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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok I have the gun and a choke. What kind of turkey call would be good for a beginner?

What other things should I be getting that I will need or that will come in handy?
 

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For a beginner I would recommend a box call. Then once you get good with it... Move up to a slate.
 

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Definately start with a box call. But, buy a diaphram call and start practicing with it. Eventually you'll want to start using one.

FWIW,

Jim
 

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A few rounds of ammo would probably go nicely with that shotgun and choke.

Bob
 

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I would do it the other way around. It's way easier to get good quiet and loud clucks, purrs and yelps out of a glass call. Check out the Primos line of calls. Their Freak and Power Crystal work very well and are pretty easy to figure out.

Buy it now and practice until you can make all of these sounds:

http://www.vaturkey.com/sounds.htm

Read the descriptions.

On slate calls with the peg at a 45 degree angle to the slate and end pointed away from your body, make small circles for yelps, slow straight lines for purrs and long slow j's for a a purr with a cluck on the end. Very fast short, pressing hard, straight lines will do cuts.

Then buy a box call and some mouth calls and you're all set.

The box calls are great for when the wind is blowing. Also if you are using it as a locator call it carries the best of all calls.

Mouth calls are good all around calls but really make it nice because there is not movement involved.
 

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You will want to gat a locator call or two also. Here are a few different kinds. Crow, Hawk, Owl, or Gobbler(shaker).
A turkey vest is nice to have for all of your gear and most have a seat that folds down from the back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What about camo?

Im into versatile things that work in different types of areas.

I already have alot of Natural Gear, the original pattern.

Is anyone else here using natural gear?
 

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I like natural gear in the late winter but in spring turkey season I like Mossy Oak obsession.

This year I'm going to give ASAT camo a go and see what's doin' there.

http://www.asatcamo.com
 

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Natural Gear is a pretty good all around pattern. Mossy Oak Shadow Grass is pretty good for all around use.

jlptexashunter, you will like ASAT for deer hunting. It works great for either tree stand or ground hunting. The pattern really takes advantage of how deer see. A few other similar and good patterns for deer are Predator Fall Brown and Sticks n' Limbs.
 

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You'll also want a headnet of some sort and light gloves. I really wouldn't sweat the details on the particular pattern of camo as much as I would make sure that items like face and hands are covered from any visibility or reflection. If you forego gloves, ditch the rings and watch. Do you wear glasses? If so, you might want to consider buying a pair of frames with a matte black finish. Ditto for a gunsock: any potential reflection from glossy wood or the barrel is far more visible than your clothing.

I've had turkeys walk up within 25 yards of me while I was deer hunting in blaze camo, and I always carry a magnum turkey load with me because I've killed toms that I've run across while grouse hunting--again in a blaze-cape bird jacket and blaze baseball cap. I think the birds are incredibly sensitive to movement or reflected light of any sort, so I'd focus on eliminating those areas first in your efforts to get them within range of you.

Others have advised you well on calls. I started with a slate and added a box; never could get proficient with a diaphragm mouth call. Whatever style you choose, you must practice with it. You don't need to know a little bit of 20 different calls; you just need to know 3 or 4 very well (yelp, cluck, purr, and kee-kee run will serve 90% of your needs).

Finally, you'd be well-served by reading up on the topic. Get your hands on any of the books that Dr. John McDaniel has written about turkey hunting; he is perhaps the foremost founding father of modern turkey hunting, having first published on the topic just when it was beginning to take off, in the early 1970s. His books are clear and concise, and he backs his assertions with testing.

Good luck.

PS: join the NWTF. Turkey hunters are part of a brotherhood, and those you meet through your local NWTF chapter will probably be the very best resource you'll ever find.
 

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I read through everyones suggestions and they are all good but I thought I might add one that seemed to be overlooked. I always carry a lightweight mesh blind and a small pair of one handed pruning shears into the spring woods. Remember turkeys and humans have similar forms of eyesight. Turkey vision is keyed towards movement. The blind with light weight poles will conceal your 90% of your body. Only your head and kneetops(with your gun resting on them)should be visible. Use the shears to cut brushy green sablings and braches to stick around your blind to enhance concealment. Dont obscure your vision or shot path though. If you have roosted a bird the night previous find a comfortable inconspicuous location and set up your blind well before light. Give him a few yelps when he begins to gobble in the morning. Then put down your call and dont touch it again. Repeat dont over call. Now all you have to do is wait him out.
 

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trdixon--

Go out to your local sporting goods store (Gander Mt., Dicks, MC Sports, even possibly Wal-Mart) and purchase those hard cover books about hunting. Purchase one on Turkey Hunting.

Last season when I started, I purchased 2 of them:

"The Complete Hunter: Wild Turkey"
&
"The Complete HunterL Advanced Turkey Hunting"

It was the BEST money I spent on the sport. In these books you will learn patterning, camo, stragety, the different kinds of birds, calling, and ANY other type of stuff you'll want to know about turkeys, and turkey hunting.

If there was 1 thing I would buy to gain insight knowledge about hunting Turkeys, it would be to consult these books.

And the best thing about them, is that they deal with EVERYTHING that can come up in the woods when dealing w/Toms.

They are just FANTASTIC--I wouldn't be the turkey hunter I am today w/o these books, I HIGHLY recommend them to ANY hunter getting into turkey hunting.

They are worth every single penny (and prolly worth more when I think about it).

Good luck!
 

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I was just at a hunting last weekend and they were holding a turkey call contest. my 12 old son and I were talking to a few of the callers in the constest and the suggested starting with a slate they felt it was more forgiving the the others calls. One guy (who also sales and makes his own calls) showed my son a couple things and let try, and my som was making turkey sounds not great but good and this was the first time he had every used one. Now my son keeps bugging me on when he can get one. I will be getting him one and a teaching DVD. The thing with slate call they do not work so well when they are wet.
 

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I am new to Turkey Hunting Also.
This will be my first attempt at it.
As far as beginner calling, this is where I have begun and where I am at and I think it will good info for you.
I purchased a Primos Power Crystal Slate and I like it alot. I have been practicing daily on it and have been doing a Yelp, Cluck, cutting and a purr very nicely. It is actually pretty easy to get great Turkey sounds out of it from the get go.
Now putting it all together and knowing when and what calls to make is another thing.
I bought the Primos Turkey Calling DVD. It is great especially on the mouth calling which has helped me alot. It came with a LimbHanger and I have also purchsed a HS Specialties Cuttn 2.5 which I like alot. SO far I have only gotten a very nice Cluck out of it and a nice purr, still working on a yelp. But I can make allsorts of sounds from monkey sounds to squeeks and different sounds by popping air from My diaphram. I practice daily in the home and in the car. I keep the mouth call with me at all times and make sounds when ever I can. Any kind of sound for starters.
 
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