away. But I preferred the O/U and then bought a Beretta 686 Onyx Sporting and I've shot 200 rounds of factory ammo in a day and it doesn't hurt me a bit.

I tried my friends Browning Lightning the other day and after one box of shells I could feel it in my cheek. He had a Beretta and got rid of it because it hurt his cheek.

So it really is a matter of fit. The Berettas fit me better out of the box.

-Ron
 

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It really is not the gun's fault, I hear and see people saying that the "B*****" hurt me and similar things. If the gun does not fit and you therefore mount it incorrectly it will mess you up - it may hurt you and it will certainly not shoot where you are looking.

I am a recent (12 year) resident here and I am amazed that people expect a gun off the shelf to fit and they go about adapting themselves to the gun. In the UK you EXPECT and plan to spend about 10% of the gun's price on having it fitted before you take out of the store. Part of the CPSA coaching qualification process involves checking gun fit and mount

Almost all of the people who already shoot who come to me for lessons have a mal-fitting gun and mount.

Please folks, get a gun that 'near enough' fits you before starting out, you can fine tune it later.

Roger
 

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First off might there have been a spacer in between the stock and recoil pad, positive pitch if i remember correctly makes a gun shoot lower but increases felt recoil.

Second yes an adjustable comb will make that problem go away. As long as it is a 4-way adj. comb. Because then you can move the front (near the receiver) part away from your face and down some, so when the gun goes off the recoil goes down and away from your face. I also went from a gold to a combo gun. I had a bruise the first couple of weeks until we got the comb set right so it would slide past my face not bang into it.

Thats just my $.02
 

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Adjustable stock parts are great for those that do not want to spend thier hard earned dollars for a professional stock fit. however, too many shooters develop a poor posture and gun mount well before the purchase of adjustable combs, or get thier guns fitted.

A proper gun mount and posture is a prerequisite to gun fitting, otherwise you are fitting your gun to a poor posture. That will surely make some bad things about your shooting permanent.

Posture, gun mount, then fit....

And that's all I have to say about that....
 

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Another thing is having your stock fitted. Greg Hissem out of Kansas does a great job cutting stocks for combs, recoil reduction units and everything. He also fits stocks (to people), he did mine. Most knowledgible gunsmiths can fit stocks cant they?
 

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Most can make the adjustments the owner wants. Few can critique a shooters posture and mount and require that to be correct before fitting the gun.

Good gun fitters will start from the beginning, not the middle.

Dang....and I said that was all I had to say...

.
 

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Yeah, I know this is an ancient thread and the OP is probably dead or no longer shooting, but Google brought me here now (and may bring others), so allow me a little space to offer some advice.

I started shooting clays this year and was going it alone for a while, trying to figure things out. My shotgun (a Browning Cynergy Sporting Clays) fit me well and I found it to be a really soft shooter. So I shot it several times a month, usually 200 rounds a day, and never felt an ounce of pain.

Then, in an interest in wanting to improve and do things the right way, I invested in some books, watched a lot of videos and took a lesson. I started making a very concious effort (call it over-thinking, if you will) about everything I was learning - break point, gun hold, visual hold. All of a sudden, I was getting serious cheek bruising. Hmmm....I was fine for months and suddenly, everything became painful. What changed?

Not my gun, not my load, not the courses I was shooting -- what changed was my technique. I had gone from a mostly pre-mounted stance to a more dynamic one and while my cheek mount was not painful -- even while bruised, I was getting severe pain forward of the cheekbone and at the rear of my jaw. I'm sure an instructor would have picked up on my poor form. I figured out (finally) that I was moving my head rather than eyes on those crossers and mounting improperly -- on the right to left crossers (I'm right handed), I'd turn my head in, nose to the stock, and my cheekbone would get bruised. On the left to right crossers, I'd mount with my nose turned away from the stock, bruising the back of my jaw near the ear.

So some self-education, or a little knowledge, can be dangerous as they say. I had to figure this out because I can't go to any more big presentations at work with a huge bruise on my cheek (or borrowing my wife's makeup). Hope this might help someone in the next 15 years. :)
 

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Several things are involved in cheek slap and its intensity: All three relate to gun fit. They are the size and shape of the shooter, the stock's dimensions and the shooting form (stance, body posture, weight distribution and the way the cheek makes contact with the comb) used by the shooter. All of these combine to create a well fitting gun.

To complicate matters further, elements of these three are often interrelated. When an element of one changes, or is out of whack, other elements are affected, which changes the shooting form that the shooter must use to shoot. Needless to say, some shooting form elements are better than others; some are conducive to better shooting and others do the opposite.

As someone suggested above, you can try to shim the recoil pad. The most common shimming involves putting washers on the top pad attachment screw between the stock and the recoil pad.

Put as many washers there until the whole recoil pad, top to bottom, makes simultaneous contact with your shoulder as you mount the gun with the barrel raised to a normal shooting height.

You will have corrected the "pitch" on your stock. Pitch is the angle formed by the recoil pad and the rib, close to 90 degrees. Changing pitch affects the comfort when shooting but it has no effect on a gun's point of impact (POI).

There are several other causes of cheek slap but pitch correction one of the more common aids. Be aware however, that just because the pitch is correct for you, that does not guarantee elimination of cheek slap.
 

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Stated many times so far, but worth repeating again in four simple words - gun fit is everything. Pump, auto, side-by-side, over/under - makes no difference - if it doesn't fit well, it's going to potentially beat you up and it's highly unlikely it's going to hit your point-of-aim (POA). This will make it even harder for you to become proficient with it as well.

Years ago (when I could actually shoot sporting clays with some proficiency!), I took lessons from Dan Carlisle. In 2 hours, I would shoot approx. 14 boxes of shells. My O/U fit me well and that 2 hours was a breeze. At that time I owned a 20 gauge Winchester 101 O/U. Two boxes of shells through that gun either dove hunting or shooting skeet and I felt like I'd gone two rounds with Mike Tyson.

Whatever you shoot, MAKE SURE IT FITS YOU! There are enough competent shotgun fitters around that you should be able to make this happen.
 
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