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Hi,
I'm brand new to shotguns in general. In fact I've only handled a club cynergy O/U at a basic trapshooting class I took last week. I'm not new to guns though and I've been shooting NRA highpower rifle competitions for over a dozen years.

Okay, here's my question. I have a Browning BPS Hunting 12g with a 28" barrel. What's the proper way to load it during a round of trap. Just by reading the manual, I'm assuming it's one shell into the mag, work the action back then forward, then take the gun off safe and call "pull." Is there something I'm missing?

Thanks for your help.

edited to add: One additional question; which choke should I be using in this gun for trap?
 

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Welcome to the forum :D

huckster said:
I'm assuming it's one shell into the mag, work the action back then forward, then take the gun off safe and call "pull."
Only if you want to upset serious, trapshooting old phartes .........like me :wink: that are shooting on the same squad.

There is a more efficient way that will be easier for you in the long run and will not draw attention.

For loading the BPS for trap singles, they are similar to an Ithace M37 in that regard, here it is;

I shot an Ithaca M37 Supreme Trap from 1972 to 1976 steadily and became quite proficient at it. The same system works for the BPS.

With the gun empty and open, hold the gun right side up, muzzle slightly down, as you do with any repeating trap gun when on station.

"Bump" the fore end forward about 1/4", this will cam the carrier up to the upper part of its cycle, clearing a path to the chamber.

Insert a shell into the ejector port and "thumb" it directly into the chamber. This is the part that takes just a bit of practice.

Pull the for end back, the carrier will "drop" and now the shell cannot fall out even if the gun is tipped back.

When it is your turn to shot, close the gun and shoulder it in one motion.

This way there is no turning the gun over to load, which gets tiring for the shooter. There is no unecessary "shucking" of the fore end, lots of us don't like this on the line since it is distracting and more importantly, if you don't know the shooter, you are not sure of their level of experience and that they know when their gun has a round in it.

Leave the safety in the "fire" position, this is fine for trap. In trap, the gun is ALWAYS pointed downrange when you're on the shooting position and is otherwise open & empty and pointed in a safe direction when changing positions. Trap single barrel guns like the BT99 don't even have a safety since all they are used for is trap.

If it is 16 yard singles, modified is often used by new shooters although I run full for everything.

Good luck and enjoy your 1st time out with the BPS :D
 

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huckster said:
(I think I've got it down, just practicing with snap caps)
Good, I was going to suggest that but wasn't sure if I should, not everyone has snap caps.

After a bit of practice, it can be done 2nd nature.

We have had a few new shooters at the club with BPS's and they did just fine using this technique.

Once you have it down, you can focus on grinding up those targets :D
 
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