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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I purchased a 28 ***** O/U today at the gun show (paid 300) for a gun that is only marked with A. Zoli on the barrel on one side and Cape outfitters on the bottom of the barrel. Took this out and shot this gun and it really suprised me..ncie gun for the bucks.....I bought this for my 9 year old, he shot this today and loved it as well but I need to cut the stock to fit him. Is there anywhere I can buy another stock for this gun so i dont ruin this one as he gets bigger (and save for me later)

Thanks
 

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I had a real hard time locating parts for my dad's Zoli, I would not cut that stock because I don't think you'll find another one especially being it's a 28 gauge, it's probably a 20 gauge frame but that's still going to be harder to find than a 12.

Maybe cut it no more than an 1 1/2" then you could install a new pad from the below company when you are ready.

http://www.newenglandcustomgun.com/
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Any idea of what it would cost to have one made, it wouldnt have to be top notch looking just fit right, that way I could cut the new one and save the orginal for later?
 

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You could cut it off, and add a rubber recoil pad. Then when he gets bigger, put a Graco adjustable butt plate on it. With the Graco you can add about 1 1/2".

bd
 

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Due to the rarity of the gun and it needing to be hand fit (because it's an O/U), I would expect a custom made stock would be necessary. I don't know for sure, but you're probably need to spend over twice what you paid for the gun to have a stock made. Regardless, it sounds like you made an excellent purchase for $300.
 

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Your son is very lucky (I suspect you are, too!!).

The gun only cost you 300 bucks. That's the most you can lose if you badly screw it up. You son deserves to have a nice-fitting gun - it'll set him up for life.

If it was me, I would cut the stock to fit my kid's dimensions now. In a couple of years or so, he'll need a pad to lengthen it and I would put a Galco on it. You can add stuff inside to lengthen it up to about an inch (I have used sheet cork for this)

When he finally gets too big for even this, lengthen the sotck with a nice piece of walnut or some contrasting wood. You can do this yourself and if you're careful it will come out OK.

If you really muck it up, you'll be out 300 bucks but in the meantime your son will have had several years of very nice shooting with his dad. Priceless.
 

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One way to get a cheap stock on your own is to make a new one from scratch. Takes a bit of patience and care, but the experience can be very rewarding. I have done a couple, so I know whereof I speak.

You will need a hardwood plank about 15 inches long, planed down to 1.5" thickness or so. Any tight grained hardwood will work for your purposes. (African mahogony is very good.) Remove the original gunstock, place it on the blank and trace around it. Cut the new stock out of the blank any length you want. Cut the butt end straight across so that a recoil pad can be easily fitted sooner or later to increase the length.

Work the wood down to rough shape with whatever tools you have. Leave a bit of extra wood around the action to be removed last after the inletting is done.

Inletting is the time consuming work because after hogging out any big open areas you have to proceed slowly and carefully removing wood with knife and chisel, A Dremel tool can be useful here. You have to remove just enough wood that the metal fits tightly within the inletting. By constantly trying and fitting the metal as you go you can do this quite accurately with hand tools. When you are getting near to final fit you can rub pencil lead on the metal parts as you fit. The lead will rub off on the high spots to show you what wood to remove next. If you booboo and cut too much away in a small area, you can fill it in with a glue/sawdust paste after final fit. Oil the metal well and slip it in, forcing the fill to conform.

If the zoli has a through bolt in the tang, you have to drill the hole on a drill press. Take your time setting it up with level, square and whatever else it takes to hold the wood steady and in perfect position beneath the bit to put the hole through in exactly the right place. The last one I did took over an hour setting up before I was satisfied that everything would be right when I pulled the handle down. Use the proper sized drill to start with. Lower it slowly to start, so it doesn't run out at the top when it engages the wood. If you had the setup right, the bolt will go right through and engage the threads on the other side. If you blow it, drill out to 17/64" and glue in a hardwood dowel and try again.

Once the inletting is done, you can take the rough surface down to final shape and apply your favorite gunstock finish. It is a project, but not beyond anyone with patience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I was just about to try the make it yourself idea..as a person that my wife say "has every friggen tool in the world" I figured I could do this and as you said it would be a great project. Thanks for the help..one question...WTH is inletting?
 

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inletting is the carving out of the insides of the stock where it will meet the action. Can get very complicated depending on the action.

Personally, I'd take of the existing stock, send it to Wenig's and have them duplicate it on the cheapest wood they have and you finish it yourself. Might cost you $250 but you stole the gun anyway. When your son is done with it (which lets face it, either he'll want a 20ga in a couple years or you'll get sick of paying $10/box for ammo), you take it off and drop the old stock back on for a weekend play toy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
another good idea. Do you have any idea how long that takes to do?...But wow you pay 10 bucks for shells? I pay 6.20 a box for 28g
 

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If you have decent tools and any kind of woodworking skills it will take you about 40-50 hours plus checkering if you want to try that. That will take about $20 worth of tools you don't likely have. A lot of people have neither the patience nor the aptitude for such a project, but it is not that hard if you do. If it doesn't work out, you can always recover by going down one of the other trails. All you are out is your time and a buck or two for materials. You do not harm the original stock in the process. The part of the job where the metal mates with the wood is called inletting because you are letting the metal into the wood.

The boy might find the process interesting as well. Apparently the father/son bond is at work already.

I imagine there are others here who have restocked a gun and can chime in if you have any specific questions as you go along.
 
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