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My grandfather recently presented me with a Winchester Model 1400 Mk II 12 ga. shotgun. I used the gun for the first time it has been used in a long time and now need information on how best to clean the weapon and how to remedy the slowness of the action and its tendancy to not accept new shells into the chamber at inopportune moments(i.e. when I would call for two pigeons to be thrown, the first shell would fire but the next shell would stick about half way in the chamber.). Any help would be appriciated. thank you :?:
 

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Did you receive the owners manual with the gun?

If not find one online @ ebay, here, gunbroker or any other number of websites. Just do a google search for "winchester 1400 manual" and you'll get one.

Read thru this baby and clean the gun. I would suggest getting Breakfree CLP and give it the once over.

Other things I'd do, buy some good ammo then make sure you're not short stroking the pump action.
 

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You may also want to go to e-gunparts.com and look through there break down DWG's. Other wise jlp gave good advice. I am betting the exhaust ports in the barrel or somewhere down the line are gunked up from sitting so long. Your return spring could need replacing too. I have only heard that they can go bunk after long periods of sitting, but a good cleaning is the first cheap thing followed by some 1 1/8oz loads.
 

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jlptexashunter, I don't want to come accross as being a critic but I believe the Winchester 1400 is a semi auto,not a pump gun. Otherwise I think the advice you gave was excellent.

Rod. :)
 

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Geez--don't tell me Winchester won't send him an owner's manual--at least a xerox of it? What have we come to? JLP is right, as usual--the main problem with actions that don't quite function right is dirt. Especially on old guns, people have put them away for years with some kind of bizarre goo on them that turns gummy, collects dust, and hampers useful movement. If it's REALLY bad, take it to a competent gunsmith (a real one, not just some guy who sells guns behind a counter) and ask him to clean it and test it for functioning. It'll cost ya, but you'll have a nice functioning firearm. Clean it well every time you use it after that.
 

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The first thing to keep in mind when troubleshooting an automatic shotgun is to use the CORRECT ammunition with it. Many times, a person will have a gun intended for 3" magnum ammo and they can't figure why it won't work with 2 3/4" ammo. OR, even if the gun is designed to be used with 2 3/4" ammo, it may be intended for FIELD or HUNTING loads and not the weak target stuff. Before you do anything else to the gun, get some HEAVY field loads, or 3" magnum if so chambered, and try that. Be sure to buy good quality ammo with brass heads and not the cheap aluminum heads which often doesn't work well in some guns.

If changing ammo doesn't help, make sure the gun is assembled correctly. Many times, a person will put the piston ring, friction ring, or some other part on backward. Or, they may have a broken or missing O ring and not even know it. (Not all autos have O rings).

Third, disassemble the gun completely and clean it well. Then lubricate it well with lightweight gun oil. Breakfree CLP works great. Use it liberally on ALL moving parts.

Check the gas port(s) and be sure they are cleaned out good. Use a drill bit (by hand) and lots of solvent to remove built up crud that may be partially blocking the hole(s).

Fourth, and particularly on Remington 1100 or 1187, be sure the inside of the magazine tube is clean and that the magazine tube spring is strong enough to do its job. If it isn't, replace it.

If the above things don't solve the problem, remove the recoil pad (and buttstock too if necessary) and take off the cap/plug on the end of the recoil spring tube (also called "action spring"). Clean out this tube and lightly lubricate with lightweight gun oil. If this spring is weak, it may need replacing. They are not expensive.

If all these steps are properly taken, I can't imagine the gun not working correctly unless some part is broken or very badly bent. I would estimate that the above steps would solve the problems of at least 98% of the automatics that aren't functioning correctly. Sometimes a gun may need a little polishing of the chamber to make funtioning a little easier, but this will seldom stop it from functioning if all the above steps are followed.
 

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See? Ulysses and the other shotgun experts always know the details. Live and learn, as they used to say in the Army, Live and learn!

Jeff23
 
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