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I am looking at Richard A. Wolters training books.
Would it matter to get Game dog or Gun dog ? They look the same to me except Game dog refers to retreivers and waterfowl training... What gives ??? :?:
 

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Wolter's is an excellent choice. He has other books..."Water Dog", "Family Dog"...it doesn't really matter which one you use . His methods are pretty straight forward and easy to follow. Repitition is the key...positve reinforcrment... I have used his methods for the last 20 years with Labs. You should look at his books and try to decide which one covers hunting methods closest to yours. I think the publisher just wanted to sell more books so they changed the titles but the core information is the same
 

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I agree with Cemoto, Wolters does a great job. Just poke around the books and see which one suits your needs. I've personally been thru a couple of copies of gundog
 

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Wolters books are good intros, but some dogs and beginning trainers may need some help. If you get to far into the weeds don't be afraid to seek professional help. A pro can correct a problem so fast it will make your head spin; failure to do this can result in a huge amount of frustration with the dog and further problems.

I always trained my dogs, my dad always trained his. I aquired a really nice Llewellin Setter puppy and realized he was more dog than I could train. I paid for a professional to train him and it was worth every penny.

Good luck and remember, don't ever issue a command unless you can reinforce it...
 

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Cordite - didn't i read you might be getting a Britney from the pound... Good dog...

I had a britney and sent him away to school for 6 weeks( the first time). It really doesnt cost that much, less than a new shotgun. Excelent results!!! He came back pointin well, holdin steady to flush and shot! They did a much better job than i ever could have. Had to send him back for a refresher (2 weeks) later on before huntin seasons, but I thoought it was well worth it...
A steady pointer, and a britney ain't bad, is ona the true pleasures in life!!!
 

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When I began training my Lab pup, a friend with terrific Labs lent me Wolter's "Water Dog" and "How to Be Your Dog's Best Friend" by the Monks of New Skete. Both were great for a first-timer to dog training. At six months, I sent the dog to be hunt trained by a professional. When he came back, the lessons I picked up from the books helped me keep the dog polished.

There is nothing better than a well-trained dog at your heel when bird hunting.

Best of luck.
 
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Cordite, You need to get retriever training for the duck hunter if waterfowl hunting. This is one of the few books that actually teach you the force fetch part. And rated very high. I have used this book on a lab and chessie with great results.
 
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I would get a book for either a pointing breed or a retreiver breed. If pointing try this one for us folks who werent born with a check cord in our hands.
Training pointing dogs, by Paul Long. The best advice I can give you is spend a few minutes a couple times a day with the dog. Dont stop and be consistent. Dogs dont understand more than one word at a time. My wife talks paragraphs to our animals. Above all else, dont loose your temper and love em to pieces. The older you get the more you appreciate a dog..
 

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It depends on what type of dog your going to train. I have a pointer and used Wolters "Gun Dog" starting him out at about 7 weeks. He's now 1 1/2 and doing very well. The important thing is to start him young so he learns how to learn. If your training a retriever get the "Water Dog" Some of Wolters concepts are a little outdated with todays electronic collars but his basic techniques and his writing style make it easy to learn. And I got mine off ebay for $9 including shipping.
 
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I got both gun dog and game dog from the library and trained my lab based upon taking the information that made sense in them and incorperating them into training. She is 9 months now and has done everything that I have asked her to do. She is steady, takes wistle and hand signals both on land and in water. There is no magic to training a dog - it just requires patience, consistency and time. By this, I mean you need to work with the dog from the day you get it for several short sessions a day - especially the first month. Anyone who says that they don't have the time should not own a dog as any dog requires attention every day anyway. There is no need to send a dog off to school and have someone else train her - that is just a lazy man's approach to dog training. You need to form the bond with the dog and gain it's trust and understanding.

Anyone with patience and the ability to read and apply the things you have read can easily train a dog to hunt both upland and waterfowl without ever having to resort to any firmer reprimanding than the rare scruff and look in the eyes.

It only takes a half hour a day the first month, then a few sessions a week after that to train her - hell you probably waste more time than that reading on the old crapper lol. Good luck.
 
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