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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I've lurked here and STFA a lot of sites in the past several weeks and the topic of swapping out barrels for the Nova and Supernovas comes up quite frequently. In fact, because of the scarcity of Benelli barrels, I've seen some threads about buying used Novas just for the barrels. It might not be a good idea depending on your uses.

Having just gone through the buying process for my first shotgun, I wanted to share with the forum some of what I learned to help fellow newbies or those on the fence. Keep in mind, this is only my experience and I trust what I was told by the dealer, a small shop that sells the most Benellis in NJ. A 50-year old family business.

When I decided a shotgun was for me, I had three main uses in mind. I was looking for a fun clay pidgeon gun, probably 80%+ of its life will be spent at the range, but I also wanted the ability to go after deer and turkeys. I can do turkeys with this gun, but in NJ you need a slug barrel for deer. I thought that meant finding a gun with swappable barrels to be more economical vs. buying multiple guns.

With that in mind, my choices were 1) used Rem 870 Wingmaster with different barrels, 2) new 870 Express with different barrels, and 3) Benelli Supernova with (I thought) different barrels. Long story short, all three felt good, but the Wingmaster only chambered 2 3/4 and between the Express and Benelli, I opted for the Nova. As a noob, I wrongly understood that swapping out barrels was nothing more than an extra few seconds. In the case of the Benelli, I was flat out wrong.

When I got to the dealer, I explained that I wanted to put a slug barrel on order, because I know they are scarce. He went on to explain that removable barrels are never a good idea if the same gun will carry a sight only part of the time--periodically for the deer in my case.

His reasoning is that the Benelli barrels are NOT cantilevered and are attached directly to the body. Therefore, the sight needs to be screwed into the body of the gun and sighted in. You do not need a sight unless you are hunting game that requires it, so by periodically swapping the barrels and removing/putting on the sight, you are in effect screwing the gun's threads up. Not to mention that it has to be resighted in, etc.

The logic made sense, so if I find myself heavy into deer, I will buy a gun specifically with the sight and slug barrel.

Again, this is probably not news to most of you, but for beginners like me who like the Novas and are working off a budget, this may help. I'm sure there are also certain nuances of the explanation that I might have twisted up a bit, but the general lesson is correct. So, please take it for what it's worth--some friendly advice :wink:

I'd be interested in hearing any feedback from others. I bought 200 trap shells for a trip to the range this weekend. I'll post a report after with pics! I can't wait to use this gun, but right now, I'm in the learning phase so I will be confident how to safely operate it. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hey, that's a great find Aiken. Thanks for that. I think his point was that cantilevered barrels aren't as good as a barrel that goes right into the receiver.

Now, why I have no idea, but it's great to know they are out there for the Benellis if you can get one. At heart, he's a salesman so he could be exaggerating to sell another gun. Who knows.

It would mean a little less arguing with the wife vs. buying a new gun and a new argument.

Thanks! :D
 
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