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Head to Wal-Mart and look for a angle back Beretta 390...$567, easy to clean and VERY reliable.
 

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Hmmm....this could be a troll....but I guess I will bite.

You may be a large person, and your 12 year old may also be the size of most 16 year olds, but, IMHO, I think you might be making a mistake buying a 12 gauge. Do you have a specific reason for getting a 12 gauge?

One of the worst things you could do to a new shooter is make them overly sensitive to recoil (e.g a flinch at age 12 :shock: ), or have recoil ruin their experiences and turn them off to shooting for good. A 20 is going to usually have less felt recoil than a 12 (This is assuming you are not reloading light 7/8 oz loads).

Also, weight is the second factor. Most 20 gauge shotguns are going to be easier for a 12 year old to shoot, especially over the course of a round or two of skeet.

Finally, especially at skeet (and you are in the skeet forum so I am assuming that is what you would be shooting), the 20 gauge is not much, if any handicap, over a 12 gauge.

I recently started my two sons into shooting, and almost across the board, the recommendation was for a 20 gauge semi-auto. With the Beretta or the Remington 1100 being the two models most frequently mentioned. Both are available in a youth configuration..or you can have the stocks cut to a shorter length, and replacement stocks are fairly reasonable for when your son jumps up in height one year (My one son just grew about 6" this last year).

Best of luck to you. Shooting with my two boys is one of the highlights of my week right now.
 

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how serious is he about shooting and how much cash you gonna fork out?
 

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steveziv said:
20 gauge auto loader. 12 years old is young. That is my Pacific recommendation. :)
4H we start them at 9 years old. A 20 auto loader is a great choice....if you reload you can a 12 shoot very soft. Less recoil is way more better....I don't care old you are!
 

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SkeetNinja said:
Thanks guys I think I have my answer. Oh and the reason I was thinking of getting a 12ga is because I have heard that the pellet spread is wider.
You've heard wrong! :roll: :roll:

Start the kid up with something he can handle 20 gauge is preferred unless your 12 year-old is shaving twice a day and stand 6'2".

Even a gently 12 is going to kick the snot out of most 12 year-old after a few shots.
 

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SkeetNinja said:
Thanks guys I think I have my answer. Oh and the reason I was thinking of getting a 12ga is because I have heard that the pellet spread is wider.
SkeetNinja,

Whoever told you the pellet spread is wider either misinformed you...or did not communicate what they were saying clearly. The 'spread' of the pellets is determined by the choke. A 12 gauge and a 20 gauge (heck even a 28 or 410) of the same choke (skeet, Improved Cylinder, full, etc.) should all have about the same 'spread'. The 12 does throw more pellets, but at skeet ranges its advantage is not that large.
 

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Two really good choices, if you want to invest in a good gun that he will be able to shoot now as well as later, are:

Browning Silver Micro 20 gauge (either sporting or field versions)
Browning Citori Micro 20 gauge

The benefits:

You can get a full size stock later through Browning's "Growth Insurance Program" at a reduced price.

These 20 gauge micro stocks do have recoil pads on the 20's, unlike the full size 20 gauge versions. This will further reduce felt recoil, plus will give your son that additional comfort factor of "having a recoil pad".

Plus these are well made Brownings that will last a lifetime. For skeet, I like the O/U choice as it will give him a safe way of keeping the action visually open, is easier to use for some new shooters, and gives you two different choke choices when needed.

Two other options mentioned above are very good- Rem 1100, and the Beretta autoladers in 20 gauge.
 

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I love Brownings (I own 3...2 Citori's and a Superposed)...I do not have any personal experience with the Browning semi-auto's, but have heard good things. But again I would lean towards an autoloader over the O/U as it reduces the felt recoil.

I love O/U's and own several, and a Browning XS skeet is my go to skeet shotgun. I also do appreciate the added safety benefits that a break open action shotgun can provide, but really cannot stress the recoil thing enough. Also, lower price of entry if the youngster ends up deciding to chase baseballs, footballs, hockey pucks or girls for a few more years.
 

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Shootshellz
Post subject: Re: Need Skeet Gun
IMHO firearm safety resides between the ears, not upon the action type, be it rifle, shotgun or handgun.
IMHO firearm safety resides between the ears, not upon the action type, be it rifle, shotgun or handgun.

Posted: Mon May 30, 2011 9:56 am
Read more: posting.php?mode=reply&f=94&t=258592#ixzz1Ny4S9gio

ShootShellz:

While I generally agree with you that gun safety starts between the ears, I would say that this applies primarily to an individual's gun safety perspective. For example, you and I might be the safest guys on the range, but a careless person, or a jerk, may not be. I have no way of knowing in all cases how safe another person is going to be, especially on a semi-busy range. In that regard, you just have to rely on the range master and the other guys, and try to be careful yourself.

That's one thing I like about O/U's and SxS's on a range- I not only know that my gun is in the safe position, but I can also see that the other guy's is- even from 20' away, and even from the opposite side of the receiver face that contains the bolt on a semi-auto.

I'm not an O/U snob, and shoot semi's and pumps on the range from time to time, as well as frequently shoot all manner of rifles and pistols. However; I still think that for clay sports, a double gun gives everybody else within shot range a better overall view of the safe state or shooting state of that gun, as well as for the other gun's waiting to shoot.
 

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SkeetNinja said:
Thanks guys I think I have my answer. Oh and the reason I was thinking of getting a 12ga is because I have heard that the pellet spread is wider.
I don't like nasty responses, but I guess "Ninja" has a new definition. :?
 

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VTHokiesDuckhunter: If you are shooting on any range where you have any doubts about your personal safety, I advise you either raise your voice at any offending party or find a new place to shoot. Once again, firearm safety IMHO is between the ears, not upon any firearm action type.
 

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Shootshellz:

you can be assured that I have, and always will say something on any range where I see or perceive something to be unsafe. Fortunately, most of the ranges I shoot at also have rangemasters that feel the same way! And will correct hard core oldtimers as well as new guys.

I also don't like to shoot at ranges that allow alcohol at anytime during shooting hours. Some ranges do, like for "non-shooters or those that are done". This is just my personal prefernce.

I wasn't tring to take issue with you or correct you by the way- just stating that some types of guns are easier to visually see in a safe condition than others. I really don't care what you shoot as long as you handle the weapon safely.
 
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